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St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church
Publish Date: 2018-11-11
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St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church

General Information

  • Phone:
  • (817)626-5578
  • Fax:
  • (817)626-5073
  • Street Address:

  • 2020 NW 21st St.

  • Fort Worth, TX 76164-7708


Contact Information






Services Schedule

Sunday

Orthros: 8:00am

Divine Liturgy: 9:00am

Weekday/Feast Days

Orthros: 8:00am

Divine Liturgy: 9:00am

Evening Services as Scheduled: 6:00pm


Past Bulletins


Welcome to St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church

Christ is in our midst!

It is a blessing to have you join us today. We hope that as you enter into the house of our Lord, you will be transformed during the Divine Liturgy through the humble prayers of the people, their expressions of faith, the all-praising hymns and the love of Jesus Christ. 

Please join us for Fellowship Hour immediately following the Divine Liturgy for some coffee and treats as well as to meet fellow parishioners. If you would like to learn more about our community and Church, you may take some brochures and take a moment to fill out a family information sheet located in the Narthex and Father Nicholas will contact you. Thank you for joining us.

 

The Mission of St. Demetrios 

to proclaim the Good News of Salvation 
through the Orthodox Christian Faith 
for the glory of our Triune God - Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

We are a loving community of believers who journey 
towards our Lord Jesus Christ and one another through our 
WORSHIP, FELLOWSHIP, EDUCATION/SPIRITUAL GROWTH, 
WITNESS, and SERVICE.  

We invite all people to join us on this journey towards the Kingdom of Heaven.

HOLY COMMUNION NOTICE:

While everyone is welcome to worship with us, Holy Communion is reserved for those who have been Baptized and/or Confirmed in the Eastern Orthodox Faith and have prepared through prayer, fasting and recent confession.

 

All Guest and Newcomers are welcome to come forward at the conclusion of the Divine Liturgy to receive the Antidoron, which is bread that has been blessed.

 

STEWARDSHIP, OFFERINGS AND ATTENDANCE 

Bringing our stewardship offerings to the house of God is part of our worship of God. Our stewardship also supports our efforts to proclaim the fullness of the Gospel of Christ in Fort Worth, Texas through our ministries and outreach. Checks should be made out to St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church, designated in the memo for Stewardship (use your stewardship envelope), and placed in the basket. Offerings for the poor and those in need (alms) should be designated in the memo for Altar Fund. (Altar Fund is the clergy discretionary fund to help those in need.) 

 

Our regular attendance

Attendance to Sunday and Weekday Divine Liturgies and other Divine Services are important for our spiritual growth and relationship with Christ as Orthodox Christians. 

 

Stewardship Donations Online: 

You can now add St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church to your online bill-pay with your bank in order to make your Stewardship Contribution Online. Simply: 1. go to your bank's website billpay 2. Add St. Demetrios as a Payee and 3. Include your envelope number in the memo/account field. It is as easy as 1, 2, 3. No more writing checks, no more envelopes! Keep your commitment, even when you are unable to attend on Sunday. You may also visit us online at www.stdemetrios.net and click Donate

 

Parents:

The worship experience is enhanced by having your children participate. Please help them learn proper behavior and reverence while in the Church. Teach them to cross themselves, venerate the Icons, & respond prayerfully “Lord have mercy.” If they become too loud, please take them to the Narthex/Quiet Room for a brief stay and return as soon as they have calmed. More Church etiquette may be found at http://www.stdemetrios.net/our-parish/church-etiquette 

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At St. Demetrios

PARISH COUNCIL USHERS

Stephan Papadopoulos & Timothy Strong


TODAY AT ST. DEMETRIOS

Welcome to our Greek Festival

 


Please pray for us!

PASTORAL CARE: If you or someone you know is sick, elderly or scheduled for surgery please call the office to let us know so Fr. Nicholas can make a pastoral visit, please email him at frnicholas@stdemetrios.net.

PLEASE PRAY FOR THOSE WHO ARE SICK/RECOVERING AND ARE OUR SHUT-INS

Shut-in

Estelle Hieger

Eleni Rork

Mache Fannin

Sophie Harbert

Katina Buster

Fannie Maulsby

James Pendelton

Ann Tsumpis

Ruth Marsh

Peter Vlahachos

Elpis Peters

Katherine Pattres

Mary Nation

Sannie Haratsis 

 

Demetrios & Maria Markos

Sick/Recovering

Tina Theophilos Stokes

 Patrick Cooney

 Nick Phiripes

 Peter Angeletos

 

 

 

 


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Hymns of the Day

Resurrectional Apolytikion in the Grave Mode

O Lord by Your sacred Cross You abolished death, and granted unto the thief blessed paradise. The Myrrh-bearers ceased lamenting and turned to joy. The apostles did preach the Good News at Your command, that You had risen from the dead O Christ Our God, bestowing Your mercy upon the world ever more.
Κατέλυσας τῷ Σταυρῷ σου τὸν θάνατον, ἠνέῳξας τῷ Λῃστῇ τὸν Παράδεισον, τῶν Μυροφόρων τὸν θρῆνον μετέβαλες, καὶ τοῖς σοῖς Ἀποστόλοις κηρύττειν ἐπέταξας, ὅτι ἀνέστης Χριστὲ ὁ Θεός, παρέχων τῷ κόσμῳ τὸ μέγα ἔλεος.

