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St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church
Publish Date: 2018-11-11
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St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church

General Information

  • Phone:
  • (781) 237-5561
  • Fax:
  • (781) 237-8612
  • Street Address:

  • 57 Brown Street

  • Weston, MA 02493


Contact Information








Services Schedule

Matins Sunday - 8:30 a.m. Weekdays - 9:00 a.m.

Liturgy Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Weekdays - 9:30 a.m.


Past Bulletins


St. Demetrios Calendar

8TH SUNDAY OF LUKE, November 11
- Orthros & Divine Liturgy, 8:30 am 
- Church School
- JOY/HOPE Care Package Assembly Event  
- GOYA Boys Navy/Blue/Girls Basketball Game, 1pm/2pm/3pm

TUESDAY, November 13
St. John Chrysostom
- Orthros & Divine Liturgy, 9 am
- Senior Guild Luncheon
- Greek School, 4 pm
- Byzantine Chant Class, 7 pm
- JOY Basketball Practice, 7:30 pm

WEDNESDAY, November 14
- Prayer Shawl Ministry, 1 pm
- Philoptochos General Assembly, 6:30 pm
- Parish Council Meeting, 7 pm

THURSDAY, November 15
- GOYA Basketball, 6 pm

SATURDAY, November 17
- Agape Prayer Group, 8:30 am
- Hellenic Nursing Home, 2 pm
- JOY Blue vs Navy Basketball Game, 5 pm
- GOYA Friendsgiving, 6 pm

8TH SUNDAY OF LUKE, November 18
- Orthros & Divine Liturgy, 8:30 am
- Church School
- Gyro Sunday
- General Assembly
- Greek Dancing
- GOYA Blue vs Navy/Girls Basketball Game, 3 pm/4 pm

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Parish News and Events

Christmas Caroling – Saturday, December 15

Please join the St. Demetrios Choir to visit homebound parishioners and bring Christmas cheer and song. Contact Genie Leussis (617) 869-5744/genieleu@gmail.com or Mary Leussis (631) 356-5895/mleussis@yahoo.com to participate. All Parishioners are welcome! Let’s celebrate the season together!

2019 GOYA SUMMER SERVICE TRIP
Planning for the 2019 GOYA Summer Service trip has begun. Our GOYAns & families will decide between the YOCAMA trip to the Navajo Nation in Gallup, New Mexico, July 6-13, or the IOCC Home Build Program in St. Augustine, FL or Houston, TX, August 5-10. Initial fundraising for the Trip begins this Saturday, November 10. Christmas Tree Ornaments will be sold during Saturday Basketball Games in the Church Hall. Please contact Georgia Argyrople for more information or questions at Georgia-argyrople@comcast.net.

ST. DEMETRIOS INNER-CITY OUTREACH 
Volunteers are needed Tuesday, November 27 for the St. Demetrios Inner-City Outreach Team which is currently helping St. Francis House in Boston, the largest  nonsectarian day shelter in the region. Transportation is  provided. Call Peter Mitsakos at 781-899-6583 or email at tpmitsakos@comcast.net.

GOYA Friendsgiving 

All of GOYA is invited on November 17th from 6:-8:30 pm for GOYA Friendsgiving dinner being held at St. Demetrios in the small hall. GOYA and GOYA Alum are encouraged to attend for an evening of fellowship and fun as we gather to thank God for all that we’ve been given, an opportunity to offer thanks for our St. Demetrios GOYA community. Friendsgiving will be a potluck, please contact Jill Kovatsis at Ja.k@verizon.net to let us know what you’re bringing. We need main dishes, salads, sides and dessert!

SENIOR GUILD

The next Luncheon of the Senior Guild will be on November 3rd (St. John Chrystostom) following Divine Liturgy. The Senior Guild will discuss the event in December. Please come and join us. If you have any questions please contact Artemis Martakis @ (508) 785-0045. The Senior Guild hopes to see you there!

