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Transfiguration of Our Saviour Greek Orthodox Church
Publish Date: 2017-03-26
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Climicus
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Transfiguration of Our Saviour Greek Orthodox Church

General Information

  • Phone:
  • (978) 458-4321
  • Fax:
  • (978) 458-8726
  • Street Address:

  • 25 Fr. John Sarantos Way

  • Lowell, MA 01854
  • Mailing Address:

  • 25 Fr. John Sarantos Way

  • Lowell, MA 01854


Contact Information






Services Schedule

Sunday Schedule:

Orthros: 8:30 a.m.
Divine Liturgy: 9:30 a.m.

Bible Study:

Wednesdays, 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.


Past Bulletins


Announcements

COFFEE FELLOWSHIP

Today’s coffee hour is sponsored by Mary Papageorgiou and family in loving memory of Nikolaos Papageorgiou.

LENTEN FISH DINNER

On Sunday, April 2, the ladies society of St. George’s Antiochian will be sponsoring their Annual Lenten Fish Dinner. To purchase tickets, please contact Martha Stewart at 978-397-4376 or marthastewart@gmail.com.

SAVE THE DATE – PALM SUNDAY LUNCHEON

Join fellow faithful and guests for the annual Palm Sunday Fish Dinner that will take place following services on Sunday, April 9.

PHILOPTOCHOS SOUP AND KOULOURAKIA

Lenten soups and koulourakia will be on sale each Sunday during Lent. Soups are $10 per quart. Koulourakia are $7 per dozen or 3 dozen for $20. All funds raised benefit The Philoxenia House.

PHILOPTOCHOS CASH FOR CLOTHING DRIVE

The Ladies’ Philoptochos Society is running a clothing drive to raise funds for philanthropic efforts. Your donations and support are greatly appreciated.

Acceptable donation items include: clean clothing (all types), shoes, tablecloths, drapes/curtains, towels, or other textile products.

Donations can be dropped off at church between May 6-14 at the following times:

  • Saturdays 5/6 and 5/13 – 9am-12pm
  • Sundays 5/7 and 5/14 – after Liturgy
  • Monday – Friday – 9am-2pm (please call ahead)

Or call Sandra Gulezian at 978-649-3387 to arrange pick up on 5/6 or 5/13 (9am-12pm).

SAVE THE DATE – PHILOPTOCHOS TRIVIA NIGHT

Join us for a fun filled night of snacks, pizza, prizes and raffles. Saturday, April 22, 2017 in the church hall. Doors open at 6pm, trivia questions begin promptly at 7pm. Cash bar available. $25.00/per person, $10.00 high school/college students. Please contact Nancy Lane at 978-256-7472 or dclane7@verizon.net for reservations or questions.

LENTEN BOOK DISCUSSION GROUP

Parishioners are invited to join a new book discussion group led by fellow parishioner Virginia Kimball. We will meet Saturday April 1 from 11-1 at the church. We will be reading and discussing “The Illumined Heart: The Ancient Christian Path of Transformation” by Frederica Mathewes-Green (a short 112 pages). The book will be available for purchase from the church book store for $10. We hope you can join us! 

READERS FOR AGAPE SERVICE

Do you know another language? Are you interested in reading the Gospel at the Agape Service? If so, please contact Fr. Tom for more information. 

DONATION FOR ST. NICHOLAS SHRINE

A second tray will be offered today to benefit the St. Nicholas Shrine in NYC. The rebuilding of this church on the ground of the World Trade Center will prove to be a landmark for people of all faiths; a place of prayer,reflections, and hope. The donation collected today will be sent on behalf of your parish family. If you wish to make an additiona donation, you will find the information on the flyer.

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Weekly Calendar

Sunday, March 26  SUNDAY OF ST. JOHN CLIMACUS

†Orthros, 8:30am

†Divine Liturgy, 9:30am

Lenten Vespers @ St. George (Greek), 6:00pm

40 Day Memorial – Nikolaos Papageorgiou

 

Monday, March 27                 

Compline, 6:30pm

 

Tuesday, March 28

Tuesday Morning Ladies, 9:30am

Community Kitchen, 11:30am

 

Wednesday, March 29

Bible Study, 10:00am

Kafeneion, 10:00am

 

Friday, March 30                    

Akathist Hymn, 6:30pm

 

Saturday, April 1                    

Divine Liturgy @ D’Youville Manor, 10:00am

 

Sunday, April 2  SUNDAY OF ST. MARY EGYPT

†Orthros, 8:30am

†Divine Liturgy, 9:30am

Monthly Trisaigon

Lenten Vespers @ Assumption, 6:00pm

 

TODAY’S PARISH COUNCIL:Christian Zouzas, Stephen Nicholaides, and Jimmy Demetri

TODAY’S GREETER:  Sophia Piper

 

UPCOMING EVENTS

Monday, April 3                     
Compline, 6:30pm

Tuesday, April 4                     
Tuesday Morning Ladies, 9:30am

Wednesday, April 5                
Bible Study, 10:00am
Kafeneion                                                                   
Pre Sanctified- Liturgy, 6:00pm
Dinner to follow

Saturday, April 8                    
Saturday of Lazarus – Liturgy, 9:30am
Palms and Pancakes
Making palm crosses and preparing the church

Sunday, April 9
Palm Sunday Luncheon
Nymphios Service, 6:30pm

Monday, April 10                   
Nymphios Service, 6:30pm

Tuesday, April 11
Tuesday Morning Ladies, 9:30am
Nymphios Service, 6:30pm

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Hymns of the Day

Resurrectional Apolytikion in the Grave Mode

Thou didst abolish death by Thy Cross; Thou didst open Paradise to the thief; Thou didst transform the myrrh-bearers' lamentation, and didst bid Thine Apostles to preach that Thou art risen, O Christ God, granting great mercy to the world.