Apolytikion for Martyr Menas in the Fourth Mode

Your Martyrs, O Lord, were worthily awarded by You * the crowns of incorruption, in that they contested for You our immortal God. * Since they possessed Your power, they defeated the tyrants, * dashing the demons' powerless displays of defiance. * O Christ God, at their fervent entreaties, save our souls.

Apolytikion for St. Demetrios the Great Martyr in the First Mode

All the world has found in you a victor, a mighty champion in times of danger, a contender in war who turned the nations back. The boastful pride of Lyaios you put to shame, and you inspired Nestor's courage in the stadium. Therefore, great and holy martyr Demetrios, we pray that you implore Christ, our God, and ask that his great mercy may be granted us.

Μέγαν εὕρατο ἐv τοῖς κιvδύvοις, σὲ ὑπέρμαχοv, ἡ οἰκουμένη, Ἀθλοφόρε τὰ ἔθνη τροπούμενον. Ὡς οὖν Λυαίου καθεῖλες τὴν ἔπαρσιν, ἐν τῷ σταδίῳ θαῤῥύvας τὸν Νέστορα, οὕτως Ἅγιε, Μεγαλομάρτυς Δημήτριε, Χριστὸν τὸν Θεὸν ἱκέτευε, δωρήσασθαι ἡμῖν τὸ μέγα ἔλεος.

Seasonal Kontakion in the Fourth Mode

The Savior's most pure and immaculate temple, the very precious bridal chamber and Virgin, who is the sacred treasure of the glory of God, on this day is introduced into the House of the Lord, and with herself she brings the grace in the divine Spirit. She is extolled by the Angels of God. A heavenly tabernacle is she.
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Gospel and Epistle Readings

Epistle Reading

Prokeimenon. Fourth Mode. Psalm 67.35,26.
God is wonderful among his saints.
Verse: Bless God in the congregations.

The reading is from St. Paul's Second Letter to the Corinthians 4:6-15.

Brethren, it is the God who said, "Let light shine out of darkness," who has shone in our hearts to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Christ.

But we have this treasure in earthen vessels, to show that the transcendent power belongs to God and not to us. We are afflicted in every way, but not crushed; perplexed, but not driven to despair; persecuted, but not forsaken; struck down, but not destroyed; always carrying in the body the death of Jesus, so that the life of Jesus may also be manifested in our bodies. For while we live we are always being given up to death for Jesus' sake, so that the life of Jesus may be manifested in our mortal flesh. So death is at work in us, but life in you.

Since we have the same spirit of faith as he had who wrote, "I believed, and so I spoke," we too believe, and so we speak, knowing that he who raised the Lord Jesus will raise us also with Jesus and bring us with you into his presence. For it is all for your sake, so that as grace extends to more and more people it may increase thanksgiving, to the glory of God.

Προκείμενον. Fourth Mode. ΨΑΛΜΟΙ 67.35,26.
Θαυμαστὸς ὁ Θεὸς ἐν τοῖς Ἁγίοις αὐτοῦ.
Στίχ. Ἐν Ἐκκλησίαις εὐλογεῖτε τὸν Θεὸν.

τὸ Ἀνάγνωσμα Πρὸς Κορινθίους β' 4:6-15.

Ἀδελφοί, ὁ θεὸς ὁ εἰπὼν ἐκ σκότους φῶς λάμψαι, ὃς ἔλαμψεν ἐν ταῖς καρδίαις ἡμῶν πρὸς φωτισμὸν τῆς γνώσεως τῆς δόξης τοῦ θεοῦ ἐν προσώπῳ Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ. Ἔχομεν δὲ τὸν θησαυρὸν τοῦτον ἐν ὀστρακίνοις σκεύεσιν, ἵνα ἡ ὑπερβολὴ τῆς δυνάμεως ᾖ τοῦ θεοῦ, καὶ μὴ ἐξ ἡμῶν· ἐν παντὶ θλιβόμενοι, ἀλλʼ οὐ στενοχωρούμενοι· ἀπορούμενοι, ἀλλʼ οὐκ ἐξαπορούμενοι· διωκόμενοι, ἀλλʼ οὐκ ἐγκαταλειπόμενοι· καταβαλλόμενοι, ἀλλʼ οὐκ ἀπολλύμενοι· πάντοτε τὴν νέκρωσιν τοῦ κυρίου Ἰησοῦ ἐν τῷ σώματι περιφέροντες, ἵνα καὶ ἡ ζωὴ τοῦ Ἰησοῦ ἐν τῷ σώματι ἡμῶν φανερωθῇ. Ἀεὶ γὰρ ἡμεῖς οἱ ζῶντες εἰς θάνατον παραδιδόμεθα διὰ Ἰησοῦν, ἵνα καὶ ἡ ζωὴ τοῦ Ἰησοῦ φανερωθῇ ἐν τῇ θνητῇ σαρκὶ ἡμῶν. Ὥστε ὁ μὲν θάνατος ἐν ἡμῖν ἐνεργεῖται, ἡ δὲ ζωὴ ἐν ὑμῖν. Ἔχοντες δὲ τὸ αὐτὸ πνεῦμα τῆς πίστεως, κατὰ τὸ γεγραμμένον, Ἐπίστευσα, διὸ ἐλάλησα, καὶ ἡμεῖς πιστεύομεν, διὸ καὶ λαλοῦμεν· εἰδότες ὅτι ὁ ἐγείρας τὸν κύριον Ἰησοῦν καὶ ἡμᾶς διὰ Ἰησοῦ ἐγερεῖ, καὶ παραστήσει σὺν ὑμῖν. Τὰ γὰρ πάντα διʼ ὑμᾶς, ἵνα ἡ χάρις πλεονάσασα διὰ τῶν πλειόνων τὴν εὐχαριστίαν περισσεύσῃ εἰς τὴν δόξαν τοῦ θεοῦ.


