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St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church
Publish Date: 2019-01-13
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St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church

General Information

  • Phone:
  • (817)626-5578
  • Fax:
  • (817)626-5073
  • Street Address:

  • 2020 NW 21st St.

  • Fort Worth, TX 76164-7708


Contact Information






Services Schedule

Sunday

Orthros: 8:00am

Divine Liturgy: 9:00am

Weekday/Feast Days

Orthros: 8:00am

Divine Liturgy: 9:00am

Evening Services as Scheduled: 6:00pm


Past Bulletins


Welcome to St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church

Christ is in our Midst!

He is and ever shall be!

It is a blessing to have you join us today. We hope that as you enter into the house of our Lord, you will be transformed during the Divine Liturgy through the humble prayers of the people, their expressions of faith, the all-praising hymns and the love of Jesus Christ. 

Please join us for Fellowship Hour immediately following the Divine Liturgy for some coffee and treats as well as to meet fellow parishioners. If you would like to learn more about our community and Church, you may take some brochures and take a moment to fill out a family information sheet located in the Narthex and Father Nicholas will contact you. Thank you for joining us.

 

The Mission of St. Demetrios 

to proclaim the Good News of Salvation 
through the Orthodox Christian Faith 
for the glory of our Triune God - Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

We are a loving community of believers who journey 
towards our Lord Jesus Christ and one another through our 
WORSHIP, FELLOWSHIP, EDUCATION/SPIRITUAL GROWTH, 
WITNESS, and SERVICE.  

We invite all people to join us on this journey towards the Kingdom of Heaven.

HOLY COMMUNION NOTICE:

While everyone is welcome to worship with us, Holy Communion is reserved for those who have been Baptized and/or Confirmed in the Eastern Orthodox Faith and have prepared through prayer, fasting and recent confession.

 

All Guest and Newcomers are welcome to come forward at the conclusion of the Divine Liturgy to receive the Antidoron, which is bread that has been blessed.

 

STEWARDSHIP, OFFERINGS AND ATTENDANCE 

Bringing our stewardship offerings to the house of God is part of our worship of God. Our stewardship also supports our efforts to proclaim the fullness of the Gospel of Christ in Fort Worth, Texas through our ministries and outreach. Checks should be made out to St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church, designated in the memo for Stewardship (use your stewardship envelope), and placed in the basket. Offerings for the poor and those in need (alms) should be designated in the memo for Altar Fund. (Altar Fund is the clergy discretionary fund to help those in need.) 

 

Our regular attendance

Attendance to Sunday and Weekday Divine Liturgies and other Divine Services are important for our spiritual growth and relationship with Christ as Orthodox Christians. 

 

Stewardship Donations Online: 

You can now add St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church to your online bill-pay with your bank in order to make your Stewardship Contribution Online. Simply: 1. go to your bank's website billpay 2. Add St. Demetrios as a Payee and 3. Include your envelope number in the memo/account field. It is as easy as 1, 2, 3. No more writing checks, no more envelopes! Keep your commitment, even when you are unable to attend on Sunday. You may also visit us online at www.stdemetrios.net and click Donate

 

Parents:

The worship experience is enhanced by having your children participate. Please help them learn proper behavior and reverence while in the Church. Teach them to cross themselves, venerate the Icons, & respond prayerfully “Lord have mercy.” If they become too loud, please take them to the Narthex/Quiet Room for a brief stay and return as soon as they have calmed. More Church etiquette may be found at http://www.stdemetrios.net/our-parish/church-etiquette 

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At St. Demetrios

PARISH COUNCIL USHERS

 Paul Adamopoulos & Jenna Copeland


TODAY AT ST. DEMETRIOS

40 Day Memorial for Helen Rork

Philoptochos Vasilopita Fundraiser

Sunday Church School


Fellowship Hour

Community Pot Luck


Please pray for us!

PASTORAL CARE: If you or someone you know is sick, elderly or scheduled for surgery please call the office to let us know so Fr. Nicholas can make a pastoral visit, please email him at frnicholas@stdemetrios.net.

PLEASE PRAY FOR THOSE WHO ARE SICK/RECOVERING AND ARE OUR SHUT-INS

Shut-in

Estelle Hieger

Demetrios and Maria Markos

Mache Fannin

Sophie Harbert

Katina Buster

Fannie Maulsby

Mary Nation

Ann Tsumpis

Ruth Marsh

Peter Vlahachos

Elpis Peters

Katherine Pattres

Sannie Haratsis

 

 

 

Sick/Recovering

Tina Theophilos Stokes

 Patrick Cooney

Nick Phiripes

 Peter Angeletos

Cassandra Anstadt

 

 

 


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Hymns of the Day

Resurrectional Apolytikion in the Plagal Fourth Mode

From on High did You descend, O merciful Lord, for us did You endure, three days in the tomb that we may be, released from passions in this world, You who are our resurrection and our life Glory unto You O Lord.
Ἐξ ὕψους κατῆλθες ὁ εὔσπλαγχνος, ταφὴν καταδέξω τριήμερον, ἵνα ἡμᾶς ἐλευθερώσῃς τῶν παθῶν. Ἡ ζωὴ καὶ ἡ Ἀνάστασις ἡμῶν, Κύριε δόξα σοι.

