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Dormition of the Virgin Mary Greek Orthodox Church
Publish Date: 2019-05-19
Bulletin Contents
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Dormition of the Virgin Mary Greek Orthodox Church

General Information

  • Phone:
  • (540) 667-1416
  • Fax:
  • (540) 667-1990
  • Street Address:

  • 1700 Amherst Street

  • Winchester, VA 22601


Contact Information




Services Schedule

Sunday Services

Matins -                 8:50 am 

Divine Liturgy -    10:00 am

Sunday School -  Immediately following Holy Communion


Past Bulletins


Hymns of the Day

Apolytikion of Great and Holy Pascha in the Plagal First Tone

Christ is risen from the dead, by death, trampling down upon death, and to those in the tombs He has granted life.

Resurrectional Apolytikion in the Third Tone

Let the Heavens rejoice; let earthly things be glad; for the Lord hath wrought might with His arm, He hath trampled upon death by death. The first-born of the dead hath He become. From the belly of Hades hath He delivered us, and hath granted great mercy to the world.

Apolytikion for the Dormition of the Theotokos in the First Tone

In giving birth you remained a virgin, and in your dormition you did not forsake this world, O Theotokos. For as the Mother of Life, you have yourself passed into life. And by your prayers you deliver our souls from death.

Kevin Lawrence Red Hymnal, pages 222-223

Seasonal Kontakion in the Plagal Fourth Tone

Though You went down into the tomb, You destroyed Hades' power, and You rose the victor, Christ God, saying to the myrrh-bearing women, "Hail!" and granting peace to Your disciples, You who raise up the fallen.
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Saints and Feasts

Jcparal1
May 19

Sunday of the Paralytic

Close to the Sheep's Gate in Jerusalem, there was a pool, which was called the Sheep's Pool. It had round about it five porches, that is, five sets of pillars supporting a domed roof. Under this roof there lay very many sick people with various maladies, awaiting the moving of the water. The first to step in after the troubling of the water was healed immediately of whatever malady he had.

It was there that the paralytic of today's Gospel way lying, tormented by his infirmity of thirty-eight years. When Christ beheld him, He asked him, "Wilt thou be made whole?" And he answered with a quiet and meek voice, "Sir, I have no man, when the water is troubled, to put me into the pool." The Lord said unto him, "Rise, take up thy bed, and walk." And straightaway the man was made whole and took up his bed. Walking in the presence of all, he departed rejoicing to his own house. According to the expounders of the Gospels, the Lord Jesus healed this paralytic during the days of the Passover, when He had gone to Jerusalem for the Feast, and dwelt there teaching and working miracles. According to Saint John the Evangelist, this miracle took place on the Sabbath.


Allsaint
May 19

Patrick the Hieromartyr and Bishop of Prusa and His Fellow Martyrs Acacius, Menander, and Polyaenus

Saint Patrick was Bishop of Prusa, a city in Bithynia (the present-day Brusa or Bursa). Because of his Christian Faith, he was brought before Julius (or Julian) the Consul, who in his attempts to persuade Patrick to worship as he himself did, declared that thanks was owed to the gods for providing the hot springs welling up from the earth for the benefit of men. Saint Patrick answered that thanks for this was owed to our Lord Jesus Christ, and explained that when He, Who is God, created the earth, He made it with both fire and water, and the fire under the earth heats the water which wells up, producing hot springs; he then explained that there is another fire, which awaits the ungodly. Because of this, he was cast into the hot springs, but it was the soldiers who cast him in, and not he, who were harmed by the hot water. After this Saint Patrick was beheaded with the presbyters Acacius, Menander, and Polyaenus. Most likely, this was during the reign of Diocletian (284-305).


Allsaint
May 20

Father Alexis, Metropolitan of Moscow

Our holy and wonderworking Father Alexis, Metropolitan of Moscow, was born in Moscow in 1292, and consecrated bishop in 1350. Chosen as Metropolitan in 1354, he was ordained by Ecumenical Patriarch Philotheus. He founded several monasteries, including the first women's convent in the city of Moscow. From the Greek he translated and wrote out the Holy Gospel. For the good of the Church and his country he twice journeyed to the Horde and did much to propitiate the Khan and ease the burden of the Tartar yoke; he also healed Taidula, the Khan's wife. His relics are laid to rest in the Chudov Monastery in Moscow, which he founded on land granted him by the Khan and his wife in thanksgiving. Today is the feast of the translation of his holy relics, which took place in 1485, and again in 1686.


