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Nativity of The Virgin Mary Church
Publish Date: 2021-01-24
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Nativity of The Virgin Mary Church

General Information

  • Phone:
  • (734) 420-0131
  • Fax:
  • (734) 420-0602
  • Street Address:

  • 39851 Five Mile Road

  • Plymouth Township, MI 48170


Contact Information






Services Schedule

 

Sundays 

9:00 am - Orthros

10:00 am - Divine Liturgy

Wednesday 

7:00 pm - Paraklesis 

Abundant Online Giving:  

https://abundant.co/nativitygochurch

 

 


Past Bulletins


Come and Worship!

Just in case you don't know - Nativity is open for worship! Join us in person (masks and social distancing required) or watch online: Visit our livestream web page to see the services.

Upcoming Events

Sunday, January 24, 14th Sunday of Luke 8:45am Orthros & 10am Divine Liturgy (click here to view the Liturgy for the Day)

Monday, January 25, Gregory the Theologian 9am Orthros & 10am Divine Liturgy (click here to view the Liturgy for the Day) 

Tuesday, January 26 - Bible Study on Zoom 11am.  Click the link below to join the meeting.  Join Zoom Meeting https://us02web.zoom.us/j/9177749823?pwd=MUlWaHE2aXh5WCtCNmJHay90NDFjUT09

Meeting ID: 917 774 9823 Passcode: 023606

Wednesday, January 27, Paraklesis  at 7pm
Call or email the church office with your prayer requests. 

Saturday, January 30, 2020, Three Hierarchs 9am Orthros & 10am Divine Liturgy (click here to view the Liturgy for the Day) 

News and Announcements

NATIVITY FOOD PANTRY Many people have asked if they can help our parishioners in this time of need with food donations. We have decided to collect a few specific items that may be hard to find or may be needed.  A new pantry cupboard is here! Help us fill it up.  Suggested pantry items:

Canned soups, cereals, pasta/sauce, Mac and Cheese (the kind that doesn't require milk and butter), Toilet paper, Paper towels, soap.

If you need assistance feel free to reach out to Father Nick, the church office or Parish Council President, Pete Tsaprazis at any time.  Your needs will be kept confidential. 

THE BLESSING OF OUR HOMES AT EPIPHANY As is customary, following the days of the Epiphany feast, the priest visits the homes of parishioners to perform the Agiasmo and to bless the family. If you wish to have your home blessed, please pick up a form at the candlestand, print the attached form or contact the church office to schedule a visit. If you are uncomfortable with Father Nick entering your home during the pandemic, he will come, greet you at your door, and bless the exterior of your home.

Keep track of Feasts, Fasts, Saints and Celebrations in 2021- Pick up a new Ecclesiastical Calendar. Thanks to Charles R. Step Funeral Home for sponsoring them for Nativity.

TUESDAY BIBLE STUDY Did you know that Fr. Nick offers a Zoom Bible study on Tuesdays at 11:00 am? He'd love to have you join the lively discussion.  Click here to join the zoom session.

DON'T MISS THE DEADLINE!  The Panhellenic Scholarship Foundation offers $250,000 in scholarship awards to 40 exceptional Greek American undergraduates.  See the flyer attached to this message or check it out on the GOYA bulletin Board.  Click here to apply online. The deadline to apply is Sunday, January 31, 2021. The scholarships will be distributed at our Awards Ceremony and Gala, which will be held on Saturday, June 19, 2021.

"THE THREE HIERARCHS" GREEK SCHOOL RESUMES CLASSES ONLINE - You may contact Anna Liakou-Hentnik for more specific information at nativity_greek_school@yahoo.com

ALTAR BOYS Please arrive no later than 9:45 am if you plan to serve.   Masks are required, social distance must be maintained. Contact Bill Smith if you have any questions.

NEWS FROM THE PARISH COUNCIL Visit our web page to read about a potential property development near the church.  Contact Kathy in the office if you need to have a letter printed out for you to mail.