Apolytikion for Theophany Afterfeast in the First Mode

Ἐν Ἰορδάνῃ βαπτιζομένου σου Κύριε, ἡ τῆς Τριάδος ἐφανερώθη προσκύνησις, τοῦ γὰρ Γεννήτορος ἡ φωνὴ προσεμαρτύρει σοί, ἀγαπητὸν σὲ Υἱὸν ὀνομάζουσα, καὶ τὸ Πνεῦμα ἐν εἴδει περιστεράς, ἐβεβαίου τοῦ λόγου τὸ ἀσφαλές. Ὁ ἐπιφανεῖς Χριστὲ ὁ Θεός, καὶ τὸν κόσμον φωτίσας δόξα σοί.
As You were baptized in the Jordan, O Lord, then the worship of the Trinity became manifest, for the voice of the Father bore witness to You, naming You the Beloved Son; and the Spirit, in the form of a dove, confirmed the certainty of the word. O Christ God, who appeared and illumined the world, glory to You.

Seasonal Kontakion in the Fourth Mode

Ἐπεφάνης σήμερον τὴ οἰκουμένη, καὶ τὸ φῶς σου Κύριε, ἐσημειώθη ἐφ' ἡμᾶς, ἓν ἐπιγνώσει ὑμνούντάς σε. Ἦλθες ἐφάνης τὸ Φῶς τὸ ἀπρόσιτον.
You appeared today to us * on earth, O Master, * and Your light was signed on us * who cry aloud to You and say * with understanding, O Christ our God: You came and shone forth, O Light unapproachable.
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Gospel and Epistle Readings

Epistle Reading

Prokeimenon. First Mode. Psalm 32.22,1.
Let your mercy, O Lord, be upon us.
Verse: Rejoice in the Lord, O ye righteous.

The reading is from St. Paul's Letter to the Ephesians 4:7-13.

BRETHREN, grace was given to each of us according to the measure of Christ's gift. Therefore it is said, "When he ascended on high he led a host of captives, and he gave gifts to men." (in saying, "He ascended," what does it mean but that he had also descended into the lower parts of the earth? He who descended is he who also ascended far above all the heavens, that he might fill all things.) And his gifts were that some should be apostles, some prophets, some evangelists, some pastors and teachers, to equip the saints for the work of ministry, for building up the body of Christ, until we all attain to the unity of the faith and of the knowledge of the Son of God, to mature manhood, to the measure of the stature of the fullness of Christ.

Προκείμενον. First Mode. ΨΑΛΜΟΙ 32.22,1.
Γένοιτο, Κύριε, τὸ ἔλεός σου ἐφ' ἡμᾶς.
Στίχ. Ἀγαλλιᾶσθε δίκαιοι ἐν Κυρίῳ

τὸ Ἀνάγνωσμα Πρὸς Ἐφεσίους 4:7-13.

Ἀδελφοί, ἑνὶ ἑκάστῳ ἡμῶν ἐδόθη ἡ χάρις κατὰ τὸ μέτρον τῆς δωρεᾶς τοῦ Χριστοῦ. Διὸ λέγει, Ἀναβὰς εἰς ὕψος ᾐχμαλώτευσεν αἰχμαλωσίαν, καὶ ἔδωκεν δόματα τοῖς ἀνθρώποις. Τὸ δέ, Ἀνέβη, τί ἐστιν εἰ μὴ ὅτι καὶ κατέβη πρῶτον εἰς τὰ κατώτερα μέρη τῆς γῆς; Ὁ καταβάς, αὐτός ἐστιν καὶ ὁ ἀναβὰς ὑπεράνω πάντων τῶν οὐρανῶν, ἵνα πληρώσῃ τὰ πάντα. Καὶ αὐτὸς ἔδωκεν τοὺς μὲν ἀποστόλους, τοὺς δὲ προφήτας, τοὺς δὲ εὐαγγελιστάς, τοὺς δὲ ποιμένας καὶ διδασκάλους, πρὸς τὸν καταρτισμὸν τῶν ἁγίων, εἰς ἔργον διακονίας, εἰς οἰκοδομὴν τοῦ σώματος τοῦ Χριστοῦ· μέχρι καταντήσωμεν οἱ πάντες εἰς τὴν ἑνότητα τῆς πίστεως καὶ τῆς ἐπιγνώσεως τοῦ υἱοῦ τοῦ θεοῦ, εἰς ἄνδρα τέλειον, εἰς μέτρον ἡλικίας τοῦ πληρώματος τοῦ Χριστοῦ.