21_conshel
May 21

Constantine and Helen, Equal-to-the Apostles

This great and renowned sovereign of the Christians was the son of Constantius Chlorus (the ruler of the westernmost parts of the Roman empire), and of the blessed Helen. He was born in 272, in (according to some authorities) Naissus of Dardania, a city on the Hellespont. In 306, when his father died, he was proclaimed successor to his throne. In 312, on learning that Maxentius and Maximinus had joined forces against him, he marched into Italy, where, while at the head of his troops, he saw in the sky after midday, beneath the sun, a radiant pillar in the form of a cross with the words: "By this shalt thou conquer." The following night, our Lord Jesus Christ appeared to him in a dream and declared to him the power of the Cross and its significance. When he arose in the morning, he immediately ordered that a labarum be made (which is a banner or standard of victory over the enemy) in the form of a cross, and he inscribed on it the Name of Jesus Christ. On the 28th Of October, he attacked and mightily conquered Maxentius, who drowned in the Tiber River while fleeing. The following day, Constantine entered Rome in triumph and was proclaimed Emperor of the West by the Senate, while Licinius, his brother-in-law, ruled in the East. But out of malice, Licinius later persecuted the Christians. Constantine fought him once and again, and utterly destroyed him in 324, and in this manner he became monarch over the West and the East. Under him and because of him all the persecutions against the Church ceased. Christianity triumphed and idolatry was overthrown. In 325 he gathered the First Ecumenical Council in Nicaea, which he himself personally addressed. In 324, in the ancient city of Byzantium, he laid the foundations of the new capital of his realm, and solemnly inaugurated it on May 11, 330, naming it after himself, Constantinople. Since the throne of the imperial rule was transferred thither from Rome, it was named New Rome, the inhabitants of its domain were called Romans, and it was considered the continuation of the Roman Empire. Falling ill near Nicomedia, he requested to receive divine Baptism, according to Eusebius (The Life of Constantine. Book IV, 61-62), and also according to Socrates and Sozomen; and when he had been deemed worthy of the Holy Mysteries, he reposed in 337, on May 21 or 22, the day of Pentecost, having lived sixty-five years, of which he ruled for thirty-one years. His remains were transferred to Constantinople and were deposed in the Church of the Holy Apostles, which had been built by him (see Homily XXVI on Second Corinthians by Saint John Chrysostom).

As for his holy mother Helen, after her son had made the Faith of Christ triumphant throughout the Roman Empire, she undertook a journey to Jerusalem and found the Holy Cross on which our Lord was crucified (see Sept. 13 and 14). After this, Saint Helen, in her zeal to glorify Christ, erected churches in Jerusalem at the sites of the Crucifixion and Resurrection, in Bethlehem at the cave where our Saviour was born, another on the Mount of Olives whence He ascended into Heaven, and many others throughout the Holy Land, Cyprus, and elsewhere. She was proclaimed Augusta, her image was stamped upon golden coins, and two cities were named Helenopolis after her in Bithynia and in Palestine. Having been thus glorified for her piety, she departed to the Lord being about eighty years of age, according to some in the year 330, according to others, in 336.


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Gospel and Epistle Readings

Matins Gospel Reading

Fifth Orthros Gospel
The Reading is from Luke 24:13-35

At that time, two of them were going to a village named Emmaus, about seven miles from Jerusalem, and talking with each other about all these things that had happened. While they were talking and discussing together, Jesus himself drew near and went with them. But their eyes were kept from recognizing him. And he said to them, "What is this conversation which you are holding with each other as you walk?" And they stood still looking sad. Then one of them, named Cleopas, answered him, "Are you the only visitor to Jerusalem who does not know the things that have happened there in these days?" And he said to them, "What things?" And they said to him, "Concerning Jesus of Nazareth, who was a prophet mighty in deed and word before God and all the people, and how our chief priests and rulers delivered him up to be condemned to death, and crucified him. But we had hoped that he was the one to redeem Israel. Yes, and besides all this, it is now the third day since this happened. Moreover, some women of our company amazed us. They were at the tomb early in the morning and did not find his body; and they came back saying that they had even seen a vision of angels, who said that he was alive. Some of those who were with us went to the tomb, and found it just as the women had said; but him they did not see." And he said to them, "O foolish men, and slow of heart to believe all that the prophets have spoken! Was it not necessary that the Christ should suffer these things and enter into his glory?" And beginning with Moses and all the prophets, he interpreted to them in all the scriptures the things concerning himself.