Gospel Reading

8th Sunday of Luke
The Reading is from Luke 10:25-37

At that time, a lawyer stood up to put Jesus to the test, saying, "Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?" He said to him, "What is written in the law? How do you read?" And he answered, "You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your strength, and with all your mind; and your neighbor as yourself." And he said to him, "You have answered right; do this, and you will live."

But he, desiring to justify himself, said to Jesus, "And who is my neighbor?" Jesus replied, "A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and he fell among robbers, who stripped him and beat him, and departed, leaving him half dead. Now by chance a priest was going down that road; and when he saw him he passed by on the other side. So likewise a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. But a Samaritan, as he journeyed, came to where he was; and when he saw him, he had compassion, and went to him and bound up his wounds, pouring on oil and wine; then he set him on his own beast and brought him to an inn, and took care of him. And the next day he took out two denarii and gave them to the innkeeper, saying, 'Take care of him; and whatever more you spend, I will repay you when I come back.' Which of these three, do you think, proved neighbor to the man who fell among the robbers?" He said, "The one who showed mercy on him." And Jesus said to him, "Go and do likewise."

8th Sunday of Luke
Κατὰ Λουκᾶν 10:25-37

Τῷ καιρῷ ἐκείνῳ, νομικός τις ἀνέστη ἐκπειράζων αὐτὸν καὶ λέγων· διδάσκαλε, τί ποιήσας ζωὴν αἰώνιον κληρονομήσω; ὁ δὲ εἶπε πρὸς αὐτόν· ἐν τῷ νόμῳ τί γέγραπται; πῶς ἀναγινώσκεις; ὁ δὲ ἀποκριθεὶς εἶπεν· ἀγαπήσεις Κύριον τὸν Θεόν σου ἐξ ὅλης τῆς καρδίας σου καὶ ἐξ ὅλης τῆς ψυχῆς σου καὶ ἐξ ὅλης τῆς ἰσχύος σου καὶ ἐξ ὅλης τῆς διανοίας σου, καὶ τὸν πλησίον σου ὡς σεαυτόν· εἶπε δὲ αὐτῷ· ὀρθῶς ἀπεκρίθης· τοῦτο ποίει καὶ ζήσῃ. ὁ δὲ θέλων δικαιοῦν ἑαυτὸν εἶπε πρὸς τὸν ᾿Ιησοῦν· καὶ τίς ἐστί μου πλησίον; ὑπολαβὼν δὲ ὁ ᾿Ιησοῦς εἶπεν· ἄνθρωπός τις κατέβαινεν ἀπὸ ῾Ιερουσαλὴμ εἰς ῾Ιεριχώ, καὶ λῃσταῖς περιέπεσεν· οἳ καὶ ἐκδύσαντες αὐτὸν καὶ πληγὰς ἐπιθέντες ἀπῆλθον ἀφέντες ἡμιθανῆ τυγχάνοντα. κατὰ συγκυρίαν δὲ ἱερεύς τις κατέβαινεν ἐν τῇ ὁδῷ ἐκείνῃ, καὶ ἰδὼν αὐτὸν ἀντιπαρῆλθεν. ὁμοίως δὲ καὶ Λευΐτης γενόμενος κατὰ τὸν τόπον, ἐλθὼν καὶ ἰδὼν ἀντιπαρῆλθε. Σαμαρείτης δέ τις ὁδεύων ἦλθε κατ᾿ αὐτόν, καὶ ἰδὼν αὐτὸν ἐσπλαγχνίσθη, καὶ προσελθὼν κατέδησε τὰ τραύματα αὐτοῦ ἐπιχέων ἔλαιον καὶ οἶνον, ἐπιβιβάσας δὲ αὐτὸν ἐπὶ τὸ ἴδιον κτῆνος ἤγαγεν αὐτὸν εἰς πανδοχεῖον καὶ ἐπεμελήθη αὐτοῦ· καὶ ἐπὶ τὴν αὔριον ἐξελθών, ἐκβαλὼν δύο δηνάρια ἔδωκε τῷ πανδοχεῖ καὶ εἶπεν αὐτῷ· ἐπιμελήθητι αὐτοῦ, καὶ ὅ τι ἂν προσδαπανήσῃς, ἐγὼ ἐν τῷ ἐπανέρχεσθαί με ἀποδώσω σοι. τίς οὖν τούτων τῶν τριῶν πλησίον δοκεῖ σοι γεγονέναι τοῦ ἐμπεσόντος εἰς τοὺς λῃστάς; ὁ δὲ εἶπεν· ὁ ποιήσας τὸ ἔλεος μετ᾿ αὐτοῦ. εἶπεν οὖν αὐτῷ ὁ ᾿Ιησοῦς· πορεύου καὶ σὺ ποίει ὁμοίως.