Gospel Reading

Sunday after Epiphany
The Reading is from Matthew 4:12-17

At that time, when Jesus heard that John had been arrested, he withdrew into Galilee; and leaving Nazareth he went and dwelt in Capernaum by the sea, in the territory of Zebulun and Naphtali, that what was spoken by the prophet Isaiah might be fulfilled: "The land of Zebulun and the land of Naphtali, toward the sea, across the Jordan, Galilee of the Gentiles, the people who sat in darkness have seen a great light, and for those who sat in the region and shadow of death light has dawned." From that time Jesus began to preach, saying, "Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand."

Sunday after Epiphany
Κατὰ Ματθαῖον 4:12-17

Τῷ καιρῷ ἐκείνῳ, ἀκούσας δὲ ὁ ᾿Ιησοῦς ὅτι ᾿Ιωάννης παρεδόθη, ἀνεχώρησεν εἰς τὴν Γαλιλαίαν, καὶ καταλιπὼν τὴν Ναζαρὲτ ἐλθὼν κατῴκησεν εἰς Καπερναοὺμ τὴν παραθαλασσίαν ἐν ὁρίοις Ζαβουλὼν καὶ Νεφθαλείμ, ἵνα πληρωθῇ τὸ ῥηθὲν διὰ ῾Ησαΐου τοῦ προφήτου λέγοντος· γῆ Ζαβουλὼν καὶ γῆ Νεφθαλείμ, ὁδὸν θαλάσσης, πέραν τοῦ ᾿Ιορδάνου, Γαλιλαία τῶν ἐθνῶν, ὁ λαὸς ὁ καθήμενος ἐν σκότειεἶδε φῶς μέγα, καὶ τοῖς καθημένοις ἐν χώρᾳ καὶ σκιᾷ θανάτουφῶς ἀνέτειλεν αὐτοῖς. ᾿Απὸ τότε ἤρξατο ὁ ᾿Ιησοῦς κηρύσσειν καὶ λέγειν· μετανοεῖτε· ἤγγικε γὰρ ἡ βασιλεία τῶν οὐρανῶν.


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Wisdom of the Fathers

For as persons not even knowing where to put a step forward, so they sat, overtaken by the darkness.
St. John Chrysostom
Homily 14 on Matthew 4, 4th Century

Take heed, then, often to come together to give thanks to God, and show forth His praise. For when ye assemble frequently in the same place, the powers of Satan are destroyed, and the destruction at which he aims is prevented by the unity of your faith.
St. Ignatius of Antioch
Epistle to the Ephesians Ch. 13, 2nd century

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Saints and Feasts

Allsaint
January 13

The Holy Martyrs Hermylus and Stratonicus

Saints Hermylus and Stratonicus contested for piety's sake during the reign of Licinius, in the year 314. Saint Hermylus was a deacon, and Stratonicus was his friend. For his confession of Christ, Hermylus was beaten so fiercely that his whole body was covered with wounds. Stratonicus, seeing him endure this and other torments that left him half dead, wept with grief for his friend. From this he was discovered to be a Christian, and when he had openly professed his Faith and had been beaten, he and Hermylus were cast into the Danube River, receiving the crown of martyrdom.


Allsaint
January 13

Hilary of Poitiers

The holy Hierarch Hilary was born of pagan parents in Gaul, and was trained in philosophy and rhetoric. At a time when paganism was still strong in Gaul, Saint Hilary understood the falsehood of polytheism, and became a Christian, and a great defender of his new Faith. About the year 350 he was ordained Bishop of Poitiers, when Arles and Milan were in the hands of the Arians and the Arian Constantius was sole Emperor. Like his contemporary Saint Athanasius, Saint Hilary's episcopate was one long struggle against the Arians. As bishop of Poitiers, Saint Hilary foresaw the future greatness of Martin (see Nov. 12), and attached him to himself. In 355, when required to agree to the condemnation of Saint Athanasius passed by the Council of Milan, Hilary wrote an epistle to Constantius convicting the wrongs done by the Arians and requesting, among other things, the restoration of the Orthodox bishops, including Athanasius. For this, Hilary was banished to Asia Minor, where he wrote his greatest work, On the Trinity. Saint Hilary returned to his see in 360, where Saint Martin sought him out again. It was this time that Saint Hilary blessed Martin to found a monastery near Poitiers, where Martin remained until being consecrated Bishop of Tours in 371. In his last years, Saint Hilary, strove for the deposition of Auxentius, the Arian Bishop of Milan, but by affecting an Orthodox confession Auxentius retained his see. Saint Hilary reposed in peace about the year 368. Auxentius died in 374 and was succeeded by Saint Ambrose, who continued Saint Hilary's battle against Arianism.