So they drew near to the village to which they were going. He appeared to be going further, but they constrained him, saying, "Stay with us, for it is toward evening and the day is now far spent." So he went in to stay with them. When he was at table with them, he took the bread and blessed, and broke it, and gave it to them. And their eyes were opened and they recognized him; and he vanished out of their sight. They said to each other, "Did not our hearts burn within us while he talked to us on the road, while he opened to us the scriptures?" And they rose that same hour and returned to Jerusalem; and they found the eleven gathered together and those who were with them, who said, "The Lord has risen indeed, and has appeared to Simon!" Then they told what had happened on the road, and how he was known to them in the breaking of the bread.


Epistle Reading

Prokeimenon. Third Tone. Psalm 46.6,1.
Sing praises to our God, sing praises.
Verse: Clap your hands, all you nations.

The reading is from Acts of the Apostles 9:32-42.

In those days, as Peter went here and there among them all, he came down also to the saints that lived at Lydda. There he found a man named Aeneas, who had been bedridden for eight years and was paralyzed. And Peter said to him, "Aeneas, Jesus Christ heals you; rise and make your bed." And immediately he rose. And all the residents of Lydda and Sharon saw him, and they turned to the Lord. Now there was at Joppa a disciple named Tabitha, which means Dorcas. She was full of good works and acts of charity. In those days she fell sick and died; and when they had washed her, they laid her in an upper room. Since Lydda was near Joppa, the disciples, hearing that Peter was there, sent two men to him entreating him, "Please come to us without delay." So Peter rose and went with them. And when he had come, they took him to the upper room. All the widows stood beside him weeping, and showing tunics and other garments which Dorcas made while she was with them. But Peter put them all outside and knelt down and prayed; then turning to the body he said, "Tabitha, rise." And she opened her eyes, and when she saw Peter she sat up. And he gave her his hand and lifted her up. Then calling the saints and widows he presented her alive. And it became known throughout all Joppa, and many believed in the Lord.


Gospel Reading

Sunday of the Paralytic
The Reading is from John 5:1-15

At that time, Jesus went up to Jerusalem. Now there is in Jerusalem by the Sheep Gate a pool, in Hebrew called Bethesda which has five porticoes. In these lay a multitude of invalids, blind, lame, paralyzed, waiting for the moving of the water; for an angel of the Lord went down at certain seasons into the pool, and troubled the water; whoever stepped in first after the troubling of the water was healed of whatever disease he had. One man was there, who had been ill for thirty-eight years. When Jesus saw him and knew that he had been lying there a long time, he said to him, "Do you want to be healed?" The sick man answered him, "Sir, I have no man to put me into the pool when the water is troubled, and while I am going another steps down before me." Jesus said to him, "Rise, take up your pallet, and walk." And at once the man was healed, and he took up his pallet and walked.

Now that day was the sabbath. So the Jews said to the man who was cured, "It is the sabbath, it is not lawful for you to carry your pallet." But he answered them, "The man who healed me said to me, 'Take up your pallet, and walk.' "They asked him, "Who is the man who said to you, 'Take up your pallet, and walk'?" Now the man who had been healed did not know who it was, for Jesus had withdrawn, as there was a crowd in the place. Afterward, Jesus found him in the temple, and said to him, "See, you are well! Sin no more, that nothing worse befall you." The man went away and told the Jews that it was Jesus who had healed him.


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Wisdom of the Fathers

In that case [Matt 9:2] there was remission of sins, (for He said, "Thy sins be forgiven thee,") but in this, warning and threats to strengthen the man for the future; "Sin no more, lest a worse thing come unto you."
St. John Chrysostom
Homily 37 on John 1, 4th Century

Great is the profit of the divine Scriptures, and all-sufficient is the aid which comes from them ... For the divine oracles are a treasury of all manner of medicines, so that whether it be needful to quench pride, to lull desire to sleep, to tread under foot the love of money, ... from them one may find abundant resource.
St. John Chrysostom
Homily 37 on John 5, 4th Century

