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Assumption of the Virgin Mary Orthodox Church
Publish Date: 2021-02-21
Bulletin Contents
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Assumption of the Virgin Mary Orthodox Church

General Information

  • Phone:
  • 7179193382
  • Street Address:

  • 801 Montecito Drive

  • San Angelo, TX 76903


Contact Information




Services Schedule

All Morning Services 9 AM • All Evening Services 6 PM
Wednesdays 6 PM Bible Study (Year-Round) & Church School (September - May)
Fridays 6 PM Choir Practice for All (September - May)


Past Bulletins


Calendar & Announcements

Announcements for February 21, 2021

Services for Sunday, February 21, are at the NORMAL times. 9:00 Orthros, 10:00 Divine Liturgy. The plumbing at church survived the storm. Thanks be to God!

Reminder: Whenever we cannot attend church services, we should still find a way to worship God. You can pray these Morning Prayers during that time. The morning prayers are also good way to start every day. Here are some Evening Prayers for you too. "A day hemmed in prayer rarely comes unravelled." 

 

Our deepest condolences are offered to Yana Crusberg and her family, on the passing of her mother, Liliia Zharova. 
☦︎
Many of you will remember Liliia from her visits here. She was good and kind and will be greatly missed. May her memory be eternal! Please pray for Liliia's repose. We will hold a  memorial for her today.

 

Calendar:

  • Today, February 21, we begin the Triodion leading up to Pascha. That means this is a Fast-Free Week. No fasting at all, not even on Wednesday and Friday. For a complete calendar of the upcoming Journey to Pascha, see the "Calendar & Worship Services" page on the parish website.

  • Today, February 21, we will have a 3-day memorial for Liliia Zharova, following Divine Liturgy.

  • March 7, we will have 40-day memorials for Col. Steve Tefas, Sr., and Dr. Clinton Crusberg.​ The memorial service will be at the end of Sunday liturgy. The Orthodox tradition is to hold memorials on the 3rd, 9th, and 40th days of a person's repose, and then yearly on the anniversary dates after that. For more information about memorial traditions and koliva, see this Orthodoxwiki article.

  • The Wednesday discussion group is exploring an interesting topic, about dealing with the times we live in. If you would like to join the discussion group, please contact Tony Bartl, who is leading the topic. (You can also leave a message through the Contact page on the church website, OrthodoxSanAngelo.org.) We are reading and discussing Rod Dreher's recent book, Live Not by Lies: a Manual for Christian Dissidents. Everyone is welcome to participate, including non-Orthodox, so invite your friends. Both online and in-person options are available. 

  • Read Ahead: This year's Lenten theme will revolve around the 6 Commands of Jesus found in Matthew 25: 31-46. Take a look at Matthew chapter 25, and see if you can spot them.

 

Special Occasions This Week

  • Birthdays: none this week

  • Anniversaries: none this week

  • Namedays: none this week

  • Memorials: none this week

 

Saints for the Week: We have many saints with interesting write-ups in this week's bulletin. Be sure to check out the rest of this bulletin, online on the church's website, OrthodoxSanAngelo.org

 

Other Announcements:

  • Send your prayer requests to Fr. Mark.

  • We need more chanters and readers. If you are interested in chanting or reading for the Church — or in learning how — please see Fr. Mark.

  • Calling all bakers! We need more people to bake prosforo. Fresh altar bread is much preferred, and taking time to knead and bake it while praying is a special gift that you can do for God. The ingredients are simple and inexpensive. Please contact Fr. Mark if you'd like to get the recipe or learn how to make it. Also, if you need a seal, Fr. Mark has one to loan to a prospective baker until they can purchase their own.

  • Are you taking up a new hobby in the New Year? Presbytera Krista West now offers folk embroidery kits and patterns inspired by traditional motifs and designs from many Orthodox lands (Greek, Balkan, Ukrainian, and more.). Presbytera Krista is the ecclesiastical tailor who sewed many of Fr. Mark's vestments, and the pandemic has been extremely hard on her business. You could help her keep ecclesiastical tailoring alive (only a small number of people offer this service, in the whole world) by supporting her business. Please visit her Avlea Folk Embroidery website, www.avlea.life. Her embroidery kits and patterns are wonderful for decorating your home or icon corner. They also make gifts that will be appreciated for years to come, because of their beauty and high quality. 