Those in Our Prayers

Nicholas the Bishop, George the Priest, Philemon the Priest, Svetomir the Priest, Cassani the Presvytera, Adel Boles and Family, Mary Caracostas, Brandi Cauthen, Angeliki Dellas, Maria  Dionyssopoulos, Constantin Dumitrescu, Kosta Efthimiou, Maria Espinosa, George Fine, Donna Hollis, John Houstoulakis, Kathy Jenaras, Maria Kalas, Helen Kaneris, Constantine Kondyles, Panagiotis Korelis, George Kotsonis, Soula Koumariotis, Panayiota Koutoupa, Nick Kyriacou, Anastasia Kyriazako, Andrula Loisides, John and Julie Long, Anyssa Mahfoud, Wade Mahfoud, Anna Marcus, Bessie Marcus, Angela Mareskas, Frank Maroudis, David Meadors, Chris Milianis, Freda Mollasis, Evelyn Morris, Donka Nanovski, Pavle Nanovski, Alexander Nichoff, Carlo Nichoff, Freda Nicozisis, Marcy Papageorgakis, John Pappas, Marilyn Popyk, Penny Poulos, Maria Rifat, Helen Sitaras, Joan Stockdale, Evan Kostonas Stocklane, Mike  Tjilos, Rick Tobin, Jim Tsakos, Evris and Helen Tsaprazis, John and Catherine Vardouniotis, Maryann Varverakis, Jim Vlahakis, Irene Vouharas, Sheri Wilkins, Irene Yiannati, Sandy Zembylas, Lisa Zervos, Hunsinger Family, Constandina “Michele”, Kyriakos “Chaz”, Stephanos “Roy”, Norma and Basom.

 

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Stewardship and Online Giving

abundant giving

Introducing Abundant Online Giving

Nativity's new online giving service! You can donate by App (available for Apple or Android devices) by web (link on our web page) by ACH/EFT (Kathy will set it up for you) or by texting the keyword "nativitygochurch" to 73256 followed by your desired gift amount. This program connects directly with our parish data system - so your stewardship gifts are imported directly into your record.  Contact Kathy in the church office if you have questions. 

Abundant

 

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Hymns of the Day

Resurrectional Apolytikion in the Plagal Fourth Mode

You descended from on high, O compassionate One, and condescended to be buried for three days, so that from the passions You might set us free. Our life and resurrection, O Lord, glory be to You.
Ἐξ ὕψους κατῆλθες ὁ εὔσπλαγχνος, ταφὴν καταδέξω τριήμερον, ἵνα ἡμᾶς ἐλευθερώσῃς τῶν παθῶν. Ἡ ζωὴ καὶ ἡ Ἀνάστασις ἡμῶν, Κύριε δόξα σοι.

Apolytikion of the Church in the First Mode

Your Nativity, O Theotokos, brought joy to the whole world, for from you dawned the sun of righteousness, Christ our God. Freeing us from the curse, He gave us His blessings. Abolishing death, He granted us eternal life

 Ἦχος δʹ

H yέννησίς σου, Θεοτόκε, χαρὰν ἐμήνυσε πάσῃ τῇ οἰκουμένῃ· ἐκ σοῦ γὰρ ἀνέτειλεν ὁ ἥλιος τῆς δικαιοσύνης, Χριστὸς ὁ Θεὸς ἡμῶν· καὶ λύσας τὴν κατάραν, ἔδωκε τὴν εὐλογίαν· καὶ καταργήσας τὸν θάνατον, ἐδωρήσατο ἡμῖν ζωὴν τὴν αἰώνιον

Seasonal Kontakion in the First Mode

Your birth sanctified a Virgin's womb and properly blessed the hands of Symeon. Having now come and saved us O Christ our God, give peace to Your commonwealth in troubled times and strengthen those in authority, whom You love, as only the loving One.
Ὁ μήτραν παρθενικὴν ἁγιάσας τῶ τόκω σου, καὶ χείρας τοῦ Συμεὼν εὐλογήσας ὡς ἔπρεπε, προφθάσας καὶ νὺν ἔσωσας ἡμᾶς Χριστὲ ὁ Θεός. Ἀλλ' εἰρήνευσον ἐν πολέμοις τὸ πολίτευμα, καὶ κραταίωσον Βασιλεῖς οὓς ἠγάπησας, ὁ μόνος φιλάνθρωπος.
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Gospel and Epistle Readings

Epistle Reading

Prokeimenon. Plagal Fourth Mode. Psalm 75.11,1.
Make your vows to the Lord our God and perform them.
Verse: God is known in Judah; his name is great in Israel.

The reading is from St. Paul's First Letter to Timothy 1:15-17.

Timothy, my son, the saying is sure and worthy of full acceptance, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners. And I am the foremost of sinners; but I received mercy for this reason, that in me, as the foremost, Jesus Christ might display his perfect patience for an example to those who were to believe in him for eternal life. To the King of ages, immortal, invisible, the only God, be honor and glory to the ages of ages. Amen.

Προκείμενον. Plagal Fourth Mode. ΨΑΛΜΟΙ 75.11,1.
Εὔξασθε καὶ ἀπόδοτε Κυρίῳ τῷ Θεῷ ἡμῶν.
Στίχ. Γνωστὸς ἐν τῇ Ἰουδαίᾳ ὁ Θεός, ἐν τῷ Ἰσραὴλ μέγα τὸ ὄνομα αὐτοῦ.