For where tears are-- or rather, where miracles are, there tears ought not to be; not where such a mystery is celebrating. Hear, I beseech you: although somewhat of the like kind does not take place now, yet in the case of our dead likewise, a great mystery is celebrating. Say, if as we sit together, the Emperor were to send and invite some one of us to the palace, would it be right, I ask, to weep and mourn? Angels are present, commissioned from heaven and come from thence, sent from the King Himself to call their fellow servant, and say, dost thou weep? Knowest thou not what a mystery it is that is taking place, how awful, how dread, and worthy indeed of hymns and lauds? Wouldest thou learn, that thou mayest know, that this is no time for tears? For it is a very great mystery of the Wisdom of God. As if leaving her dwelling, the soul goes forth, speeding on her way to her own Lord, and dost thou mourn? Why then, thou shouldst do this on the birth of a child: for this in fact is also a birth, and a better than that.
St. John Chrysostom
Homily 21 on Acts 9, 4th Century

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Fr. Michael Kontogiorgis, Parish Priest

Fmkchapel

 

  

 

 

 

 

Christ is Risen

 

Truly He is Risen

 

 

 

 

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Parish Record Form

Everyone will need to complete a Parish Record Form (click on link below for the form) in order to be certified as eligible (upon review) for membership in the parish.  Only Orthodox Christians in good standing are eligible to be members of the parish.  Completed Forms are to be returned to me.  Only I will be seeing them and after review, keeping them with the Sacramental Records.  You may drop them into the slot at the top of the locked box located on the wall next to my office door if you like or mail them to the church.

 

Please review the following information from the Uniform Parish Regulations...

 

Article 18, Section 7

Each Parish shall maintain a Parish Record which shall include, at a minimum, the following information concerning each parishioner: baptismal and family name, occupation (optional), dates of baptism and/or chrismation and marriage, complete family record of spouse and children, date of entry into the Parish indicating if transferred from another Parish, date of death, and such other information that shall be deemed appropriate.

 

Article 18, Section 1

Every person who is baptized and chrismated according to the rites of the Orthodox Church is a parishioner. The religious, moral and social duties of a parishioner are to apply the tenets of the Orthodox Faith to his/her life and to: adhere to and live according to the tenets of the Orthodox faith; faithfully attend the Divine Liturgy and other worship services; participate regularly in the holy sacraments; respect all ecclesiastical authority and all governing bodies of the Church; be obedient in matters of the Faith, practice and ecclesiastical order; contribute towards the progress of the Church's sacred mission; and be an effective witness and example of the Orthodox Faith and Traditions to all people.

A parishioner in good standing practices all the religious and moral duties as described in this Section 1. At a minimum, a parishioner in good standing must: be eighteen years of age or over; be current in his or her stewardship and other financial obligations to the Parish, abide by all the regulations herein stated and the Parish Bylaws; and cooperate in every way towards the welfare and well being of the Parish. (Stewardship is recommended to be ten percent (10%) of one’s annual income as stated in Holy Scripture to help meet the financial obligations of the Parish, the Metropolis and the Archdiocese.)

 

Parish Record Form

 

Stewardship Form 2019

 

 

 

 

 

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Church Services

Sunday, May 19

Sunday of the Paralytic

         8:50 am - Matins

       10:00 am - Divine Liturgy 

                   Memorials - George Sempeles, 40 days 

                                          Manuel Sempeles, 4 years

                                         Victims of the Pontian Greek Genocide, 100 years

 

 

 

 


Tuesday, May 21

Saints Constantine & Helen

      10:00 am - Divine Liturgy

                 

 


Sunday, May 26

Sunday of the Samaritan Woman
        8:50 am - Matins

      10:00 am - Divine Liturgy

  

 

      

    


Sunday, June 2

Sunday of the Blind Man
         8:50 am  -  Matins

     10:00 am  -  Divine Liturgy

   

      


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Parish News

Pontian Greek Genocide

Pontian Greek Genocide - 100-Year Remembrance

On Sunday, May 19th, the 100-year remembrance of the Pontian Greek Genocide is being held; a date designated by the Greek Parliament as the day of remembrance for the victims.  Metropolitan Evangelos has directed that a memorial service be celebrated on this day and in his encyclical states.... 