HOPE & JOY CARE PACKAGE EVENT

Next Sunday, November 11, the HOPE & JOY will meet to assemble shoebox care packages for Operation Christmas Child. Donations are being collected to fill shoeboxes that will be sent to children around the world in time for Christmas. If you have toys (new or lightly used), personal care items, school supplies, craft supplies, etc. that you would like to donate please drop off in the box outside the church office window between now and next Sunday. For questions contact Anastasia Smith at Anastasia@Anastasiadesign.com  

ST. NICHOLAS GIVING TREE 

This year our parish will mark the 17th Annual St. Nicholas Giving Tree. Each year we open our hearts to the neediest children in our own area during the holiday season. On Sundays- November 18th, 25th and December  2nd the names and “wish lists” of children, all ages, under the care of the Mass. Dept. of Children and Families will be available for your family to sponsor. For questions contact Nancy Agris Savage at 508- 652-9020 or nancyasavage@gmail.com

YOUNG PROFESSIONALS NETWORKING EVENT

Save the Date: As part of the 60th Anniversary celebration, join the Young Professionals for a reunion and networking event at the Back Bay Social Club in Boston on Thursday, December 6, 6-9pm.
Invitation to follow with ticket and parking details. For more information, contact Lee Condakes (esc793@gmail.com), Evangeline Condakes (evangeline.condakes@gmail.com), or Vanessa Theoharis (or vtheoharis@gmail.com). Event proceeds will benefit the Neighbor Brigade, in memory of our beloved Parishioner, Pamela Washek.

GENERAL ASSEMBLY

This Sunday, November 4th there will be a Parish General Assembly meeting following the Divine Liturgy. It is important that our stewards are present so that we may reach quorum. Please make every effort to attend. 

VETERANS NOVEMBER TO REMEMBER DRIVE 

This year the St. Demetrios Philoptochos is seeking dona-tions in memory of 2nd Lt. Ian Thomas McVey, USMC. There are two opportunities to assist Veterans in need. Thanksgiving Meal Program, which provides a full Thanks-giving meal to a veteran’s family, and Operation Housewarming Project, which provide housewarming bas-kets to veterans transitioning to independent living. For a complete list check out the Vine or the bulletin board flyer. Donations needed by Sunday, November 18th For questions contact Chris or Eugenia Kourlos at 508-735-8866 or kourkat@comcast.net.Holiday Pops – Sunday, December 16, 2018

In celebration of the 60th Anniversary of the St. Demetrios Church, let us join together for an afternoon of fellowship and wonderful holiday music by attending the Holiday Pops Concert at Symphony Hall on Sunday, December 16, 3:00 p.m.  Tickets: $113.00 each – floor seats. Also, you may organize a table of five. To purchase tickets or for more information, contact Jane Kourtis at (781) 363-6636 or jkourtis@verizon.net

PHILOPTOCHOS

Catering for the holidays- Thanksgiving and Christmas- or any time of the year 

Philoptochos is delighted when parishioners take advantage of our St. Christine's Catering Program. We ask that you please place your orders two weeks ahead of time before to assure delivery of pastry. Please go to our St. Demetrios Website under Philoptochos and menu will be there. Thanks again for using our Philoptochos catering for the holidays.

ST. DEMETRIOS BOOKSTORE

The St. Demetrios Bookstore is open to greet the new ecclesiastical year. Take a few moments to stop by and check out our new arrivals. There are inspirational books in Greek and English for adults and children. There are also St. Demetrios crosses in gold and silver, icons, prayer bracelets, and prosfora seals from the Holy Land all suitable gifts.

60TH ANNIVERSARY RESEARCH PROJECT HELP

In celebration of its 60th anniversary, St. Demetrios is preparing an online, multi-media version of its history. In the next few months we’ll be seeking historical information from parishioners and we’ll be conducting interviews with long-time church members. We are looking for five HS seniors and/or college students with a serious interest in history or journalism to do interviews and collect materials. The selected students will receive training and equipment. Students will earn a stipend for each assignment completed. Send a brief resume and letter to Dr. Manny Paraschos at the church office by Sept. 28. Access to transportation is essential. For more information contact manoparas@gmail.com.

ST. DEMETRIOS DIRECTORY

As part of our 60th Anniversary activities, we will be publishing an updated membership directory. We will be reaching out to you for confirmation of the accuracy of your contact information (address, phone number, email etc.)

There will alo be an opportunity, as in the past, for business and underwriter support.

More information will be forthcoming. Feel free to contact Georgia Gefteas with any questions– 781-431-7479

SPONSORING FELLOWSHIP HOUR

The calendar is open for any one wishing to sponsor coffee hour this coming year. If you are interested please contact Pam Brody at 781-864-6427. 

APPEAL– CAR DONATION NEEDED

If you or anyone you know has a working car that is no longer needed consider donating it to the church for a seminarian in need. For more information contact the church office.