** As always, see the parish website for any changes and updates. **

 

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Gospel and Epistle Readings

Matins Gospel Reading

Fourth Orthros Gospel
The Reading is from Luke 24:1-12

On the first day of the week, at early dawn, the women went to the tomb, taking the spices which they had prepared. And they found the stone rolled away from the tomb, but when they went in they did not find the body. While they were perplexed about this, behold, two men stood by them in dazzling apparel; and as they were frightened and bowed their faces to the ground, the men said to them, "Why do you seek the living among the dead? Remember how he told you, while he was still in Galilee, that the Son of man must be delivered in to the hands of sinful men, and be crucified, and on the third day rise." And they remembered his words, and returning from the tomb they told all this to the eleven and to all the rest. Now it was Mary Magdalene, and Joanna and Mary the mother of James and the other women with them who told this to the apostles; but these words seemed to them an idle tale, and they did not believe them.

But Peter rose and ran to the tomb; stooping and looking in, he saw the linen cloths by themselves; and he went home wondering at what had happened.


Epistle Reading

Sunday of the Publican and Pharisee: Triodion Begins Today
The Reading is from St. Paul's Second Letter to Timothy 3:10-15

TIMOTHY, my son, you have observed my teaching, my conduct, my aim in life, my faith, my patience, my love, my steadfastness, my persecutions, my sufferings, what befell me at Antioch, at lconion, and at Lystra, what persecutions I endured; yet from them all the Lord rescued me. Indeed all who desire to live a godly life in Christ Jesus will be persecuted, while evil men and impostors will go on from bad to worse, deceivers and deceived. But as for you, continue in what you have learned and have firmly believed, knowing from whom you learned it and how from childhood you have been acquainted with the sacred writings which are able to instruct you for salvation through faith in Christ Jesus.


Gospel Reading

Sunday of the Publican and Pharisee: Triodion Begins Today
The Reading is from Luke 18:10-14

The Lord said this parable, "Two men went up into the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. The Pharisee stood and prayed thus with himself, 'God, I thank you that I am not like other men, extortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. I fast twice a week, I give tithes of all that I get.' But the tax collector, standing far off, would not even lift up his eyes to heaven, but beat his breast, saying, 'God, be merciful to me a sinner!' I tell you, this man went down to his house justified rather than the other; for everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, but he who humbles himself will be exalted."


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Hymns of the Day

Resurrectional Apolytikion in the 4th Tone

The joyful news of your resurrection was proclaimed by the angel to the women disciples. Having thrown off the curse that fell on Adam, they ran elatedly to tell the apostles: Death has been vanquished; Christ our God is risen from the dead, blessing all the world with his great mercy.

Apolytikion Hymn of Our Parish: for the Dormition of the Theotokos, in the 1st Tone

In giving birth you remained a virgin.  
And in your dormition, you did not forsake the world, 
O Theotokos.  
For as the Mother of Life, you have yourself passed into life.  
And by your prayers, you deliver our souls from death.

Seasonal Kontakion in the 4th Tone

Let us flee the boastful words of the pharisee and learn humility from the sights of the publican; let us cry out to the Savior: Spare us, for you alone are rich in forgiveness.
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Saints and Feasts

Publphar
February 21

Sunday of the Publican and Pharisee: Triodion Begins Today

The Pharisees were an ancient and outstanding sect among the Jews known for their diligent observance of the outward matters of the Law. Although, according to the word of our Lord, they "did all their works to be seen of men" (Matt. 23:5), and were hypocrites (ibid. 23: 13, 14, 15, etc.), because of the apparent holiness of their lives they were thought by all to be righteous, and separate from others, which is what the name Pharisee means. On the other hand, Publicans, collectors of the royal taxes, committed many injustices and extortions for filthy lucre's sake, and all held them to be sinners and unjust. It was therefore according to common opinion that the Lord Jesus in His parable signified a virtuous person by a Pharisee, and a sinner by a Publican, to teach His disciples the harm of pride and the profit of humble-mindedness.

Since the chief weapon for virtue is humility, and the greatest hindrance to it is pride, the divine Fathers have set these three weeks before the Forty-day Fast as a preparation for the spiritual struggles of virtue. This present week they have called Harbinger, since it declares that the Fast is approaching; and they set humility as the foundation for all our spiritual labors by appointing that the parable of the Publican and the Pharisee be read today, even before the Fast begins, to teach, through the vaunting of the Pharisee, that the foul smoke of self-esteem and the stench of boasting drives away the grace of the Spirit, strips man of all his virtue, and casts him into the pits of Hades; and, through the repentance and contrite prayer of the Publican, that humility confers upon the sinner forgiveness of all his wicked deeds and raises him up to the greatest heights.

