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Assumption of the Virgin Mary Orthodox Church
Publish Date: 2021-03-07
Bulletin Contents
Lastjudgement1
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Assumption of the Virgin Mary Orthodox Church

General Information

  • Phone:
  • 7179193382
  • Street Address:

  • 801 Montecito Drive

  • San Angelo, TX 76903


Contact Information




Services Schedule

All Morning Services 9 AM • All Evening Services 6 PM
Wednesdays 6 PM Bible Study (Year-Round) & Church School (September - May)
Fridays 6 PM Choir Practice for All (September - May)


Past Bulletins


Calendar & Announcements

Announcements for March 7, 2021

Important: Everyone needs to read Encyclical #29 from Met. Isaiah, entitled "Regarding Suicides and Cremation."

Great Lent starts in one week, so this is Meatfare Sunday — our last day for eating meat before Lent. Starting tomorrow, we will have Cheesefare Week — no meat, but a time to celebrate with dairy and egg dishes. For a complete calendar of the upcoming Journey to Pascha, see the "Calendar & Worship Services" page on the parish website. 

Important note: If you plan to receive communion on Pascha, you should make a confession during the Lenten period. Please contact Fr. Mark to arrange an appointment.

Calendar:

  • Today, following Divine Liturgy, we will have the 40-day memorials for Col. Steve Tefas, Sr., and Dr. Clinton Crusberg.​ The Orthodox tradition is to hold memorials on the 3rd, 9th, and 40th days of a person's repose, and then yearly on the anniversary dates after that. For more information about memorial traditions and koliva, see this Orthodoxwiki article.

  • The last two Saturday of Souls services will be held March 13 & 20, at 9am. Please submit names, particularly if you have not submitted them in prior years of Fr. Mark's service here.  He keeps a list and adds to it as names come in, but if there are new ones you've not informed him about, he'll need those so he can pray for them.

  • Thursday, March 25, we will hold services to celebrate the Annunciation by the Archangel Gabriel to Mary, telling her that she was to become the Mother of God. (See here for a video explanation). 9am Orthros and 10am Liturgy.

  • Great Lent Starts on Monday, March 15, so we will hold Compline that day. 
    • Forgiveness Vespers will be held immediately after Divine Liturgy on Sunday, March 14.
    • Compline will be held at 6pm on Monday, March 15.
    • Presanctified Liturgies will be held at 6pm on Wednesdays in Lent: March 17, 24, 31, April 7, 14, 21. 
    • Akathist hymns will be sung at 6pm on the first 5 Fridays of Lent: March 19, 26, April 2, 9, 16.

  • Pascha is Sunday, May 2.
    • Plan to attend Liturgy for Lazarus Saturday, April 24, at 9am.  Palm Sunday is the following day, April 25, which is also St. Mark's day.  
    • See the website's "Schedule" page for the typical Holy Week Schedule.

 

Special Occasions This Week

  • Birthdays: none this week
  • Anniversaries: Fr. Mark's ordination to the priesthood (11 years on March 6)
  • Namedays: none this week
  • Memorials: Steve Tefas, Clinton Crusberg

 

Saints for the Week: We have many saints with interesting write-ups in this week's bulletin. Be sure to check out the rest of this bulletin, online on the church's website, OrthodoxSanAngelo.org

 

Other Announcements:

  • Calling all Christians!  Register today! A "can't miss" opportunity begins in just three weeks as we launch a new lecture series titled "Cultivating the Fundamentals of the Christian Life". His Eminence Metropolitan Savas and the Metropolis of Pittsburgh Religious Education Commission are excited to share in this lecture series with you.

    We are blessed to kick off our series with Fr. Stephen Freeman - an outstanding Orthodox priest, writer, blogger, speaker, and educator - who will present "The Mystery of the Sabbath - Keeping it Holy" on Tuesday March 23rd from 7-8:30PM. One of the aims of Fr. Stephen's talk will be to equip us with practical tools on how to cultivate a love within our parishes for The Lord's Day and the worship life of the Orthodox Church.

    Please pass this information along to interested friends and relatives.  As a Zoom platform, the event is open to all who desire to grow in their faith; we recommend it be considered INDISPENSABLE for all priests and religious educators.

    Registration here:tinyurl.com/KeepingItHoly
    Questions/more info: GOMoPRelEd@gmail.com
  • The Wednesday discussion group is exploring an interesting topic, about dealing with the times we live in. If you would like to join the discussion group, please contact Tony Bartl, who is leading the topic. (You can also leave a message through the Contact page on the church website, OrthodoxSanAngelo.org.) We are reading and discussing Rod Dreher's recent book, Live Not by Lies: a Manual for Christian Dissidents. Everyone is welcome to participate, including non-Orthodox, so invite your friends. Both online and in-person options are available. 