ST. DEMETRIOS 60TH ANNIVERSARY

2019 marks the 60th Anniversary of our St. Demetrios Community. A committee co-chaired by Peter and Stephen
Condakes has begun to think about ways to celebrate this milestone. Soon they will share some events and ways that we can all participate as we mark this joyous jubilee year of our Church. We hope our entire community will come together as one family in thanking God for our beloved St. Demetrios.

USHERING GUIDELINES

As the Church School year comes to a start, we ask that everyone assist us by waiting patiently in your seats for the children to receive Holy Communion first so that they may get to their classes.
In order to facilitate this process as efficiently as possible, we ask that Church School Teachers, Children and their parents be dismissed first for communion. All other parishioners are asked to stay in their seats and wait for the ushers to dismiss their row. We appreciate your patience and your support!

ST. DEMETRIOS ORTHO-TAXI SERVICE

We miss you when you are not with us! If you need a ride to and from church consider taking the St. Demetrios Ortho-Taxi service.  If you are interested call the church office (781-237-5561) by Friday at noon for Sunday Liturgy, or two days in advance for other services or events. You will receive a call from your driver to arrange pick-up times. The roundtrip fare is $5 to be donated to the Senior Guild.

SUNDAY GREETERS

We are looking for additional people to help greet/welcome our parishioners to church on Sunday mornings. All those who are interested in being a part of this wonderful program please contact Angel Hatgelakas through Marianne at the church office. Tel: 781-237-5561 or email: office@stdemetriosweston.org. Thank you.

USHERING

If you are interested in joining the Usher Team please contact Georgia Gefteas at gghome1@verizon.net or 978-973-7476.

WWW.GOARCH.ORG

The webpage of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America has a great amount of resources for anyone looking to learn more about the faith. You can find the daily readings of the church, information about saints, what we believe, and prayers for any occasion. Additionally, you can stay up to date with news that affects us as Christians. Be sure to check www.goarch.org regularly!

PHILOXENIA HOUSE

Located near HCHC in Brookline, the Philoxenia House offers a home and hospitality to patients and those who accompany them while they are undergoing treatment in the Boston area.  For several years a few of us visit the home twice a year to try to brighten their lives by planting flowers.  This is a joy for us.  For more information regarding this ministry please contact Betty Titus, 781.237.4748, or Eleanor Spiliakos, 978.443.3746.

WHAT IS THE ORTHODOX CHURCH

Being asked this during our festival a number of times — we as Orthodox Christians ought to respond:

“The Orthodox Christian Church is a worldwide body of believers who  confess and worship Jesus Christ as the Son of God, as Lord and Messiah. This body has a tangible and continuous history of Christian faith and practice from the time of Christ’s Apostles. The use of the adjective ‘orthodox’ to describe the Church dates back to the earliest centuries and was applied to those Christians who maintained the tradition transmitted by Christ’s Apostles (1 Thess 2:15)”

FR. MANIKAS LIBRARY

Come and visit the Fr. Manikas Library and check out one of our many books on a variety of different topics. After Divine Liturgy, please stop by the library and see what we have to offer. See Cindi Dabrowski in the library for assistance on picking out a selection to take home and further your knowledge of our faith.

DAILY READINGS APP

The Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America has developed and released a Daily Readings App for iOS and Android. It offers the daily Epistle and Gospel readings of the day as well as the saints that are commemorated on that day. Furthermore, it offers prayers,  dates of future Feast Days and fasting guidelines.

It’s a great resource that is offered by our Archdiocese. Sign into your app store and download it today!

BE THE BEE WEBSERIES 

The National Office of Youth and Young Adult Ministries offers a weekly web video series on YouTube called “Be the Bee” each week a question or theme about our faith is answered in just 5 minutes! Check out this new and interesting approach to learning about our faith! Go to: www.youtube.com/user/y2am to see the entire series! 

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Readings and Information

Today’s Epistle Reading (II Corinthians 4:6-15) is found on page 88 in your Red Liturgy Book.

Today’s Gospel Reading (Luke 10:25-37) is found on page 106 in your Red Liturgy Book.

Resurrectional Apolytikion, “By Your Cross” is found on page 172 in your Red Liturgy Book.

Thanksgiving prayers, for after Communion, are found on page 40 in your Red Liturgy Book.