Allsaint
January 14

Sabbas (Sava), Archbishop of Serbia

Saint Sabbas (Sava), the first Archbishop and teacher of the Serbs, and the most beloved of all the Saints of Serbia, was born in 1169, and was named Rastko by his parents. He was the son of Stephen Nemanja, the ruler of Serbia, who is better known as Saint Symeon the Myrrh-streamer (see Feb. 13). As a young man, Rastko fled secretly to the Holy Mountain, Athos, to the Monastery of Saint Panteleimon. When his father learned of his flight, he sent soldiers after him. Before they could seize him, he was tonsured a monk with the name of Sabbas, after Saint Sabbas the Sanctified (celebrated Dec. 5). Soon after, he entered the Monastery of Vatopedi, where his father joined him in 1197. Together they rebuilt the Monastery of Hilandar and made it a great spiritual center for their countrymen. In 1200 Saint Symeon reposed, and his body became a source of holy myrrh; in 1204 Saint Sabbas was compelled to return to Serbia with his father's relics, that he might restore peace between his two brothers, who were struggling over the rule of the kingdom. The grace of Saint Symeon's relics, and the mediations of Saint Sabbas, healed the division between his brethren. After persuading the Emperor in Constantinople and the Ecumenical Patriarch to grant autocephaly to the Serbian Church, the Saint against his will was ordained first Archbishop of his native land in 1219, where he labored diligently to establish the Orthodox Faith. In 1221 he crowned his brother Stephen first King of Serbia (the memory of Saint Stephen, First Crowned King of Serbia, is kept on September 24). In 1234, foreseeing by divine grace his coming departure to the Lord, he resigned the archiepiscopal throne, named his disciple Arsenius as his successor, and made a pilgrimage to Jerusalem and Mount Sinai; while returning through Bulgaria, he fell asleep in peace in 1236. Because he has been ever since the national hero of Serbia and an invincible bulwark strengthening the Orthodox Faith, the Moslem Turks burned his incorrupt relics in the year 1594. See also June 28.

Jkalyvitispaulthebes
January 15

John the Hut-Dweller

Saint John, who was from Constantinople, was the son of illustrious parents -- Eutropius the Senator and Theodora. At twelve years of age he departed secretly from his home and went to the Monastery of the Unsleeping (see Dec. 29). Aflame with longing for his parents, he returned after six years to his father's home in the guise of a pauper and beggar. Living in a small hut at the gates of his parents' house (wherefrom he is called "hut-dweller"), he remained unknown therein for many years, and suffered mockery at the hands of those who had been his own servants. Foreknowing his death, he revealed himself to his parents, and within a few moments reposed, about the year 450.


Peter
January 16

Veneration of Apostle Peter's Precious Chains

Herod Agrippa, the grandson of Herod the Great and king of the Jews, grew wroth against the Church of Christ, and slew James, the brother of John the Evangelist. Seeing that this pleased the Jews, he took Peter also into custody and locked him up in prison, intending to keep him there until after the feast of the Passover, so that he could win the favour of the people by presenting him to them as a victim. But the Apostle was saved when he was miraculously set free by an Angel (Acts 12:1-19). The chains wherewith the Apostle was bound received from his most sacred body the grace of sanctification and healing, which is bestowed upon the faithful who draw nigh with faith.

That such sacred treasures work wonders and many healings is witnessed by the divine Scripture, where it speaks concerning Paul, saying that the Christians in Ephesus had such reverence for him, that his handkerchiefs and aprons, taken up with much reverence, healed the sick of their maladies: "So that from his body were brought unto the sick handkerchiefs or aprons, and the diseases departed from them, and the evil spirits went out of them" (Acts 19:12). But not only the Apostles' clothing (which certainly touched the bodies of the sick), but even their shadow alone performed healings. On beholding this, people put their sick on stretchers and beds and brought them out into the streets that, when Peter passed by, his shadow "might overshadow some of them"(Acts 5:15). From this the Orthodox Catholic Church has learned to show reverence and piety not only to the relics of their bodies, but also in the clothing of God's Saints.


17_anthony2
January 17

Anthony the Great

Saint Anthony, the Father of monks, was born in Egypt in 251 of pious parents who departed this life while he was yet young. On hearing the words of the Gospel: "If thou wilt be perfect, go and sell what thou hast, and give to the poor" (Matt. 19:21), he immediately put it into action. Distributing to the poor all he had, and fleeing from all the turmoil of the world, he departed to the desert. The manifold temptations he endured continually for the span of twenty years are incredible. His ascetic struggles by day and by night, whereby he mortified the uprisings of the passions and attained to the height of dispassion, surpass the bounds of nature; and the report of his deeds of virtue drew such a multitude to follow him that the desert was transformed into a city, while he became, so to speak, the governor, lawgiver, and master-trainer of all the citizens of this newly-formed city.