 This year we remember the 100th anniversary of the Pontian Greek Genocide, a dark event in the history of the world which has not nor shall it ever fade from the memory of humanity. We keep this remembrance as a means of paying tribute to the hundreds of thousands of victims who were brutalize, tortured, and murdered by the Turkish Government due to their ethnic and religious identity. It is of the utmost importance that the world recognizes and acknowledges as fact the atrocities that took place against the Pontian Greeks. The genocide of Pontian Greeks was nothing short of a systematic extermination. As such, we also pledge to guard against any travesty such as this from ever taking place again.

 

May their memories be eternal.

 

 


Graduate Sunday - June 9th

Graduate Sunday Deadline - May 29th

Please let us know no later than May 29th who is graduating from High School and College. You can email particulars to: frmichael.dormition@gmail.com.  Please include a digital photo of the graduate.  Thank you.

We hope the graduates can join us on Sunday, June 9th for Graduate Sunday. Please let us know if you will be with us. Thanks!!! 

 

Congratulations to our graduates.

 

        

 


Philoptochos Scholarship

Philoptochos Scholarship Information

The annual Philoptochos Scholarship information sheet and application may be found by clicking the link below.  Deadline this year is June 28th.  

 

Philoptochos Scholarship

 

 


Catechism (Sunday) School

Classes Take Place on Sundays

Classes begin immediately following Holy Communion. We encourage our youth to participate in Catechism (Sunday) School to learn about their Orthodox Faith. For more information, please contact Norman Wells at (304) 229-5907.

 

 


Coffee Fellowship

Coffee and... in the Social Hall

Everyone is welcome to join in fellowship following the Divine Liturgy on Sundays. If you would like to host a coffee fellowship, please see the sign-up sheet on the bulletin board next to Father Michael's office door. 

The Mary and Martha Volunteers coordinate the hosting of our Coffee Fellowships.  Everyone is welcome to volunteer to host.  For more information regarding hosting  please contact Linda Wells at  linda@lindawells.net.   

 


Holy Communion / Church Etiquette

Receiving Holy Communion / Church Etiquette 

 

Just some reminders about receiving Holy Communion when properly prepared to do so.....

As with all the Greek Orthodox Church's Sacraments, Holy Communion is offered to Orthodox Christians who are sacramentally in good standing with the Church.  This would mean among other things that if married the wedding took place in the Orthodox Church, if divorced (and were married in the Orthodox Church) an Ecclesiastical Divorce has been obtained, and that you are not under penance placed by a Father Confessor, etc.  The Orthodox Church does not practice open Communion.

When approaching the Chalice, please quietly say your Baptismal name as you take the red cloth and place it under your chin.  Ladies - Please NO lipstick.

Also, please open your mouth to allow the communion spoon to enter, and once it has please close your mouth around the spoon to receive the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ.  Please do not sip, as if sipping soup.  

Aside from spiritual preparation for receiving Holy Communion, it is expected (unless discussed with your Father Confessor) that no food or drink is to be consumed from the time you awake until you receive Holy Communion.  This also applies to children.  Once they are of school-age, children should not eat or drink after they leave home to come to church, and as they get older, from the time they awake.

However, the blessed bread (antidoron) that is distributed at the conclusion of services may be received by everyone and serves to join together all those who have gathered for worship.

Also, don't forget we have a closed-circuit real-time broadcast, with sound, of the services on the monitor in the Social Hall.  If your youngster needs a short break please step into the hall until he/she feels ready to rejoin the congregation, while you continue to be able to participate in the service.  

Participation in services is an evolving process for children as they see, hear, smell, touch (lighting candles, kissing icons) and taste.  That learning process should also not become a distraction for others as they attempt to focus on their prayer and participation.

Please remember that all movement in the church should be curtailed during all processions, the reading of the Epistle/Gospel, the recitation of the Creed and Lord's Prayer and during the sermon, and whenever the priest is facing the congregation (which indicates he is conveying the blessings of God).

 

Thank you for your attention to these reminders.

  

If you are married but have not been married in the Orthodox Church, or if divorced and were married in the Orthodox Church and have not received an Ecclesiastical Divorce, please contact Fr. Michael to discuss the process of restoring you back into the Sacramental life of the Church.


C-CAP (Congregational Community Action Project)

I was a stranger...

Please help the less fortunate by donating non-perishable foods, pantry items clothing and baby items. Place your donations in the C-CAP collection bin in the Social Hall. Thank you.