TODAY’S USHERS: Georgia Gefteas, Captain; Mark Gefteas; Perry Zois; Chris Pappas; Maria Tatakis; Van Spiros;
Carolyn Spiros; Mike Krone.

TODAY’S MEMORIAL: 40 days for Nicholas Giamogianis.

TODAY’S FELLOWSHIP HOUR: is graciously hosted by the McVey Family.

TODAY’S GREETERS: Olga Newkirk.

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Gospel and Epistle Readings

Epistle Reading

Prokeimenon. Fourth Tone. Psalm 67.35,26.
God is wonderful among his saints.
Verse: Bless God in the congregations.

The reading is from St. Paul's Second Letter to the Corinthians 4:6-15.

Brethren, it is the God who said, "Let light shine out of darkness," who has shone in our hearts to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Christ.

But we have this treasure in earthen vessels, to show that the transcendent power belongs to God and not to us. We are afflicted in every way, but not crushed; perplexed, but not driven to despair; persecuted, but not forsaken; struck down, but not destroyed; always carrying in the body the death of Jesus, so that the life of Jesus may also be manifested in our bodies. For while we live we are always being given up to death for Jesus' sake, so that the life of Jesus may be manifested in our mortal flesh. So death is at work in us, but life in you.

Since we have the same spirit of faith as he had who wrote, "I believed, and so I spoke," we too believe, and so we speak, knowing that he who raised the Lord Jesus will raise us also with Jesus and bring us with you into his presence. For it is all for your sake, so that as grace extends to more and more people it may increase thanksgiving, to the glory of God.


Gospel Reading

8th Sunday of Luke
The Reading is from Luke 10:25-37

At that time, a lawyer stood up to put Jesus to the test, saying, "Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?" He said to him, "What is written in the law? How do you read?" And he answered, "You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your strength, and with all your mind; and your neighbor as yourself." And he said to him, "You have answered right; do this, and you will live."

But he, desiring to justify himself, said to Jesus, "And who is my neighbor?" Jesus replied, "A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and he fell among robbers, who stripped him and beat him, and departed, leaving him half dead. Now by chance a priest was going down that road; and when he saw him he passed by on the other side. So likewise a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. But a Samaritan, as he journeyed, came to where he was; and when he saw him, he had compassion, and went to him and bound up his wounds, pouring on oil and wine; then he set him on his own beast and brought him to an inn, and took care of him. And the next day he took out two denarii and gave them to the innkeeper, saying, 'Take care of him; and whatever more you spend, I will repay you when I come back.' Which of these three, do you think, proved neighbor to the man who fell among the robbers?" He said, "The one who showed mercy on him." And Jesus said to him, "Go and do likewise."


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Wisdom of the Fathers

For the One Maker fashioned us, the One Creator breathed life into us; we all enjoy the same sky and air, the same days and nights, and, though some be good, others bad, some righteous, others unrighteous, yet GOD is bountiful to all, kind to all.
St. Gregory the Dialogist
Sermon 12, On the Fast, 6th century

The example of the good Samaritan shows that we must not abandon those in whom even the faintest amount of faith is still alive.
St. Ambrose of Milan
Two Books of St. Ambrose, Bishop of Milan, Concerning Repentance, Chapter 11

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Hymns of the Day

Resurrectional Apolytikion in the Grave Tone

Thou didst abolish death by Thy Cross; Thou didst open Paradise to the thief; Thou didst transform the myrrh-bearers' lamentation, and didst bid Thine Apostles to preach that Thou art risen, O Christ God, granting great mercy to the world.

Apolytikion for Martyr Menas in the Fourth Tone

Thy Martyrs, O Lord, in their courageous contest for Thee received as the prize the crowns of incorruption and life from Thee, our immortal God. For since they possessed Thy strength, they cast down the tyrants and wholly destroyed the demons' strengthless presumption. O Christ God, by their prayers, save our souls, since Thou art merciful.

Apolytikion for St. Demetrios in the Third Tone

The world has found in you a great champion in time of peril, as you emerged the victor in routing the barbarians. For as you brought to naught the boasts of Lyaios, imparting courage to Nestor in the stadium, in like manner, holy one, great Martyr Demetrios, invoke Christ God for us, that He may grant us His great mercy.