Apolytikion for Annunciation of the Theotokos in the Fourth Mode

Today is the fountainhead of our salvation and the manifestation of the mystery which was from eternity. The Son of God becometh the Virgin's Son, and Gabriel announceth the good tidings of grace; for this cause, let us cry to the Mother of God with him: Rejoice, thou who art full of grace, the Lord is with thee.

Apolytikion of the Church

When You were transfigured on the mountain, O Christ our God, You showed Your disciples Your glory as far as they could bear.  So now, for us sinners also, let this same eternal light shine forth through the prayers of the Theotokos.  O Giver of Light, glory to You.

Seasonal Kontakion in the Plagal Fourth Mode

To you, Theotokos, invincible Defender, having been delivered from peril, I, your city, dedicate the victory festival as a thank offering. In your irresistible might, keep me safe from all trials, that I may call out to you: "Hail, unwedded bride!"
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Gospel and Epistle Readings

Epistle Reading

Prokeimenon. Grave Mode. Psalm 28.11,1.
The Lord will give strength to his people.
Verse: Bring to the Lord, O sons of God, bring to the Lord honor and glory.

The reading is from St. Paul's Letter to the Hebrews 6:13-20.

BRETHREN, when God made a promise to Abraham, since he had no one greater by whom to swear, he swore to himself, saying, "Surely I will bless you and multiply you." And thus Abraham, having patiently endured, obtained the promise. Men indeed swear by a greater than themselves, and in all their disputes an oath is final for confirmation. So when God desired to show more convincingly to the heirs of the promise the unchangeable character of his purpose, he interposed with an oath, so that through two unchangeable things, in which it is impossible that God should prove false, we who have fled for refuge might have strong encouragement to seize the hope set before us. We have this as a sure and steadfast anchor of the soul, a hope that enters into the inner shrine behind the curtain, where Jesus has gone as a forerunner on our behalf, having become a high priest for ever after the order of Melchizedek.


Gospel Reading

Sunday of St. John Climacus
The Reading is from Mark 9:17-31

At that time, a man came to Jesus kneeling and saying: "Teacher, I brought my son to you, for he has a dumb spirit; and wherever it seizes him it dashes him down; and he foams and grinds his teeth and becomes rigid; and I asked your disciples to cast it out, and they were not able." And he answered them, "O faithless generation, how long am I to be with you? How long am I to bear with you? Bring him to me." And they brought the boy to him; and when the spirit saw him, immediately it convulsed the boy, and he fell on the ground and rolled about, foaming at the mouth. And Jesus asked his father, "How long has he had this?" And he said, "From childhood. And it has often cast him into the fire and into the water, to destroy him; but if you can do anything, have pity on us and help us." And Jesus said to him, "If you can! All things are possible to him who believes." Immediately the father of the child cried out and said, "I believe; help my unbelief!" And when Jesus saw that a crowd came running together, he rebuked the unclean spirit, saying to it, "You dumb and deaf spirit, I command you, come out of him, and never enter him again." And after crying out and convulsing him terribly, it came out, and the boy was like a corpse; so that most of them said, "He is dead." But Jesus took him by the hand and lifted him up, and he arose. And when he had entered the house, his disciples asked him privately, "Why could we not cast it out?" And he said to them, "This kind cannot be driven out by anything but prayer and fasting." They went on from there and passed through Galilee. And he would not have any one know it; for he was teaching his disciples, saying to them, "The Son of man will be delivered into the hands of men, and they will kill him; and when he is killed, after three days he will rise."


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Wisdom of the Fathers

Seest thou how He now proceeds to lay beforehand in them the foundation of His doctrine about fasting? ... See, at any rate, how many blessings spring from them both. For he that is praying as he ought, and fasting, hath not many wants, and he that hath not many wants, cannot be covetous; ...
St. John Chrysostom
Homily 57 on Matthew 17,4,5. B#54, pp.355,356., 4th Century

... he that is not covetous, will be also more disposed for almsgiving. He that fasts is light, and winged, and prays with wakefulness, and quenches his wicked lusts, and propitiates God, and humbles his soul when lifted up. Therefore even the apostles were almost always fasting.
St. John Chrysostom
Homily 57 on Matthew 17,4,5. B#54, pp.355,356., 4th Century