τὸ Ἀνάγνωσμα Πρὸς Τιμόθεον α' 1:15-17.

Τέκνον Τιμόθεε, πιστὸς ὁ λόγος καὶ πάσης ἀποδοχῆς ἄξιος, ὅτι Χριστὸς Ἰησοῦς ἦλθεν εἰς τὸν κόσμον ἁμαρτωλοὺς σῶσαι, ὧν πρῶτός εἰμι ἐγώ· ἀλλὰ διὰ τοῦτο ἠλεήθην, ἵνα ἐν ἐμοὶ πρώτῳ ἐνδείξηται Ἰησοῦς Χριστὸς τὴν πᾶσαν μακροθυμίαν, πρὸς ὑποτύπωσιν τῶν μελλόντων πιστεύειν ἐπʼ αὐτῷ εἰς ζωὴν αἰώνιον. Τῷ δὲ βασιλεῖ τῶν αἰώνων, ἀφθάρτῳ, ἀοράτῳ, μόνῳ σοφῶ θεῷ, τιμὴ καὶ δόξα εἰς τοὺς αἰῶνας τῶν αἰώνων. Ἀμήν.


Gospel Reading

14th Sunday of Luke
The Reading is from Luke 18:35-43

At that time, as Jesus drew near to Jericho, a blind man was sitting by the roadside begging; and hearing a multitude going by, he inquired what this meant. They told him, "Jesus of Nazareth is passing by." And he cried, "Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!" And those who were in front rebuked him, telling him to be silent; but he cried out all the more, "Son of David, have mercy on me!" And Jesus stopped, and commanded him to be brought to him; and when he came near, he asked him, "What do you want me to do for you?" He said, "Lord, let me receive my sight." And Jesus said to him, "Receive your sight; your faith has made you well." And immediately he received his sight and followed him, glorifying God; and all the people, when they saw it, gave praise to God.

14th Sunday of Luke
Κατὰ Λουκᾶν 18:35-43

Τῷ καιρῷ ἐκείνῳ, ᾿Εγένετο δὲ ἐν τῷ ἐγγίζειν αὐτὸν εἰς ῾Ιεριχὼ τυφλός τις ἐκάθητο παρὰ τὴν ὁδὸν προσαιτῶν· ἀκούσας δὲ ὄχλου διαπορευομένου ἐπυνθάνετο τί εἴη ταῦτα. ἀπήγγειλαν δὲ αὐτῷ ὅτι ᾿Ιησοῦς ὁ Ναζωραῖος παρέρχεται. καὶ ἐβόησε λέγων· ᾿Ιησοῦ υἱὲ Δαυΐδ, ἐλέησόν με· καὶ οἱ προάγοντες ἐπετίμων αὐτῷ ἵνα σιωπήσῃ· αὐτὸς δὲ πολλῷ μᾶλλον ἔκραζεν· υἱὲ Δαυΐδ, ἐλέησόν με. σταθεὶς δὲ ὁ ᾿Ιησοῦς ἐκέλευσεν αὐτὸν ἀχθῆναι πρὸς αὐτόν. ἐγγίσαντος δὲ αὐτοῦ ἐπηρώτησεν αὐτὸν λέγων· τί σοι θέλεις ποιήσω; ὁ δὲ εἶπε· Κύριε, ἵνα ἀναβλέψω. καὶ ὁ ᾿Ιησοῦς εἶπεν αὐτῷ· ἀνάβλεψον· ἡ πίστις σου σέσωκέ σε. καὶ παραχρῆμα ἀνέβλεψε, καὶ ἠκολούθει αὐτῷ δοξάζων τὸν Θεόν· καὶ πᾶς ὁ λαὸς ἰδὼν ἔδωκεν αἶνον τῷ Θεῷ.


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Saints and Feasts

Blindboy
January 24

14th Sunday of Luke


Xeniarome
January 24

Xenia, Deaconess of Rome

Our righteous Mother Xenia of Rome was of a distinguished family. While her parents were preparing to wed her, she stole away secretly, taking two handmaids with her, and departed for Mylasa of Karia in Asia Minor, and there she completed her life in asceticism. She was ordained deaconess by Paul, her spiritual father, who became Bishop of Mylasa. Although she was originally named Eusebia, to conceal her identity, she took the name Xenia - which means "stranger" in Greek - because of her estrangement from her country.