All foods are allowed the week that follows this Sunday.


Allsaint
February 21

Timothy the Righteous

Saint Timothy took up the monastic life from his youth, became a vessel of the Holy Spirit, and reposed in deep old age.


Allsaint
February 21

John III, Patriarch of Constantinople


Allsaint
February 21

Zachariah, Patriarch of Jerusalem


Allsaint
February 21

Eustathius, Bishop of Antioch

Saint Eustathius, the great defender of piety and illustrious opponent of Arianism, was from Side in Pamphylia. He became Bishop of Beroea (the present-day Aleppo), and in 325 was present at the First Ecumenical Council. From thence he was transferred to the throne of Antioch. But Saint Constantine the Great, led astray by the slanders directed against the Saint by the Arians, banished him to Trajanopolis in Thrace, where he reposed in 337, according to some. Others say he lived until 360.


Allsaint
February 22

The Finding of the Precious Relics of the Holy Martyrs in the Quarter of Eugenius

The holy relics of these Saints were found in the quarter of Constantinople called Eugenius when Thomas was Patriarch of that city (607-610).


Allsaint
February 22

Monday of Prodigal Son


Allsaint
February 23

Polycarp the Holy Martyr & Bishop of Smyrna

This apostolic and prophetic man, and model of faith and truth, was a disciple of John the Evangelist, successor of Bucolus (Feb. 6), and teacher of Irenaeus (Aug. 23). He was an old man and full of days when the fifth persecution was raised against the Christians under Marcus Aurelius. When his pursuers, sent by the ruler, found Polycarp, he commanded that they be given something to eat and drink, then asked them to give him an hour to pray; he stood and prayed, full of grace, for two hours, so that his captors repented that they had come against so venerable a man. He was brought by the Proconsul of Smyrna into the stadium and was commanded, "Swear by the fortune of Caesar; repent, and say, 'Away with the atheists.'" By atheists, the Proconsul meant the Christians. But Polycarp, gazing at the heathen in the stadium, waved his hand towards them and said, "Away with the atheists." When the Proconsul urged him to blaspheme against Christ, he said: "I have been serving Christ for eighty-six years, and He has wronged me in nothing; how can I blaspheme my King Who has saved me?" But the tyrant became enraged at these words and commanded that he be cast into the fire, and thus he gloriously expired about the year 163. As Eusebius says, "Polycarp everywhere taught what he had also learned from the Apostles, which also the Church has handed down; and this alone is true" (Eccl. Hist., Book IV, ch. 14,15).


07_john2
February 24

First & Second Finding of the Venerable Head of John the Baptist

The first finding came to pass during the middle years of the fourth century, through a revelation of the holy Forerunner to two monks, who came to Jerusalem to worship our Saviour's Tomb. One of them took the venerable head in a clay jar to Emesa in Syria. After his death it went from the hands of one person to another, until it came into the possession of a certain priest-monk named Eustathius, an Arian. Because he ascribed to his own false belief the miracles wrought through the relic of the holy Baptist, he was driven from the cave in which he dwelt, and by dispensation forsook the holy head, which was again made known through a revelation of Saint John, and was found in a water jar, about the year 430, in the days of the Emperor Theodosius the Younger, when Uranius was Bishop of Emesa.


Allsaint
February 25

Tarasius, Patriarch of Constantinople

This Saint was the son of one of the foremost princes in Constantinople, and was originally a consul and first among the Emperor's private counselors. Then, in 784, he was elected Patriarch of Constantinople by the Sovereigns Irene and her son Constantine Porphyrogenitus. He convoked the Seventh Ecumenical Council that upheld the holy icons, and became the boast of the Church and a light to the clergy. He reposed in 806.


Allsaint
February 26

Porphyrius, Bishop of Gaza

Saint Porphyrius had Thessalonica as his homeland. He became a monk in Scete of Egypt, where he lived for five years. He went on pilgrimage to Jerusalem, after which he spent five years in much affliction in a cave near the Jordan. Stricken with a disease of the liver, he departed to Jerusalem, where he was ordained presbyter and appointed Keeper of the Cross at the age of 45. Three years later he was made Bishop of Gaza. He suffered much from the rulers and pagans of Gaza; but with the friendship of Saint John Chrysostom, and the patronage of the Empress Eudoxia, he razed the temple of the idol Marnas in Gaza and built a great church to the glory of God. He reposed in 450.