Seasonal Kontakion in the Fourth Tone

Today, the most pure temple of the Savior, the precious bridal chamber and Virgin, the sacred treasure of God, enters the house of the Lord, bringing the grace of the Divine Spirit. The Angels of God praise her. She is the heavenly tabernacle.
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Saints and Feasts

November 11

Theodore the Studite

Saint Theodore the Studite was born in Constantinople in 759; his pious parents were named Photinus and Theoctiste. He assumed the monastic habit in his youth, at the monastery called Sakkoudion, and became abbot there in 794. About the year 784 he was ordained deacon, and later presbyter by the most holy Patriarch Tarasius. On joining the brotherhood of the Monastery of Studium (which was named after its founder Studius, a Roman consul), the Saint received the surname "Studite." He proved to be a fervent zealot for the traditions of the Fathers and contested even unto death for the sake of his reverence for the holy icons. He endured three exiles because of his pious zeal. During the third one, to which he was condemned by the Iconoclast autocrat, Leo the Armenian, he endured courageously - being beaten and bound and led from one dark dungeon to another - for seven whole years. Finally he was recalled from exile by Michael the Stutterer. Receiving thus a small respite from his labours of long endurance, he reposed in the Lord on November 11, 826, a Sunday, while his disciples, who stood round about him, chanted the 118th Psalm. Some say that after receiving the immaculate Mysteries, he himself began chanting this psalm. And on reaching the verse, ' I will never forget Thy statutes, for in them hast Thou quickened me" (Ps. 118:93), he gave up his spirit, having lived for sixty-seven years. In addition to his other sacred writings, he composed, with the collaboration of his brother Joseph, almost the whole of the compunctionate book of the Triodion (see also July 14).


Goodsamaritan
November 11

8th Sunday of Luke


Menas
November 11

Menas of Egypt

Saint Menas, who had Egypt as his fatherland, contested in Cotyaeion of Phrygia in 296 during the reign of Diocletian and Maximian. A soldier distinguished for his valour in war, he renounced his rank and withdrew to devote himself to ascetical struggles and prayer in the mountains. Filled with zeal and more than human courage, he presented himself in the midst of a pagan festival in Cotyaeion and declared himself to be a Christian. After terrible torments which he endured with astonishing courage, he was beheaded. His martyrium in Egypt became a place of universal pilgrimage; evidence of ancient journeys to his shrine have been found as far away as Ireland. The glory and refuge of the Christians of Egypt, he has been revealed to be a worker of great miracles and a swift defender for all who call on him with faith; besides all else, he is also invoked for help in finding lost objects.


November 11

Holy Martyr Vincent

Saint Vincent is the most illustrious of the Martyrs of Spain. Because of his virtue, he was ordained deacon by Valerius, Bishop of Saragossa, who, because of his advanced age and an impediment in his speech, commissioned Vincent to be preacher of the Gospel. In 303, the impious Emperors Diocletian and Maximian sent Dacian to Spain as governor, with an edict to persecute the clergy. Saint Vincent was brought with Bishop Valerius to Valencia; the bishop was sent into exile, but the holy deacon was tortured on a rack, and after suffering other cruel torments, gave up his soul into the hands of God on January 22 in the year 304.


Victor
November 11

Victor and Stephanie

Saints Victor and Stephanie contested in Damascus in 160, during the reign of Antoninus Pius. The pagans arrested Saint Victor as a Christian and cut off his fingers, put out his eyes, and beheaded him. As Saint Stephanie, the wife of a certain soldier, and a Christian, saw Victor's nobility in his sufferings, she loudly cried out to call him blessed and to say that she saw two crowns prepared, one for him, and one for herself. She also was taken, and was tied to two palm trees which had been bowed down; when they were released, she was torn asunder.


November 12

Nilus the Ascetic of Sinai

Saint Nilus, who had Constantinople as his homeland, was a disciple of Saint John Chrysostom. He had formerly been an eparch of the city, then became an ascetic on Mount Sinai. He wrote epistles and various ascetical works, and reposed about 451.