The cities of the world also enjoyed the fruit of his virtue. When the Christians were being persecuted and put to death under Maximinus in 312, he hastened to their aid and consolation. When the Church was troubled by the Arians, he went with zeal to Alexandria in 335 and struggled against them in behalf of Orthodoxy. During this time, by the grace of his words, he also turned many unbelievers to Christ.

Saint Anthony began his ascetic life outside his village of Coma in Upper Egypt, studying the ways of the ascetics and holy men there, and perfecting himself in the virtues of each until he surpassed them all. Desiring to increase his labors, he departed into the desert, and finding an abandoned fortress in the mountain, he made his dwelling in it, training himself in extreme fasting, unceasing prayer, and fierce conflicts with the demons. Here he remained, as mentioned above, about twenty years. Saint Athanasius the Great, who knew him personally and wrote his life, says that he came forth from that fortress "initiated in the mysteries and filled with the Spirit of God." Afterwards, because of the press of the faithful, who deprived him of his solitude, he was enlightened by God to journey with certain Bedouins, until he came to a mountain in the desert near the Red Sea, where he passed the remaining part of his life.

Saint Athanasius says of him that "his countenance had a great and wonderful grace. This gift also he had from the Saviour. For if he were present in a great company of monks, and any one who did not know him previously wished to see him, immediately coming forward he passed by the rest, and hurried to Anthony, as though attracted by his appearance. Yet neither in height nor breadth was he conspicuous above others, but in the serenity of his manner and the purity of his soul." So Passing his life, and becoming an example of virtue and a rule for monastics, he reposed on January 17 in the year 356, having lived altogether some 105 years.


Athncyrl
January 18

Athanasios and Cyril, Patriarchs of Alexandria

In the half-century after the First Ecumenical Council held in Nicea in 325, if there was one man whom the Arians feared and hated more intensely than any other, as being able to lay bare the whole error of their teaching, and to marshal, even from exile or hiding, the beleaguered forces of the Orthodox, it was Saint Athanasios the Great. This blazing lamp of Orthodoxy, which imperial power and heretics' plots could not quench when he shone upon the lampstand, nor find when he was hid by the people and monks of Egypt, was born in Alexandria about the year 296. He received an excellent training in Greek letters and especially in the sacred Scriptures, of which he shows an exceptional knowledge in his writings. Even as a young man he had a remarkable depth of theological understanding; he was only about twenty years old when he wrote his treatise "On the Incarnation." Saint Alexander, the Archbishop of Alexandria, brought him up in piety, ordained him his deacon, and after deposing Arius for his blasphemy against the Divinity of the Son of God, took Athanasios to the First Council in Nicea in 325. Saint Athanasios was to spend the remainder of his life laboring in defense of this Holy Council. In 326, before his death, Alexander appointed Athanasios his successor.

In 325, Arius had been condemned by the Council of Nicea; yet through his hypocritical confession of Orthodox belief, Saint Constantine the Great was persuaded by Arius's supporters that he should be received back into the communion of the Church. But Athanasios, knowing well the perverseness of his mind, and the disease of heresy lurking in his heart, refused communion with Arius. The heresiarch's followers then began framing false charges against Athanasios. Finally Saint Constantine the Great, misled by grave charges of the Saint's misconduct (which were completely false), had him exiled to Tiberius (Treves) in Gaul in 336. When Saint Constantine was succeeded by his three sons Constantine II, Constans, and Constantius, in 337, Saint Athanasios returned to Alexandria in triumph. But his enemies found an ally in Constantius, Emperor of the East, and he spent a second exile in Rome. It was ended when Constans prevailed with threats upon his brother Constantius to restore Athanasios (see also Nov. 6). For ten years Saint Athanasios strengthened Orthodoxy throughout Egypt, visiting the whole country and encouraging all: clergy, monastics, and lay folk, being loved by all as a father. After Constans's death in 350, Constantius became sole Emperor, and Athanasios was again in danger. On the evening of February 8, 356, General Syrianus with more than five thousand soldiers surrounded the church in which Athanasios was serving, and broke open the doors. Athanasios's clergy begged him to leave, but the good shepherd commanded that all the flock should withdraw first; and only when he was assured of their safety, he also, protected by divine grace, passed through the midst of the soldiers and disappeared into the deserts of Egypt, where for some six years he eluded the soldiers and spies sent after him.

When Julian the Apostate succeeded Constantius in 361, Athanasios returned again, but only for a few months. Because Athanasios had converted many pagans, and the priests of the idols in Egypt wrote to Julian that if Athanasios remained, idolatry would perish in Egypt, the heathen Emperor ordered not Athanasios's exile, but his death. Athanasios took a ship up the Nile. When he learned that his imperial pursuers were following him, he had his men turn back, and as his boat passed that of his pursuers, they asked him if he had seen Athanasios. "He is not far," he answered. After returning to Alexandria for a while, he fled again to the Thebaid until Julian's death in 363. Saint Athanasios suffered his fifth and last exile under Valens in 365, which only lasted four months because Valens, fearing a sedition among the Egyptians for their beloved Archbishop, revoked his edict in February, 366.