He that prays with fasting hath his wings double, and lighter than the very winds. ... For nothing is mightier than a man who prays sincerely. ... But if thy body be too weak to fast continually, still it is not too weak for prayer, nor without vigor for contempt of the belly. For although thou canst not fast, yet canst thou avoid luxurious living.
St. John Chrysostom
Homily 57 on Matthew 17,4,5. B#54, pp.355,356., 4th Century

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Saints and Feasts

Climicus
March 26

Sunday of St. John Climacus

The memory of this Saint is celebrated on March 30, where his biography may be found. He is celebrated today because his book, The Ladder of Divine Ascent, is a sure guide to the ascetic life, written by a great man of prayer experienced in all forms of the monastic polity; it teaches the seeker after salvation how to lay a sound foundation for his struggles, how to detect and war against each of the passions, how to avoid the snares laid by the demons, and how to rise from the rudimental virtues to the heights of Godlike love and humility. It is held in such high esteem that it is universally read in its entirety in monasteries during the Great Fast.


Matrona
March 27

The Holy Matrona of Thessalonica

This martyr was the servant of a certain Jewish woman named Pantilla, the wife of the Governor of Thessalonica. When Matrona refused to follow her mistress into the synagogue Pantilla beat her so severly that she died in a few days, and thus received the crown of her confession.


Allsaint
March 29

The Holy Martyrs Jonas and Barachesius

As for the holy Martyrs Jonas and Barachesius, they were monks from Persia who lived in the reign of Sapor II, King of Persia from 325 to 379. These Saints found nine Christians in prison suffering for their faith, and comforted them, encouraging them to stand fast till the end, which they did, and received the crown of martyrdom. Because of this, Saints Jonas and Barachesius also were seized, and commanded to worship the fire, the sun, and the water. When they refused, Jonas, among other tortures, had his hands and feet cut off, was crushed in a device that broke his bones, and was sawn asunder. Barachesius was dragged naked over thorns, his whole body was pierced with sharp reeds and then broken in the same device employed upon Jonas, and when boiling pitch was poured down his throat, he gave up his soul into the hands of God.


Iconclimacus
March 30

John Climacus the Righteous, author of The Divine Ladder of Ascent

This Saint gave himself over to the ascetical life from his early youth. Experienced both in the solitary life of the hermit and in the communal life of cenobitic monasticism, he was appointed Abbot of the Monastery at Mount Sinai and wrote a book containing thirty homilies on virtue. Each homily deals with one virtue, and progressing from those that deal with holy and righteous activity (praxis) unto those that deal with divine vision (theoria), they raise a man up as though by means of steps unto the height of Heaven. For this cause his work is called "The Ladder of Divine Ascent." The day he was made Abbot of Sinai, the Prophet Moses was seen giving commands to those who served at table. Saint John reposed in 603, at eighty years of age. See also the Fourth Sunday of the Fast.


Vmakthst
April 01

5th Saturday of Lent: The Akathist Hymn

About the year 626, the Persians, Avars, and Slavs came with a great host and besieged the imperial city of Constantinople while the Emperor Heraclius and the main body of the Byzantine army were absent in the East. Enemy ships filled the sea, especially the Golden Horn, and on land the adversaries were ready for attack with foot-soldiers, horses, and engines of war. Though the citizens courageously withstood them, yet they were few in number and would be unable to repulse the attack of such a great host. Hence, they could not count on any other means of salvation, except the protection of the Theotokos. And truly, suddenly a violent tempest broke up all the ships and submerged them, and the bodies of the invaders were cast out near the Blachernae quarter of the city where the famous Church of the Theotokos stood. Taking courage from this, the people went forth from the city and repulsed the remaining forces, who fled out of fear. In 673, the city was miraculously delivered yet again, this time from an invasion of the Arabs. Then in 717-718, led by the Saracen general Maslamah, the Arab fleet laid siege once more to the city. The numerical superiority of the enemy was so overwhelming that the fall of the Imperial City seemed imminent. But then the Mother of God, together with a multitude of the angelic hosts, appeared suddenly over the city walls. The enemy forces, struck with terror and thrown into a panic at this apparition, fled in disarray. Soon after this, the Arab fleet was utterly destroyed by a terrible storm in the Aegean Sea on the eve of the Annunciation, March 24, 718. Thenceforth, a special "feast of victory and of thanksgiving" was dedicated to celebrate and commemorate these benefactions. In this magnificent service, the Akathist Hymn is prominent and holds the place of honour. It appears that even before the occasion of the enemy assaults mentioned above, the Akathist Hymn was already in use as the prescribed Service for the Feast of the Annunciation, together with the kontakion, "When the bodiless one learned the secret command," which has the Annunciation as its theme. It was only on the occasion of the great miracle wrought for the Christian populace of the Imperial City on the eve of the Annunciation in 718 that the hymn "To thee, the Champion Leader" was composed, most likely by Saint Germanus, Patriarch of Constantinople.

Historians have ascribed the Akathist Hymn to Patriarch Sergius of Constantinople (638), to Saint George the Confessor, Bishop of Pisidia (818), or even to Saint Photius the Great (891), all of whom lived either at the time of or after the above-mentioned sieges. However, it appears most likely from its language, content, and style that the true composer of the Akathist Hymn is Saint Romanus the Melodist (6th century).


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