November 12

Martin, Bishop of Tours

Saint Martin, the great luminary of Gaul, was the son of pagan parents. When he was still quite young he became a catechumen; at the age of twenty-two he received Holy Baptism. Then he undertook the labours of a monk, and was afterwards consecrated Bishop of Tours, renowned as an ascetic and wonderworker, a faithful shepherd of Christ's flock. He converted many both from paganism and heresy, cast out demons and raised the dead, and while undertaking all the apostolic burdens of a bishop, he never ceased to be a simple monk and man of prayer. His monastery became a center of monasticism not only for Gaul, but for all of Western Europe. A widely celebrated incident of his life took place when he was still a catechumen, fulfilling his military service. Seeing an ill-clad beggar asking alms at the gate of the city of Amiens and being overlooked by passersby, Saint Martin, having nothing else to give, rent his military cloak in two with his sword and gave half to the beggar, so that he might cover himself in the cold. That night, the Lord Jesus Christ appeared to him, clothed with the half of the cloak he had given to the beggar. Saint Martin's cloak - capella in Latin - was kept in a sanctuary which came to be called capella, from which the word "chapel" is derived; and they under whose care it was kept were called cappellani, from which "chaplain" is derived. Saint Martin reposed in peace in the year 397.


November 12

Leondos Styppi, Patriarch of Constantinople


Johnmerciful
November 12

John the Merciful, Patriarch of Alexandria

Saint John was born in 555 on the island of Cyprus in the city of Amathus; his father, Epiphanius, was a ruler of Cyprus. The Saint was consecrated Archbishop of Alexandria in 608. A man of exemplary uprightness, in his zeal for Orthodoxy he strove mightily to fight the many heresies among the Christians in Egypt; but above all, he was famous for his singular generosity, humility, and sympathy towards all, especially the poor. His mercy was so great that the report of it reached the Persian invaders of Jerusalem, who desired to see him because of it. Saint John reposed in 619, at the age of sixty-four.


November 13

Damaskinos the New Martyr of Mount Athos


Johnchry
November 13

John Chrysostom, Archbishop of Constantinople

This greatest and most beloved of all Christian orators was born in Antioch the Great in the year 344 or 347; his pious parents were called Secundus and Anthusa. After his mother was widowed at the age of twenty, she devoted herself to bringing up John and his elder sister in the nurture and admonition of the Lord. John received his literary training under Anthragathius the philosopher, and Libanius the sophist, who was the greatest Greek scholar and rhetorician of his day. Libanius was a pagan, and when asked before his death whom he wished to have for his successor, he said, "John, had not the Christians stolen him from us." With such a training, and with such gifts as he had by nature, John had before him a brilliant career as a rhetorician. But through the good example of his godly mother Anthusa and of the holy Bishop Meletius of Antioch (see Feb. 12), by whom he was ordained reader about the year 370, he chose instead to dedicate himself to God. From the years 374 to 381 he lived the monastic life in the hermitages that were near Antioch. His extreme asceticism undermined his health, compelling him to return to Antioch, where Saint Meletius ordained him deacon about the year 381. Saint Meletius was called to Constantinople later that year to preside over the Second Ecumenical Council, during which he fell asleep in the Lord. In 386 Bishop Flavian ordained John presbyter of the Church of Antioch. Upon his elevation to the priesthood his career as a public preacher began, and his exceptional oratorical gifts were made manifest through his many sermons and commentaries. They are distinguished by their eloquence and the remarkable ease with which rich imagery and scriptural allusions are multiplied; by their depth of insight into the meaning of Scripture and the workings of God's providence; and, not least of all, by their earnestness and moral force, which issue from the heart of a blameless and guileless man who lived first what he preached to others. Because of his fame, he was chosen to succeed Saint Nectarius as Patriarch of Constantinople. He was taken away by stealth, to avoid the opposition of the people, and consecrated Patriarch of Constantinople on February 28, 398, by Theophilus, Patriarch of Alexandria, who was to prove his mortal enemy.

At that time the Emperor of the East was Arcadius, who had had Saint Arsenius the Great as his tutor (see May 8); Arcadius was a man of weak character, and much under the influence of his wife Eudoxia. The zealous and upright Chrysostom's unsparing censures of the lax morals in the imperial city stung the vain Eudoxia; through Theophilus' plottings and her collaboration, Saint John was banished to Pontus in 403. The people were in an uproar, and the following night an earthquake shook the city; this so frightened the Empress Eudoxia that she begged Arcadius to call Chrysostom back. While his return was triumphant, his reconciliation with the Empress did not last long. When she had a silver statue of herself erected in the forum before the Church of the Holy Wisdom (Saint Sophia) in September of 403, and had it dedicated with much unseemly revelry, Saint John thundered against her, and she could not forgive him. In June of 404 he was exiled to Cucusus, on the borders of Cilicia and Armenia. From here he exchanged letters with Pope Innocent of Rome, who sent bishops and priests to Constantinople requesting that a council be held. Saint John's enemies, dreading his return, prevailed upon the Emperor to see an insult in this, and had John taken to a more remote place of banishment called Pityus near the Caucasus. The journey was filled with bitter sufferings for the aged bishop, both because of the harshness of the elements and the cruelty of one of his 310 guards. He did not reach Pityus, but gave up his soul to the Lord near Comana in Pontus, at the chapel of the Martyr Basiliscus (see May 22), who had appeared to him shortly before, foretelling the day of his death, which came to pass on September 14, 407. His last words were "Glory be to God for all things." His holy relics were brought from Comana to Constantinople thirty-one years later by the Emperor Theodosius the Younger and Saint Pulcheria his sister, the children of Arcadius and Eudoxia, with fervent supplications that the sin of their parents against him be forgiven; this return of his holy relics is celebrated on January 27.