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Wisdom of the Fathers

For the One Maker fashioned us, the One Creator breathed life into us; we all enjoy the same sky and air, the same days and nights, and, though some be good, others bad, some righteous, others unrighteous, yet GOD is bountiful to all, kind to all.
St. Gregory the Dialogist
Sermon 12, On the Fast, 6th century

The example of the good Samaritan shows that we must not abandon those in whom even the faintest amount of faith is still alive.
St. Ambrose of Milan
Two Books of St. Ambrose, Bishop of Milan, Concerning Repentance, Chapter 11

Gentleness, then, is to be mingled with severity; a sort of compound is to be made of both; so that subjects be neither exulcerated by too much asperity, nor relaxed by too greatkindness.
St. Gregory the Dialogist
On the Life of the Pastor. Chapter 6, 6th century

What is it that I love when I love you? Not the beauty of a body or the comeliness of time. Nor the luster of the light pleasing to the eyes, nor the sweet melodies of all manner of songs, nor the fragrance of flowers, ointments and spices, not manna and honey, nor limbs welcome to the embrace of the flesh - I do not love these when I love my God. And yet there is a kind of light, a kind of voice, a kind of fragrance, a kind of foods, a kind of embrace, when I love my God, who is the light, voice, fragrance, food, embrace of the inner man, where there shines into the soul that which no place can contain, and there sounds forth that which time cannot end, where there is fragrance which no breeze disperses, taste which eating does not make less, and a clinging together which fulfillment does not terminate. It is this that I love when I love my God.
St. Augustine
Confessions 10.6 in The Confessions of St. Augustine, p. 244, 5th century

He who truly wishes to believe in God must be lifted above himself, his mind, and even the whole world. For this reason, the value of faith is considered higher than the value of man. It is even higher than the value of the whole world. Therefore, the reward of faith should be higher than all of man's possessions along with the glories of this world. The reward of faith is God.
Fr. Matthew the Poor
Orthodox Prayer Life: The Interior Way, p. 74, 20th century

When a man reveres God with all his heart and with faith, he receives through God's providence the power to control anger and desire; for it is desire and anger which are the cause of all evils.
St. Antony the Great
On the Character of Men no. 12, Philokalia Vol. 1 edited by Palmer, Sherrard and Ware; Faber and Faber pg. 331, 4th century

The sign that thou lovest God, is this, that thou lovest thy fellow; and if thou hatest thy fellow, thy hatred is towards God. For it is blasphemy if thou prayest before God while thou art wroth. For thy heart also convicts thee, that in vain thou multipliest words: thy conscience rightly judges that in thy prayers thou profitest nought.
St. Ephraim the Syrian
ON ADMONITION AND REPENTANCE.

'The Lord your God is one Lord' (cf. Deut. 6:4), revealed in the Father, Son and Holy Spirit: in the unbegotten Father; in the Son, who is begotten eternally, timelessly and impassibly as the Logos, and who through Himself anointed that which He assumed from us and so is called Christ; and in the Holy Spirit, who also comes forth from the Father, not begotten, but proceeding. This alone is God and alone is true God, the one Lord in a Trinity of Hypostases, undivided in nature, will, glory, power, energy, and all the characteristics of divinity. Him alone shall you love and Him alone shall you worship with all your mind and with all your heart and with all your strength.
St. Gregory Palamas
A New Testament Decalogue no. 1, Philokalia Vol. 4 edited by Palmer, Sherrard and Ware; Faber and Faber pg. 323, 14th century

But you cannot be a neighbour unless you have compassion on him; for no one can be called a neighbour unless he have healed, not killed, another. But if you wish to be called a neighbour, Christ says to you: "Go and do likewise."
St. Ambrose of Milan
Two Books of St. Ambrose, Bishop of Milan, Concerning Repentance, Chapter 11

Godly love cannot be perfect unless a man love his neighbor also. Under which name must be included not only those who are connected with us by friendship or neighborhood, but absolutely all men, with whom we have a common nature, whether they be foes or allies, slaves or free.
St. Gregory the Dialogist
Sermon 12, On the Fast, 6th century

For whosoever superintends the healing of wounds must needs administer in wine the smart of pan, and in oil the softness of loving-kindness, to the end that through wine what is festering may be purged, and through oil what is curable may be soothed.
St. Gregory the Dialogist
On the Life of the Pastor. Chapter 6, 6th century