The great Athanasios passed the remaining seven years of his life in peace. Of his fifty-seven years as Patriarch, he had spent some seventeen in exiles. Shining from the height of his throne like a radiant evening star, and enlightening the Orthodox with the brilliance of his words for yet a little while, this much-suffering champion inclined toward the sunset of his life, and in the year 373 took his rest from his lengthy sufferings, but not before another luminary of the truth -- Basil the Great -- had risen in the East, being consecrated Archbishop of Caesarea in 370. Besides all of his other achievements, Saint Athanasios wrote the life of Saint Anthony the Great, with whom he spent time in his youth; ordained Saint Frumentius first Bishop of Ethiopia; and in his Paschal Encyclical for the year 367 set forth the books of the Old and New Testaments accepted by the Church as canonical. Saint Gregory the Theologian, in his "Oration On the Great Athanasios", said that he was "Angelic in appearance, more angelic in mind; ... rebuking with the tenderness of a father, praising with the dignity of a ruler ... Everything was harmonious, as an air upon a single lyre, and in the same key; his life, his teaching, his struggles, his dangers, his return, and his conduct after his return ... he treated so mildly and gently those who had injured him, that even they themselves, if I may say so, did not find his restoration distasteful."

Saint Cyril was also from Alexandria, born about the year 376. He was the nephew of Theophilus, Patriarch of Alexandria, who also instructed the Saint in his youth. Having first spent much time with the monks in Nitria, he later became the successor to his uncle's throne in 412. In 429, when Cyril heard tidings of the teachings of the new Patriarch of Constantinople, Nestorius, he began attempting through private letters to bring Nestorius to renounce his heretical teaching about the Incarnation. When the heresiarch did not repent, Saint Cyril, together with Pope Celestine of Rome, led the Orthodox opposition to his error. Saint Cyril presided over the Third Ecumenical Council of the 200 Holy Fathers in the year 431, who gathered in Ephesus under Saint Theodosius the Younger. At this Council, by his most wise words, he put to shame and convicted the impious doctrine of Nestorius, who, although he was in town, refused to appear before Cyril. Saint Cyril, besides overthrowing the error of Nestorius, has left to the Church full commentaries on the Gospels of Luke and John. Having shepherded the Church of Christ for thirty-two years, he reposed in 444.


Allsaint
January 19

Macarius the Great of Egypt

Saint Macarius the Great was from the Thebaid of Egypt, a disciple, as some say, of Saint Anthony the Great. He was born about 331 and struggled in asceticism in the desert at Scete. Although young, he was called "the child elder" because of his great wisdom and austere manner of life. He was ordained presbyter and reposed in 391, at the age of sixty. There are fifty homilies ascribed to him.

It is said of Saint Macarius that he became as a God upon earth, for even as God protects the whole world, so did he cover the faults he saw as if he did not see them. Once he came back to his cell to find a thief taking his things and loading them on a camel. Macarius' non-possessiveness was so great that he helped the thief load the camel. When the camel refused to rise, Macarius returned to his cell and brought a small hoe, said that the camel wanted the hoe also, loaded it on, and kicked the camel telling it to get up. The camel obeyed Macarius' command, but soon lay down again, and would not move until everything had been returned to Macarius. His contemporary, Saint Macarius of Alexandria, was so called because he came from Alexandria and was therefore of that Greek-speaking colony; while Saint Macarius the Great is also called "of Egypt," that is, he belonged to the ancient race native to Egypt, the Copts.


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Ministry News

Daily Bread Ministry

2019 Homeless Count

The Homeless Count is a comprehensive census of the homeless designed to identify how many people are homeless in Tarrant and Parker County on any given day. More than 500 volunteers are needed to help canvass urban, suburban, and rural areas of Tarrant and Parker County. Register for the 2019 Homeless Count NOW! #everyonecounts2019

Join TCHC for Homeless Count Night on Thursday, January 24, from 7pm – Midnight. We need 500 volunteers in teams of 3 to 5 to find and count unsheltered homeless persons in Tarrant and Parker counties.  #everyonecounts2018

 

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Fellowship Hour

Accepting the task of hospitality, the patriarch [Abraham] used to sit at the entrance to his tent (cf. Gen. 18:1), inviting all who passed by, and his table was laden for all comers including the impious and barbarians, without distinction. Hence he was found worthy of that wonderful banquet when he received angels and the Master of all as guests. We too, then, should actively and eagerly cultivate hospitality, so that we may receive not only angels, but also God Himself. "For inasmuch," says the Lord, "as you have done it to one of the least of these My brethren, you have done it unto Me" (Matt. 25:40). It is good to be generous to all, especially to those who cannot repay you. St. Theodoros, the Great Ascetic

Please sign up to Host Fellowship Hour to offer hospitality to our brothers and sisters in Christ!