 


Philoptochos Social Services Outreach

Assistance Needed - Help Us Help You or Those You Know


The Ladies Philoptochos Social Services Committee needs your help. If you need some assistance in getting to medical or other appointments, a ride to church, shopping or financial assistance or would welcome a quick visit just because, or know of anyone who does, the Social Services Committee would like to hear about it.  Please let Father Michael know (540) 667-1416 or frmichael.dormition@gmail.com) and he will pass it on to the Committee.  

This information will be held in the strictest confidence by the Committee and shared with only a select number of Philoptochos members.  

Help us reach out to you or those you know who could use a helping hand.

 

For a comprehensive list of resources in the Metropolitan Winchester area, please click on the link below.

 

Winchester Community Resources

 


Cell Phones

Cell phones should be silenced or turned off during Church services.  Thank you for remembering.

 


Calendars for 2019

Wall calendars and pocket icon calendars for 2019 are available in the Social Hall.  If you cannot come to the church, please let us know and we will mail you one.

 


Lending Library

Did you know the Church has a Lending Library?  

The books available for borrowing are in the bookcases next to our Catechism School area. Most of the books on display are available to be borrowed (those not are on a separate shelf which is marked as reference only).  Feel free to check out the available books.  If interested in borrowing a book, fill out the card in the back of the book and leave it in the basket in the bottom corner.  It's the honor system, so once you have read the book, please don't forget to return it so others may borrow it.  Happy reading!!!

 


Parish Calendar

Upcoming liturgical services, meetings and events can be viewed on the parish’s website calendar and are listed in the Sunday bulletin. To view the Parish Calendar  Click here.

All parish organizations are requested to coordinate with Father Michael the date and time of proposed meetings and events to help prevent scheduling conflicts. Email bulletin announcements or updates to frmichael.dormition@gmail.com. Everyone's cooperation is appreciated.


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Bulletin Submission Guidelines

Bulletin Announcements

Announcements for the parish e-bulletin and printed Sunday bulletin may be submitted by e-mail to frmichael.dormition@gmail.com. The deadline for announcements is Monday evening by 8:00 pm for the upcoming bulletins. 

All announcements must be in connection with Parish events, activities, fundraisers or community services. Fundraiser and community service announcements must be for non-commercial/non-profit events and activities. Submitted announcements must be furnished as desired for placement and are subject to editing.  Submission does not imply acceptance for publication and are subject to review.

All ministries are requested to coordinate with Father Michael, as early as possible, the date and time of proposed meetings and events to prevent scheduling conflicts. E-mail new postings, updates and changes to Father Michael.

Everyone's cooperation is expected and appreciated.  Thank you.

 


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Directions to the Dormition of the Virgin Mary Greek Orthodox Church

We welcome you to worship with us on Sunday and whenever the Divine Liturgy is celebrated. Matins begins at 8:50 am and the Divine Liturgy at 10:00 am.

Click here for Google Map & Specific Driving Directions »

DIRECTIONS TO THE DORMITION CHURCH FROM THE NORTH:

1. Proceed south on Interstate 81 South heading toward Winchester
2. Take exit 317 for VA-37/ US-11 toward US-522 N/ US-50 W/ Winchester/ Stephenson (0.3 mi)
3. Turn right at US-11 S/ VA-37 S/ Martinsburg Pike, Continue to follow VA-37 S (3.8 mi)
4. Take the ramp to US-50 E/ Northwestern Pike (0.2 mi)
5. Turn left at US-50 E/ Northwestern Pike, Continue to follow US-50 E (0.6 mi )
6. Turn left at Omps Dr, Continue to entrance of the Church`s parking lot (100 ft)
7. Turn left into the Church`s parking lot.

DIRECTIONS TO THE DORMITION CHURCH FROM THE SOUTH:

1. Proceed north on Interstate 81North heading toward Winchester
2. Take exit 310 for VA-37 toward US-11/VA-642/ Winchester/ Kernstown/ US-50/ US-522/ Berkely Spgs/ Romney (0.2 mi)
3. Turn left at VA-37 N (5.2 mi)
4. Take the US-50 ramp to Winchester/ Romney (0.3 mi)
5. Turn right at US-50 E/ Amherst St (0.5 mi)
6. Turn left at Omps Dr, Continue to entrance of the Church`s parking lot (100 ft)
7. Turn left into the Church`s parking lot.

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