Let us make our mercifulness abundant, let us give proof of much love to man, both by the use of our money, and by our actions. ... Go then, and put a stop to the evil; pull out them that are drowning, though you descend into the very depth of the surge.
St. John Chrysostom
Homily 15 on Matthew 5, 4th Century

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Saints and Feasts

Menas
November 11

Menas of Egypt

Saint Menas, who had Egypt as his fatherland, contested in Cotyaeion of Phrygia in 296 during the reign of Diocletian and Maximian. A soldier distinguished for his valour in war, he renounced his rank and withdrew to devote himself to ascetical struggles and prayer in the mountains. Filled with zeal and more than human courage, he presented himself in the midst of a pagan festival in Cotyaeion and declared himself to be a Christian. After terrible torments which he endured with astonishing courage, he was beheaded. His martyrium in Egypt became a place of universal pilgrimage; evidence of ancient journeys to his shrine have been found as far away as Ireland. The glory and refuge of the Christians of Egypt, he has been revealed to be a worker of great miracles and a swift defender for all who call on him with faith; besides all else, he is also invoked for help in finding lost objects.


Johnmerciful
November 12

John the Merciful, Patriarch of Alexandria

Saint John was born in 555 on the island of Cyprus in the city of Amathus; his father, Epiphanius, was a ruler of Cyprus. The Saint was consecrated Archbishop of Alexandria in 608. A man of exemplary uprightness, in his zeal for Orthodoxy he strove mightily to fight the many heresies among the Christians in Egypt; but above all, he was famous for his singular generosity, humility, and sympathy towards all, especially the poor. His mercy was so great that the report of it reached the Persian invaders of Jerusalem, who desired to see him because of it. Saint John reposed in 619, at the age of sixty-four.


Johnchry
November 13

John Chrysostom, Archbishop of Constantinople

This greatest and most beloved of all Christian orators was born in Antioch the Great in the year 344 or 347; his pious parents were called Secundus and Anthusa. After his mother was widowed at the age of twenty, she devoted herself to bringing up John and his elder sister in the nurture and admonition of the Lord. John received his literary training under Anthragathius the philosopher, and Libanius the sophist, who was the greatest Greek scholar and rhetorician of his day. Libanius was a pagan, and when asked before his death whom he wished to have for his successor, he said, "John, had not the Christians stolen him from us." With such a training, and with such gifts as he had by nature, John had before him a brilliant career as a rhetorician. But through the good example of his godly mother Anthusa and of the holy Bishop Meletius of Antioch (see Feb. 12), by whom he was ordained reader about the year 370, he chose instead to dedicate himself to God. From the years 374 to 381 he lived the monastic life in the hermitages that were near Antioch. His extreme asceticism undermined his health, compelling him to return to Antioch, where Saint Meletius ordained him deacon about the year 381. Saint Meletius was called to Constantinople later that year to preside over the Second Ecumenical Council, during which he fell asleep in the Lord. In 386 Bishop Flavian ordained John presbyter of the Church of Antioch. Upon his elevation to the priesthood his career as a public preacher began, and his exceptional oratorical gifts were made manifest through his many sermons and commentaries. They are distinguished by their eloquence and the remarkable ease with which rich imagery and scriptural allusions are multiplied; by their depth of insight into the meaning of Scripture and the workings of God's providence; and, not least of all, by their earnestness and moral force, which issue from the heart of a blameless and guileless man who lived first what he preached to others. Because of his fame, he was chosen to succeed Saint Nectarius as Patriarch of Constantinople. He was taken away by stealth, to avoid the opposition of the people, and consecrated Patriarch of Constantinople on February 28, 398, by Theophilus, Patriarch of Alexandria, who was to prove his mortal enemy.

At that time the Emperor of the East was Arcadius, who had had Saint Arsenius the Great as his tutor (see May 8); Arcadius was a man of weak character, and much under the influence of his wife Eudoxia. The zealous and upright Chrysostom's unsparing censures of the lax morals in the imperial city stung the vain Eudoxia; through Theophilus' plottings and her collaboration, Saint John was banished to Pontus in 403. The people were in an uproar, and the following night an earthquake shook the city; this so frightened the Empress Eudoxia that she begged Arcadius to call Chrysostom back. While his return was triumphant, his reconciliation with the Empress did not last long. When she had a silver statue of herself erected in the forum before the Church of the Holy Wisdom (Saint Sophia) in September of 403, and had it dedicated with much unseemly revelry, Saint John thundered against her, and she could not forgive him. In June of 404 he was exiled to Cucusus, on the borders of Cilicia and Armenia. From here he exchanged letters with Pope Innocent of Rome, who sent bishops and priests to Constantinople requesting that a council be held. Saint John's enemies, dreading his return, prevailed upon the Emperor to see an insult in this, and had John taken to a more remote place of banishment called Pityus near the Caucasus. The journey was filled with bitter sufferings for the aged bishop, both because of the harshness of the elements and the cruelty of one of his 310 guards. He did not reach Pityus, but gave up his soul to the Lord near Comana in Pontus, at the chapel of the Martyr Basiliscus (see May 22), who had appeared to him shortly before, foretelling the day of his death, which came to pass on September 14, 407. His last words were "Glory be to God for all things." His holy relics were brought from Comana to Constantinople thirty-one years later by the Emperor Theodosius the Younger and Saint Pulcheria his sister, the children of Arcadius and Eudoxia, with fervent supplications that the sin of their parents against him be forgiven; this return of his holy relics is celebrated on January 27.