 


Cleaning Ministry

Cleaning Ministry

The purpose of the Cleaning Ministry is to come to church once a month(3rd Sunday of the Month) to pick up after services and fellowship hour to keep our church well maintained so members and visitors have a pleasant experience.

Colossians 3:17 says, "And whatsoever you do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God and the Father by him." Even in something as "unglamorous" as cleaning the church we bring God glory if we are doing it in his name!

There are always opportunities with The Cleaning Ministry and we are always looking to grow...please join us!  See Hanan Azer or Fr. Nicholas for more information


The Great Blessing of Water (Megas Agiasmos)

Epiphany, one of the oldest and most important Feast days of the Orthodox Church, commemorates the manifestation of the Holy Trinity which took place at the Baptism of Christ in the Jordan River. Recognizing rich meaning in this event, Orthodoxy believes that when Christ was baptized, it not only marked the beginning of its public ministry and revealed the Trinity, but also signified that the entire creation is destined to share in the glory of redemption in Christ. While Christ entered into the Jordan to be baptized, two things were happening: He was identifying Himself with the people He had come to save; and, He was identifying Himself with the whole of Creation which was represented by water. Through His baptism, the Lord revealed the value of the created world and He redirected it toward its Creator. Creation is good and it belongs to God.


The Blessing of Water is held on eve of the Feast of the Epiphany and on the day itself, following the Divine Liturgy. The Blessing not only remembers the event of Our Lord's baptism and the revelation of the Holy Trinity but also expresses Orthodoxy's belief that creation is sanctified through Christ. The Blessing affirms that humanity and the created world, of which we are a part, were created to be filled with the sanctifying presence of God. After the solemn blessing, the Holy Water is distributed to the faithful and is used to bless homes during the Epiphany season. When the faithful drink the "Epiphany Water," we are reminded of our own baptism. When the Church blesses an individual, or object, or event with the water, we are affirming that those baptized, their surroundings, and their responsibilities are sanctified through Christ and brought into the Kingdom of the Father through the Spirit.

HOUSE BLESSING: Father Nicholas will be posting an area of Forth Worth Schedule to make appointments for House Blessing.

The blessing of the home takes place with prayer and the sprinkling of holy water. The priest, at this annual visit, asks God to have mercy on the house, to rid it of every evil and to fill if with every blessing. Everyone of the house, prays together for the living and the dead of the family, and all who live and have lived in the house. They all sing the hymn of salvation and process from room to room while the priest blesses the house.

Perpetration

Traditions of the ceremony differ according to local custom, but these general guidelines should are observed:

  • A candle with an icon and some holy water should be placed in a suitable place, such as kitchen or dining room table, or a home altar.

  • Also, a list of first names for whom prayers are to be offered, including members of the family and all those living in the house. The list should have a clear distinction between the living and the dead.

  • If it is the practice to give the priest a gift, it should not be placed with the holy objects on the table. It can be prepared in advanced, but given at the conclusion of the service.

The ceremony

When the priest comes, all who are present in the house should gather around the icon with the candle. They should, if they are able to join in, say the Trisagion Prayers and sing of the Troparion of the Feast of Epiphany. Then a family member leads the priest through the house. As he goes, he sprinkles holy water, and prays for a blessing upon each room and the activity that goes on there. When they have gone through the entire house, the family gathers again around the table and the priest blesses each person present.


Philoptochos

Happy New Year!
The Vasilopita (Sweet bread of Basil) is baked every year to cut on New Year’s Day. A coin is baked into the bread and it is said that whoever receives it will have good luck in the new year. However, it also means that that person should also spend that year emulating St. Basil by doing good deeds for others.
St. Basil was known as one of the great philanthropists of the church. During his lifetime he was the
founder of many hospitals, homes for the elderly and orphanages.


On January 1 and the Feast of Saint Basil, it is the annual tradition to recognize and support the work of our beloved Saint Basil Academy. St. Basil Academy is the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese home for children in need. These children come from homes in which the parents either cannot care for them at that time or are deceased. St Basil’s provides a loving Christian environment where the children are nurtured to adulthood. 

The annual Vasilopita celebrations that Philoptochos chapters throughout the country sponsor each January, are the main source of funding to assist these children. Today our Philoptochos Society will be auctioning off our Vasilopita cutting and distributing it to all of our ministries with all proceeds going to St. Basil’s Academy. Please join us and remember..it’s for the children…the future of the church.
In His Service,
Georgia Sparto
Philoptochos President


Meals on Wheels

Do you have 3 hours a week or every two weeks to spare?