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January 25

Gregory the Theologian, Archbishop of Constantinople

This great Father and Teacher of the Church was born in 329 in Arianzus, a village of the second district of Cappadocia, not far from Nazianzus. His father, who later became Bishop of Nazianzus, was named Gregory (commemorated Jan. 1), and his mother was named Nonna (Aug. 5); both are among the Saints, and so are his brother Caesarius (Mar. 9) and his sister Gorgona (Feb. 23). At first he studied in Caesarea of Palestine, then in Alexandria, and finally in Athens. As he was sailing from Alexandria to Athens, a violent sea storm put in peril not only his life but also his salvation, since he had not yet been baptized. With tears and fervour he besought God to spare him, vowing to dedicate his whole self to Him, and the tempest gave way to calm. At Athens Saint Gregory was later joined by Saint Basil the Great, whom he already knew; but now their acquaintanceship grew into a lifelong brotherly love. Another fellow student of theirs in Athens was the young Prince Julian, who later as Emperor was called the Apostate because he denied Christ and did all in his power to restore paganism. Even in Athens, before Julian had thrown off the mask of piety; Saint Gregory saw what an unsettled mind he had, and said, "What an evil the Roman State is nourishing" (Orat. V, 24, PG 35:693).

After their studies at Athens, Gregory became Basil's fellow ascetic, living the monastic life together with him for a time in the hermitages of Pontus. His father ordained him presbyter of the Church of Nazianzus, and Saint Basil consecrated him Bishop of Sasima (or Zansima), which was in the archdiocese of Caesarea. This consecration was a source of great sorrow to Gregory, and a cause of misunderstanding between him and Basil; but his love for Basil remained unchanged, as can be plainly seen from his Funeral Oration on Saint Basil (Orat. XLIII).

About the Year 379, Saint Gregory came to the assistance of the Church of Constantinople, which had already been troubled for forty years by the Arians; by his supremely wise words and many labours he freed it from the corruption of heresy, and was elected Archbishop of that city by the Second Ecumenical Council, which assembled there in 381, and condemned Macedonius, Archbishop of Constantinople, the enemy of the Holy Spirit. When Saint Gregory came to Constantinople, the Arians had taken all the churches and he was forced to serve in a house chapel dedicated to Saint Anastasia the Martyr. From there he began to preach his famous five sermons on the Trinity, called the Triadica. When he left Constantinople two years later, the Arians did not have one church left to them in the city. Saint Meletius of Antioch (see Feb. 12), who was presiding over the Second Ecumenical Council, died in the course of it, and Saint Gregory was chosen in his stead; there he distinguished himself in his expositions of dogmatic theology.

Having governed the Church until 382, he delivered his farewell speech - the Syntacterion, in which he demonstrated the Divinity of the Son - before 150 bishops and the Emperor Theodosius the Great; in this speech he requested, and received from all, permission to retire from the see of Constantinople. He returned to Nazianzus, where he lived to the end of his life, and reposed in the Lord in 391, having lived some sixty-two years.

His extant writings, both prose and poems in every type of metre, demonstrate his lofty eloquence and his wondrous breadth of learning. In the beauty of his writings, he is considered to have surpassed the Greek writers of antiquity, and because of his God-inspired theological thought, he received the surname "Theologian." Although he is sometimes called Gregory of Nazianzus, this title belongs properly to his father; he himself is known by the Church only as Gregory the Theologian. He is especially called "Trinitarian Theologian," since in virtually every homily he refers to the Trinity and the one essence and nature of the Godhead. Hence, Alexius Anthorus dedicated the following verses to him:

Like an unwandering star beaming with splendour,
Thou bringest us by mystic teachings, O Father,
To the Trinity's sunlike illumination,
O mouth breathing with fire, Gregory most mighty.


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January 28

Ephraim the Syrian

Saint Ephraim was born in Nisibis of Mesopotamia some time about the year 306, and in his youth was the disciple of Saint James, Bishop of Nisibis, one of the 318 Fathers at the First Ecumenical Council. Ephraim lived in Nisibis, practicing a severe ascetical life and increasing in holiness, until 363, the year in which Julian the Apostate was slain in his war against the Persians, and his successor Jovian surrendered Nisibis to them. Ephraim then made his dwelling in Edessa, where he found many heresies to do battle with. He waged an especial war against Bardaisan; this gnostic had written many hymns propagating his errors, which by their sweet melodies became popular and enticed souls away from the truth. Saint Ephraim, having received from God a singular gift of eloquence, turned Bardaisan's own weapon against him, and wrote a multitude of hymns to be chanted by choirs of women, which set forth the true doctrines, refuted heretical error, and praised the contests of the Martyrs.