Saint John was surnamed Chrysostom ("Golden-mouth") because of his eloquence. He made exhaustive commentaries on the divine Scriptures and was the author of more works than any other Church Father, leaving us complete commentaries on the Book of Genesis, the Gospels of Saints Matthew and John, the Acts, and all the Epistles of Saint Paul. His extant works are 1,447 sermons and 240 epistles. Twenty-two teachers of the Church have written homilies of praise in his honour. Besides his feasts today and on January 27, he is celebrated as one of the Three Hierarchs on January 30, together with Saint Basil the Great and Saint Gregory the Theologian.

It should be noted that, because September 14 is the Exaltation of the Cross, the Saint's memory has been transferred to this day.


Philipapostle
November 14

Philip the Apostle

This Apostle, one of the Twelve, was from Bethsaida of Galilee, and was a compatriot of Andrew and Peter. He was instructed in the teachings of the Law, and devoted himself to the study of the prophetic books. Therefore, when the Lord Jesus called him to the dignity of apostleship, he immediately sought out and found Nathanael and said to him, "We have found Him of Whom Moses in the Law and the Prophets did write, Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph" (John 1.45). Having preached Jesus the God-man throughout many parts of Asia Minor, and having suffered many things for His Name's sake, he was finally crucified upside down in Hierapolis of Phrygia.


November 15

Nativity Fast Begins

The Nativity Fast is one of four main fast periods throughout the ecclesiastical year. Beginning on November 15 and concluding on December 24, the Nativity Fast gives individuals the opportunity to prepare for the Feast of the Nativity of Our Lord and Savior in the Flesh on December 25. By abstaining from certain food and drink, particularly from meat, fish, dairy products, olive oil, and wine, as well as focusing more deeply on prayer and almsgiving, we can find that the primary aim of fasting is to make us conscious of our dependence upon God.


Mattevng
November 16

Matthew the Apostle & Evangelist

This Apostle, who was also called Levi, was the son of Alphaeus and had Galilee as his homeland. A publican before being called by Christ, he became one of the Twelve Apostles, and an Evangelist. While still in Palestine, he wrote his Gospel first in Hebrew, being also the first of all to write the Gospel. When he is depicted in icons, there is portrayed next to him the likeness of a man, one of the symbolic living creatures mentioned by Ezekiel (1.10), which, as Saint Irenaeus writes, is a symbol of our Saviour's Incarnation.


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November 17

Gregory the Wonderworker & Bishop of Neo-Caesarea

Saint Gregory was born in Neocaesarea of Pontus to parents who were not Christians. He studied in Athens, in Alexandria, in Beirut, and finally for five years in Caesarea of Palestine under Origen, by whom he was also instructed in the Faith of Christ. Then, in the year 240, he became bishop of his own city, wherein he found only seventeen Christians. By the time the Saint reposed about the year 265, there were only seventeen unbelievers left there. Virtually the whole duration of his episcopacy was a time of continual, marvellous wonders worked by him. Because of this, he received the surname "Wonderworker"; even the enemies of the truth called him a second Moses (see Saint Basil the Great's On the Holy Spirit, ch. 29).


November 18

Holy Martyr Romanus

Saint Romanus, who was from Antioch, lived during the reign of Maximian. He presented himself before Asclepiades the Eparch, and rebuked him, saying, "The idols are not gods; even a little child could tell you that." Then the Saint asked that a child be brought in from the market, that he might be the judge of the matter at hand. Therefore, when the child was asked, "Which God must we worship?" he replied, "Christ." The child was beaten mercilessly and beheaded at the command of the tyrant. As for Saint Romanus, his tongue was cut out, and then he was cast into prison, where he was strangled in the year 305.


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Ministry News

Daily Bread Ministry

Mission:  To Spread Our Faith Through Good Works and Fighting Hunger in Our Local Community

The Daily Bread Ministry serves meals at the Presbyterian Night Shelter for the homeless on 1st and 4th Wednesdays of the month.  Please come serve.

On November 18th, we will have a guest speaker from the Fort Worth city council, Tara Perez, who is coordinating efforts to eliminate homelessness in Tarrant County.  Tara will speak to the entire Parish about where St. Demetrios can help in this effort. Please make every effort to attend this important discussion.

SCHEDULE

Wednesday Nov  28th    5:20PM – 6:30PMPresbyterian Night Shelter*

 

*The Presbyterian Night Shelter is a homeless shelter located at 2320 Poplar St. Fort Worth, TX 76113 817-632-7408 (website: http://www.journeyhome.org/).  We will meet at the Shelter at 5:10PM (gated parking is available on N. Kentucky Ave—one street over) and serve dinner at 5:20PM.  Please contact John Sempeles (682-215-3151, dfwgrimlock@yahoo.com) if interested.