We have been hosting Meals on Wheels as the Northside Distribution Center since January! Each day, 5 days a week, we feed over 100 neighbors on the Northside, Sampson Park and River Oaks areas.

We host MoWs from 9-11:30am at the church every mornng Monday- Friday. Now looking for new vollunteers for Monday and Friday, if you are interested in volunteering your time please contact Fr. Nicholas for more details:

Mission Statement

To promote the dignity and independence of older adults, persons with disabilities, and other homebound persons by delivering nutritious meals and providing or coordinating needed services.

Meals On Wheels of Tarrant County Logo

 

Client Demographics

  • Median age: 74.7 years
  • 84% of clients are over the age of 60
  • 64% of clients are female
  • Median client monthly income: $1,000
  • Meals served to minority clients: 36%
  • Average length of time a client remains on the Home-Delivered Meals program: 11 months

 


Sunday Church School

Don't forget, Sunday Church School starts up again January 13th after the Divine Liturgy.

 

God-Parent Sunday is Janaury 27th after Divine Liturgy.

This is a great opportunity to worship together with your God-paren/child and celebrate the special bond God has blessed you. Everyone will be invited to approach the Beautiful Gate and reaffirm your faith and commitment to God. 

Additionally, Evans Caglage will be taking Community, ministry, and member pictures for the New St. Demetrios Photo Directory.

Please plan to attend to put a face with a name in our new directory. 


AHEPA Presents:

Educational Presentation by AHEPA (Fort Worth Chapter)

Open to All

Tuesday, January 29, 8:00 pm

St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church

2020 NW 21st St, Fort Worth, TX 76164

 

Was There an Art of Rhetoric at Halicarnassus? A Plea for Rediscovering the Lost Centers of Classical Rhetoric

 

By

Professor Richard Leo Enos

Piper Professor, State of Texas

and Lillian Radford Chair of Rhetoric and Composition
Texas Christian University


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St. Demetrios Ministry Calendar

  • St. Demetrios Ministry Calendar

    January 13 to January 28, 2019

    Sunday, January 13

    Prosfora: Marina Beasley

    Sunday after Epiphany

    7:00AM Ushers:Chris Kime,Stephan Papadopoulos

    7:45AM Orthros

    9:00AM Divine Liturgy

    10:30AM SCS Begins and Vasilopita Cutting

    11:00AM 40 Day Memorial Eleni Rork

    11:30AM Philoptochos Meeting

    Monday, January 14

    Leavetaking of the Theophany of Our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ

    9:00AM Meals on Wheels: Ron and Elaine Kirk

    Tuesday, January 15

    John the Hut-Dweller

    9:00AM Meals on Wheels: Marrlen Kime

    Wednesday, January 16

    Veneration of Apostle Peter's Precious Chains

    9:00AM Meals on Wheels: Nick Kypreos

    Thursday, January 17

    Anthony the Great

    9:00AM Meals on Wheels: Chris & Cathy Xydas

    Friday, January 18

    Athanasios and Cyril, Patriarchs of Alexandria

    9:00AM Meals on Wheels- Terry Kouris

    Saturday, January 19

    Macarius the Great of Egypt

    Sunday, January 20

    Prosphoro - Hadzellis

    12th Sunday of Luke

    7:00AM Ushers:Paul Adamopoulos,Jenna Copeland

    7:45AM Orthros

    9:00AM Divine Liturgy

    10:30AM No Sunday Church School

    11:00AM One year Memorial: Connie Sparto

    11:30AM GOYA Meeting

    11:30AM Fellowship hour: Stavron family

    11:30AM Cleaning ministry

    Monday, January 21

    Maximus the Confessor

    9:00AM No Meals on Wheels

    Tuesday, January 22

    Timothy the Apostle of the 70

    9:00AM Meals on Wheels- Dr. Cliff Beasley

    Wednesday, January 23

    The Holy Hieromartyr Clement, Bishop of Ancyra

    9:00AM Meals on Wheels: Biji Johnnides & Anna Panagopoulos

    5:20PM Daily Bread: Presbyterian Night Shelter

    Thursday, January 24

    Xenia, Deaconess of Rome

    9:00AM Meals on Wheels: Alex Rhodes

    9:00AM Meals on Wheels: Father

    Friday, January 25

    Gregory the Theologian, Archbishop of Constantinople

    9:00AM Meals on Wheels- Kaity Sempeles

    Saturday, January 26

    Xenophon & his Companions

    Sunday, January 27

    15th Sunday of Luke

    Prosphoro- Dimitra Bakintas

    7:00AM Ushers: Christine Panagopoulos,Tim Strong

    7:45AM Orthros

    9:00AM Divine Liturgy

    10:00AM God-Parent Sunday

    11:00AM Picture day for Directory and Ministries

    Monday, January 28

    Ephraim the Syrian

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