Of the multitude of sermons, commentaries, and hymns that Saint Ephraim wrote, many were translated into Greek in his own lifetime. Sozomen says that Ephraim "Surpassed the most approved writers of Greece," observing that the Greek writings, when translated into other tongues, lose most of their original beauty, but Ephraim's works "are no less admired when read in Greek than when read in Syriac" (Eccl. Hist., Book 111, 16). Saint Ephraim was ordained deacon, some say by Saint Basil the Great, whom Sozomen said "was a great admirer of Ephraim, and was astonished at his erudition." Saint Ephraim was the first to make the poetic expression of hymnody and song a vehicle of Orthodox theological teachings, constituting it an integral part of the Church's worship; he may rightly be called the first and greatest hymnographer of the Church, who set the pattern for these who followed him, especially Saint Romanos the Melodist. Because of this he is called the "Harp of the Holy Spirit." Jerome says that his writings were read in some churches after the reading of the Scriptures, and adds that once he read a Greek translation of one of Ephraim's works, "and recognized, even in translation, the incisive power of his lofty genius" (De vir. ill., ch. CXV).

Shortly before the end of his life, a famine broke out in Edessa, and Saint Ephraim left his cell to rebuke the rich for not sharing their goods with the poor. The rich answered that they knew no one to whom they could entrust their goods. Ephraim asked them, "What do you think of me?" When they confessed their reverence for him, he offered to distribute their alms, to which they agreed. He himself cared with his own hands for many of the sick from the famine, and so crowned his life with mercy and love for neighbor. Saint Ephraim reposed in peace, according to some in the year 373, according to others, 379.


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January 30

Synaxis of The Three Hierarchs: Basil the Great, Gregory the Theologian, & John Chrysostom

This common feast of these three teachers was instituted a little before the year 1100, during the reign of the Emperor Alexis I Comnenus, because of a dispute and strife that arose among the notable and virtuous men of that time. Some of them preferred Basil, while others preferred Gregory, and yet others preferred John Chrysostom, quarreling among themselves over which of the three was the greatest. Furthermore, each party, in order to distinguish itself from the others, assumed the name of its preferred Saint; hence, they called themselves Basilians, Gregorians, or Johannites. Desiring to bring an end to the contention, the three Saints appeared together to the saintly John Mavropous, a monk who had been ordained Bishop of Euchaita, a city of Asia Minor, they revealed to him that the glory they have at the throne of God is equal, and told him to compose a common service for the three of them, which he did with great skill and beauty. Saint John of Euchaita (celebrated Oct. 5) is also the composer of the Canon to the Guardian Angel, the Protector of a Man's Life. In his old age, he retired from his episcopal see and again took up the monastic life in a monastery in Constantinople. He reposed during the reign of the aforementioned Emperor Alexis Comnenus (1081-1118).


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Wisdom of the Fathers

We may learn from this that when we ask with faith, God does not give something other than what we ask for, but the very same thing. However, when we ask for one thing and receive something else, it is clear that either we did not make a good request or we did not ask with faith.
Blessed Theophylact, Archbishop of Ochrid and Bulgaria
The Explanation of the Gospel of St. Luke, 11th Century

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Bulletin Inserts

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Nativity's Gmail Calendar

  • Nativity Calendar

    January 24 to February 7, 2021

    Sunday, January 24

    14th Sunday of Luke

    8:45AM Orthros

    10:00AM Divine Liturgy

    Monday, January 25

    Gregory the Theologian, Archbishop of Constantinople

    9:00AM Orthros and Divine Liturgy - St. Gregory Theologian

    Tuesday, January 26

    11:00AM Zoom Bible Study

    Wednesday, January 27

    7:00PM Paraklesis

    Saturday, January 30

    Synaxis of The Three Hierarchs: Basil the Great, Gregory the Theologian, & John Chrysostom

    9:00AM Orthros and Divine Liturgy - The Three Hierarchs

    Sunday, January 31

    15th Sunday of Luke

    8:45AM Orthros

    10:00AM Divine Liturgy

    Monday, February 1

    Trypho the Martyr

    Tuesday, February 2

    The Presentation of Our Lord and Savior in the Temple

    9:00AM Orthros and Divine Liturgy - Presentation of Our Lord

    Wednesday, February 3

    The Synaxis of the Holy and Righteous Symeon the God-Receiver and the Holy Prophetess Anna

    7:00PM Paraklesis

    Thursday, February 4

    Isidore of Pelusium

    Friday, February 5

    Agatha the Martyr

    Saturday, February 6

    Photius the Great, Patriarch of Constantinople

    Sunday, February 7

    16th Sunday of Matthew

    Memorials and Trisagion

    8:45AM Orthros

    10:00AM Divine Liturgy

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