Saint John was surnamed Chrysostom ("Golden-mouth") because of his eloquence. He made exhaustive commentaries on the divine Scriptures and was the author of more works than any other Church Father, leaving us complete commentaries on the Book of Genesis, the Gospels of Saints Matthew and John, the Acts, and all the Epistles of Saint Paul. His extant works are 1,447 sermons and 240 epistles. Twenty-two teachers of the Church have written homilies of praise in his honour. Besides his feasts today and on January 27, he is celebrated as one of the Three Hierarchs on January 30, together with Saint Basil the Great and Saint Gregory the Theologian.

It should be noted that, because September 14 is the Exaltation of the Cross, the Saint's memory has been transferred to this day.


November 13

Anthousa, the Mother of John Chrysostom


Philipapostle
November 14

Philip the Apostle

This Apostle, one of the Twelve, was from Bethsaida of Galilee, and was a compatriot of Andrew and Peter. He was instructed in the teachings of the Law, and devoted himself to the study of the prophetic books. Therefore, when the Lord Jesus called him to the dignity of apostleship, he immediately sought out and found Nathanael and said to him, "We have found Him of Whom Moses in the Law and the Prophets did write, Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph" (John 1.45). Having preached Jesus the God-man throughout many parts of Asia Minor, and having suffered many things for His Name's sake, he was finally crucified upside down in Hierapolis of Phrygia.


Gregpala
November 14

Gregory Palamas, Archbishop of Thessaloniki

This divine Father, who was from Asia Minor, was from childhood reared in the royal court of Constantinople, where he was instructed in both religious and secular wisdom. Later, while still a youth, he left the imperial court and struggled in asceticism on Mount Athos, and in the Skete at Beroea. He spent some time in Thessalonica being treated for an illness that came from his harsh manner of life. He was present in Constantinople at the Council that was convened in 1341 against Barlaam of Calabria, and at the Council of 1347 against Acindynus, who was of like mind with Barlaam; Barlaam and Acindynus claimed that the grace of God is created. At both these Councils, the Saint contended courageously for the true dogmas of the Church of Christ, teaching in particular that divine grace is not created, but is the uncreated energies of God which are poured forth throughout creation: otherwise it would be impossible, if grace were created, for man to have genuine communion with the uncreated God. In 1347 he was appointed Metropolitan of Thessalonica. He tended his flock in an apostolic manner for some twelve years, and wrote many books and treatises on the most exalted doctrines of our Faith; and having lived for a total of sixty-three years, he reposed in the Lord in 1359.His holy relics are kept in the Cathedral of Thessalonica.

Constantinenewmartyr
November 14

Holy Great New Martyr Constantine of Hydra

Constantine was born on the island of Hydra in the 18th century. Born to a pious Orthodox Christian family, he left the island to the city of Rhodes in order to find work. There he worked for the Turkish governer and converted to Islam. He soon repented and returned to his Christian faith and lived on Mt Athos for a period of time as a monastic.  He returned to Rhodes to confront the governor and confess his Christian faith. He died the death of a martyr by being beheaded on November 14, 1800.


November 14

Justinian the Emperor and his wife Theodora


November 15

Thursday of the 9th Week


November 15

Nativity Fast Begins

The Nativity Fast is one of four main fast periods throughout the ecclesiastical year. Beginning on November 15 and concluding on December 24, the Nativity Fast gives individuals the opportunity to prepare for the Feast of the Nativity of Our Lord and Savior in the Flesh on December 25. By abstaining from certain food and drink, particularly from meat, fish, dairy products, olive oil, and wine, as well as focusing more deeply on prayer and almsgiving, we can find that the primary aim of fasting is to make us conscious of our dependence upon God.