Photini
February 26

The Holy Great Martyr Photine, the Samaritan Women

Saint Photine was the Samaritan Woman who encountered Christ our Saviour at Jacob's Well (John 4:1-42). Afterwards she laboured in the spread of the Gospel in various places, and finally received the crown of martyrdom in Rome with her two sons and five sisters, during the persecutions under the Emperor Nero.


Theocletus
February 26

Holy Martyr Theocletus


Allsaint
February 27

Procopius the Confessor of Decapolis

Saints Procopius and Basil, fellow ascetics, lived about the middle of the eighth century, during the reign of Leo the Isaurian (717-741), from whom they suffered many things for the sake of the veneration of the holy icons. They ended their lives in the ascetical discipline.


Prodson
February 28

Sunday of the Prodigal Son

Through the parable of today's Gospel, our Saviour has set forth three things for us: the condition of the sinner, the rule of repentance, and the greatness of God's compassion. The divine Fathers have put this reading the week after the parable of the Publican and Pharisee so that, seeing in the person of the Prodigal Son our own wretched condition -- inasmuch as we are sunken in sin, far from God and His Mysteries -- we might at last come to our senses and make haste to return to Him by repentance during these holy days of the Fast.

Furthermore, those who have wrought many great iniquities, and have persisted in them for a long time, oftentimes fall into despair, thinking that there can no longer be any forgiveness for them; and so being without hope, they fall every day into the same and even worse iniquities. Therefore, the divine Fathers, that they might root out the passion of despair from the hearts of such people, and rouse them to the deeds of virtue, have set the present parable at the forecourts of the Fast, to show them the surpassing goodness of God's compassion, and to teach them that there is no sin -- no matter how great it may be -- that can overcome at any time His love for man.


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Wisdom of the Fathers

It is possible for those who have come back again after repentance to shine with much lustre, and oftentimes more than those who have never fallen at all, as I have demonstrated from the divine writings. Thus at least both the publicans and the harlots inherit the kingdom of Heaven, and thus many of the last are placed before the first.
St. John Chrysostom
AN EXHORTATION TO THEODORE AFTER HIS FALL, 4th Century

When lately we made mention of the Pharisee and the publican, and hypothetically yoked two chariots out of virtue and vice; we pointed out each truth, how great is the gain of humbleness of mind, and how great the damage of pride.
St. John Chrysostom
CONCERNING LOWLINESS OF MIND., 4th Century

To the end then, that when we have gone through the labour of fasting, we forfeit not the crown of fasting, we should understand how, and after what manner, it is necessary to conduct this business; since that Pharisee also fasted, but afterwards went down empty, and destitute of the fruit of fasting.
St. John Chrysostom
Homily III, 4th Century

But all the same since he made his soul contrite, and called himself a sinner; which indeed he was; he surpassed the Pharisee, who had both fastings to tell of and tithes; and was removed from any vice. ... Because even if he was removed from greed of gain and robbery, he had rooted over his soul the mother of all evils -- vain-glory and pride.
St. John Chrysostom
CONCERNING LOWLINESS OF MIND., 4th Century

For this [pride], even when conjoined with righteousness and fastings and tithes, fell behind; while that [humility], even when yoked with sin, outstripped the Pharisee's pair, even although the charioteer it had was a poor one. For what was worse than the publican?
St. John Chrysostom
CONCERNING LOWLINESS OF MIND., 4th Century

If there is a moral quality almost completely disregarded and even denied today, it is indeed humility. The culture in which we live constantly instills in us the sense of pride, of self-glorification, and of self-righteousness ... Even our churches - are they not imbued with that same spirit of the Pharisee? Do we not want our every contribution, every 'good deed,' all the we do 'for the Church' to be acknowledged, praised, publicized? ... How does one become humble? The answer, for a Christian, is simple: by contemplating Christ..."
Fr. Alexander Schmemann
Great Lent, pp. 19-20., 20th Century

The Publican fasted not; and yet he was accepted in preference to him who had fasted; in order that thou mayest learn that fasting is unprofitable, unless all other duties follow with it.
St. John Chrysostom
Homily III, 4th Century

For the nature of a fast is such that it does not suffice to deliver those who practise it, unless it be done according to a suitable law. "For the wrestler," it is said, "is not crowned unless he strive lawfully."
St. John Chrysostom
Homily III, 4th Century

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