 


Fellowship Hour

Accepting the task of hospitality, the patriarch [Abraham] used to sit at the entrance to his tent (cf. Gen. 18:1), inviting all who passed by, and his table was laden for all comers including the impious and barbarians, without distinction. Hence he was found worthy of that wonderful banquet when he received angels and the Master of all as guests. We too, then, should actively and eagerly cultivate hospitality, so that we may receive not only angels, but also God Himself. "For inasmuch," says the Lord, "as you have done it to one of the least of these My brethren, you have done it unto Me" (Matt. 25:40). It is good to be generous to all, especially to those who cannot repay you. St. Theodoros, the Great Ascetic

Please sign up to Host Fellowship Hour to offer hospitality to our brothers and sisters in Christ!

 


Meals on Wheels

Do you have 3 hours a week or every two weeks to spare?

We have been hosting Meals on Wheels as the Northside Distribution Center since January! Each day, 5 days a week, we feed over 100 neighbors on the Northside, Sampson Park and River Oaks areas.

We host MoWs from 9-11:30am at the church every mornng Monday- Friday. If you are interested in volunteering your time please contact Fr. Nicholas for more details:

Mission Statement

To promote the dignity and independence of older adults, persons with disabilities, and other homebound persons by delivering nutritious meals and providing or coordinating needed services.

Meals On Wheels of Tarrant County Logo

 

Client Demographics

  • Median age: 74.7 years
  • 84% of clients are over the age of 60
  • 64% of clients are female
  • Median client monthly income: $1,000
  • Meals served to minority clients: 36%
  • Average length of time a client remains on the Home-Delivered Meals program: 11 months

 


GOYA News

GOYA is still collecting cans of green beans for the NICA charity.
GOYAns who are available to meet on Saturday the 17th will deliver the food to NICA.
 
Sunday, November 18th, GOYA meeting and then bowling.
Thank you,
Sophia :)

Children's Word

Go and Do Likewise

Have you ever talked about a big plan you had? Maybe you talked about a trip you’d like to go on, or a fort you’d like to make, or a book you’d like to write. After you talked about it, did you ever have a hard time doing it?

In today’s Gospel reading, we hear the story of the Good Samaritan. You probably heard this great story when you were very little. The reading starts, “A lawyer stood up to test Jesus. Teacher, he said, what must I do to have eternal life?” Jesus asked the man what he read in the Scripture, and the man answered him. That man liked to talk about it.

Then Christ told the story of the Good Samaritan. You remember about the man who was beaten and robbed, and you remember about the Samaritan who took care of him, and who made sure the poor man grew strong and healthy again. You remember how the Samaritan did everything to help him. Then Christ told the lawyer (the one who was trying to test Him). “Go and do likewise.” He told him to act like the Samaritan helper.

Lots of times, it’s easy to talk about our plans. We can even talk about how we can be good and loving Christians! But always remember, talking about it is the easy part. Christ said, “Go and do” what the Samaritan did. That’s the hard part. But it’s the part that really matters!

SAINT MARTIN OF TOURS: THE MERCIFUL

When we read today’s Gospel reading, you might think about how you want to “go and do” what the Samaritan did.

Tomorrow, we celebrate a saint who really did “go and do likewise.” He followed Christ’s command, and he helped his neighbor.

Saint Martin of Tours (France) didn’t really want to be a soldier, but his father was in the army, so he had to too. He just wanted to live a quiet life, following Christ. Saint Martin’s life wasn’t so quiet, but he did follow Christ!

Once, he was on a trip with some other army officers. He saw a poor man, shivering in the cold, and so he gave him his warm cloak. That night he had a dream. Christ was in the dream, and he was wearing the cloak! Saint Martin knew he had done the right thing, so he was baptized as a Christian.

Saint Martin worked in the army, until he felt he could not do it any more. After that, the Church in France needed a bishop, and they chose Martin to be it! Saint Martin wanted to live his quiet life, following Christ, but he didn’t get to. He kept following Christ, of course, but he helped lead the Christians in France. St. Martin is called “the merciful” because he always showed mercy to the poor.

We celebrate St. Martin this Monday, November 12th (Nov. 25th, OC)

Click here to download your free copy of The Children’s Word.


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News in Orthodoxy

Why Should I Stop and Smell the Flowers?

11/02/2018

This year, I attended my first OCF retreat at St. Methodios Faith & Heritage Center in New Hampshire. I went along with 25 other college students from the Northeast region of the United States.

The retreat was held on a day that was brisk but not to the point where we were freezing. We lit fires every night, went hiking through the beautiful trails behind the camp, and participated in the intimacy of divine services, including Paraklesis, Vespers, and Liturgy.

The theme of the retreat was “Smell the Flowers: The Easy Path to the Kingdom”, and our service work was the perfectly unplanned task of landscaping; we planted flowers in front of the camp’s main dining hall.

The premise of the retreat was based off of a story from the book Wounded by Love, written by St. Porphyrios of Mount Athos. Briefly, St. Porphyrios was visiting the island of Patmos at the cave where St. John received the Revelation. He was overcome with grace and happiness from the Holy Spirit and wanted to escape in solitude to fully enjoy it, yet he couldn’t because of the amount of tourists surrounding him.