November 15

Guria, Shamuna, and Habib, Martyrs and Confessors of Edessa

Of these most illustrious Martyrs of the city of Edessa in Syria, Guria and Shamuna contested during the reign of Diocletian, in 288; after many tortures, they were cast into prison, then beheaded. Saint Habib, a deacon, contested in the days of Licinius, in the year 316, and was burned alive; he was buried with Saints Guria and Shamuna. The three have one common feast, and it is always together that they are portrayed in icons and invoked by the faithful.On account of a renowned miracle they worked, they are invoked for help in marital difficulties. A certain Goth had come with the Roman army to Edessa and was quartered in the house of a pious widow named Sophia. The Goth asked Sophia for the hand of her daughter, Euphemia; after resisting for a long time, Sophia at last agreed. When it was time for the army to return home, Sophia made the Goth vow by the power in the holy Martyrs Shamuna, Guria, and Habib, to keep Euphemia as the apple of his eye. As he was nearing his home, however, the treacherous man revealed to Euphemia that he already had a wife. Euphemia was compelled to serve the Goths wife, who dealt with her mercilessly. After extreme sufferings, which included being sealed alive in a tomb and left there to die, Euphemia was miraculously conveyed to Edessa, to the very shrine of the holy Martyrs whose surety they had taken, and was reunited with her mother through their holy prayers.


November 15

Thomas, Archbishop of Constantinople


Mattevng
November 16

Matthew the Apostle & Evangelist

This Apostle, who was also called Levi, was the son of Alphaeus and had Galilee as his homeland. A publican before being called by Christ, he became one of the Twelve Apostles, and an Evangelist. While still in Palestine, he wrote his Gospel first in Hebrew, being also the first of all to write the Gospel. When he is depicted in icons, there is portrayed next to him the likeness of a man, one of the symbolic living creatures mentioned by Ezekiel (1.10), which, as Saint Irenaeus writes, is a symbol of our Saviour's Incarnation.


November 17

Saturday of the 9th Week


Gregwonderjohnmercy
November 17

Gregory the Wonderworker & Bishop of Neo-Caesarea

Saint Gregory was born in Neocaesarea of Pontus to parents who were not Christians. He studied in Athens, in Alexandria, in Beirut, and finally for five years in Caesarea of Palestine under Origen, by whom he was also instructed in the Faith of Christ. Then, in the year 240, he became bishop of his own city, wherein he found only seventeen Christians. By the time the Saint reposed about the year 265, there were only seventeen unbelievers left there. Virtually the whole duration of his episcopacy was a time of continual, marvellous wonders worked by him. Because of this, he received the surname "Wonderworker"; even the enemies of the truth called him a second Moses (see Saint Basil the Great's On the Holy Spirit, ch. 29).


November 17

Gennadios I and Maximus, Patriarchs of Constantinople


November 17

Righteous Mother Hilda of Whitby

Our righteous Mother Hilda was of noble birth, being a kinswoman of Saint Edwin, King of Northumbria (celebrated Oct. 12). At the age of thirty-three she renounced the world, and lived another thirty-three years as a nun and abbess. The last six years of her life she suffered a burning fever with patience and nobility, and reposed in peace in the year 680.


18_lukewriting
November 18

9th Sunday of Luke


Platon
November 18

Plato the Great Martyr of Ancyra

Saint Plato contested in martyrdom in 266, when Agrippinus was proconsul. He was from the city of Ancyra in the province of Galatia.


November 18

Holy Martyr Romanus

Saint Romanus, who was from Antioch, lived during the reign of Maximian. He presented himself before Asclepiades the Eparch, and rebuked him, saying, "The idols are not gods; even a little child could tell you that." Then the Saint asked that a child be brought in from the market, that he might be the judge of the matter at hand. Therefore, when the child was asked, "Which God must we worship?" he replied, "Christ." The child was beaten mercilessly and beheaded at the command of the tyrant. As for Saint Romanus, his tongue was cut out, and then he was cast into prison, where he was strangled in the year 305.


November 18

Zaccheus the Deacon


November 18

Holy New Martyr Anastasius of Paramythia


November 18

Martyr Romanos the Deacon


November 18

Anastasios the New Martyr


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