St. Porphyrios stepped away from the cave, in hopes to come back at a later time and experience the Holy Spirit once more. After returning to the cave, St. Porphyrios’ prayer felt dry and empty, and he did not feel the presence of the Holy Spirit. After stepping outside of the cave of Revelation, he decided to stop and smell the flowers.

He was overcome with awe and understanding when he contemplated the beauty and miracle of creation, which he experienced when he decided to take a moment to observe the flowers. St. Porphyrios came to an understanding at that time that God does not work on our time – He works in His time.

Initially, I was nervous to go on the OCF retreat, as I am currently a catechumen for the Orthodox Church and always felt as though I knew less than those around me – those already established in their faith and knowledge of the Church. To my surprise, there were other catechumens and many other converts.

The first night those who were raised within the Orthodox Church, those who have converted to the Orthodox Church, and those going through catechumenate stayed up until hours of the morning talking about our individual journeys in Orthodoxy.

This was the first time since deciding to be a part of the Church that I was surrounded by peers who were as passionate, enthusiastic, and so inspirational with their faith in Orthodoxy as I was. Conversations of faith were like wildfire that just kept burning. In the beginning, I thought to myself, “How could I be involved in these conversations of faith when there is SO much I still don’t know?”

I was comforted by the story of St. Porphyrios. Before coming a saint, before becoming a shepherd of God, he had a second-grade education. One thing I learned on this retreat is that it’s okay to not know everything and, in a sense, we will never know everything. We are all on a continuous journey, and we all have much to learn.


This post was written by Samantha Fricke, a student at the University of Binghamton. She is a senior studying psychology.


This year, I attended my first OCF retreat at St. Methodios Faith & Heritage Center in New Hampshire. I went along with 25 other college students from the Northeast region of the United States. The retreat was held on a day that was brisk but not to the point where we were freezing. We lit fires […]
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St. Demetrios Ministry Calendar

  • St. Demetrios Ministry Calendar

    November 9 to November 26, 2018

    Friday, November 9

    52nd Annual Greek Festival

    Sunday, November 11

    Prosfora: Marina Beasley

    8th Sunday of Luke

    7:00AM ushers:Stephan Papadopoulos,Tim Strong

    7:45AM Orthros

    9:00AM Divine Liturgy

    Monday, November 12

    John the Merciful, Patriarch of Alexandria

    9:00AM Meals on Wheels: Father

    Tuesday, November 13

    John Chrysostom, Archbishop of Constantinople

    9:00AM Meals on Wheels- Dr. Cliff Beasley

    6:30PM Safety ministry meeting

    Wednesday, November 14

    Philip the Apostle

    9:00AM Meals on Wheels- Biji Johnnides & Anna Panagopoulos

    Thursday, November 15

    Nativity Fast Begins

    9:00AM Meals on Wheels: Nick Kypreos

    Friday, November 16

    Matthew the Apostle & Evangelist

    9:00AM Meals on Wheels- Chelsey Papadopoulos

    Saturday, November 17

    Gregory the Wonderworker & Bishop of Neo-Caesarea

    8:30AM St Demetrios Mow day

    Sunday, November 18

    Prosphoro - Hadzellis

    9th Sunday of Luke

    7:00AM Ushers: Gus Galanis,Tigist Yemenu

    7:45AM Orthros

    9:00AM Divine Liturgy

    10:30AM Sunday Church School: Christmas Program Practice

    11:00AM Caglage fellowship Hour

    11:00AM Kiki & George Caglage 3 and 17 year Memorial

    11:30AM GOYA Meeting

    11:30AM Cleaning ministry

    12:00PM Tentative: Daily bread- Homeless presentation

    1:00PM GOYA bowling

    Monday, November 19

    Obadiah the Prophet

    9:00AM Meals on Wheels: Father

    Tuesday, November 20

    The Forefeast of the Presentation of the Theotokos into the Temple

    9:00AM Meals on Wheels: Marrlen Kime

    Wednesday, November 21

    The Entrance of the Theotokos into the Temple

    9:00AM Meals on Wheels: open

    9:00AM Divine Liturgy- Feast of the Entrance of the Theotokos

    9:00AM Divine Liturgy- Feast of the Entrance of the Theotokos

    Thursday, November 22

    Archippus the Apostle, Philemon the Apostle & his wife, Apphia, Onesimos the Disciple of Paul

    9:00AM No Meals on Wheels: Holiday

    Friday, November 23

    Amphilochius, Bishop of Iconium

    9:00AM No Meals on Wheels: Holiday

    Saturday, November 24

    Our Holy Father Clement, Pope of Rome

    Sunday, November 25

    13th Sunday of Luke

    Prosphoro- Dimitra Bakintas

    7:00AM Ushers:Paul Adamopoulos,Christine Panagopoulos

    7:45AM Orthros

    9:00AM Divine Liturgy- Feast of St. Katherine the Great Martyr

    9:00AM Divine Liturgy

    10:30AM Sunday Church School: Christmas Program Practice

    Monday, November 26

    Alypius the Stylite of Adrianopolis

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