  • Read Ahead: This year's Lenten theme will revolve around the 6 Commands of Jesus found in Matthew 25: 31-46. Take a look at Matthew chapter 25, and see if you can spot them.

  • We need more chanters and readers. If you are interested in chanting or reading for the Church — or in learning how — please see Fr. Mark.

  • Calling all bakers! We need more people to bake prosforo, which is the fresh altar bread. Taking time to knead and bake it while praying is a special act that you can do for God, a gift you can make for Him. The ingredients are simple and inexpensive. Please contact Fr. Mark if you'd like to get the recipe or learn how to make it. Also, if you need a seal, Fr. Mark has one to loan to a prospective baker until they can purchase their own.

  • Send your prayer requests to Fr. Mark.

  • Reminder: Whenever we cannot attend church services, we should still find a way to worship God. You can pray these Morning Prayers during that time. The morning prayers are also good way to start every day. Here are some Evening Prayers for you too. "A day hemmed in prayer rarely comes unravelled." 

** As always, see the parish website for any changes and updates. **

 

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Gospel and Epistle Readings

Matins Gospel Reading

Sixth Orthros Gospel
The Reading is from Luke 24:36-53

At that time, Jesus, having risen from the dead, stood in the midst of his disciples and said to them, "Peace to you." But they were startled and frightened, and supposed that they saw a spirit. And he said to them, "Why are you troubled, and why do questionings rise in your hearts? See my hands and feet, that it is I myself; handle me, and see; for a spirit has not flesh and bones as you see that I have." And when he said this, he showed them his hands and his feet. And while they still disbelieved for joy, and wondered, he said to them, "Have you anything here to eat?" They gave him a piece of broiled fish, and he took it and ate before them.

Then he said to them, "These are my words which I spoke to you, while I was still with you, that everything written about me in the law of Moses and the prophets and the psalms must be fulfilled. Then he opened their minds to understand the scriptures, and said to them, "Thus it is written, that the Christ should suffer and on the third day rise from the dead, and that repentance and forgiveness of sins should be preached in his name to all nations, beginning from Jerusalem. You are witnesses of these things. And behold, I send the promise of my Father upon you; but stay in the city, until you are clothed with power from on high."

Then he led them out as far as Bethany, and lifting up his hands, he blessed them. While he blessed them, he parted from them, and was carried up into heaven. And they worshiped him, and they returned to Jerusalem with great joy, and were continually in the temple blessing God.


Epistle Reading

Judgment Sunday (Meatfare Sunday)
The Reading is from St. Paul's First Letter to the Corinthians 8:8-13; 9:1-2

Brethren, food will not commend us to God. We are no worse off if we do not eat, and no better off if we do. Only take care lest this liberty of yours somehow become a stumbling block to the weak. For if any one sees you, a man of knowledge, at table in an idol's temple, might he not be encouraged, if his conscience is weak, to eat food offered to idols? And so by your knowledge this weak man is destroyed, the brother for whom Christ died. Thus, sinning against your brethren and wounding their conscience when it is weak, you sin against Christ. Therefore, if food is a cause of my brother's falling, I will never eat meat, lest I cause my brother to fall.

Am I not free? Am I not an apostle? Have I not seen Jesus our Lord? Are not you my workmanship in the Lord? If to others I am not an apostle, at least I am to you; for you are the seal of my apostleship in the Lord.


Gospel Reading

Judgment Sunday (Meatfare Sunday)
The Reading is from Matthew 25:31-46

The Lord said, "When the Son of man comes in his glory and all the holy angels with him, then he will sit on his glorious throne. Before him will be gathered all the nations, and he will separate them one from another as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats, and he will place the sheep at his right hand, but the goats at the left. Then the king will say to those at his right hand, 'Come, O blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world; for I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me, I was naked and you clothed me, I was sick and you visited me, I was in prison and you came to me.' Then the righteous will answer him, 'Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you drink? And when did we see you a stranger and welcome you, or naked and clothe you? And when did we see you sick or in prison and visit you?' And the King will answer them, 'Truly, I say to you, as you did it to one of the least of these my brethren, you did it to me.' Then he will say to those at his left hand, 'Depart from me, you cursed, into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels; for I was hungry and you gave me no food, I was thirsty and you gave me no drink, I was a stranger and you did not welcome me, naked and you did not clothe me, sick and in prison and you did not visit me.' Then they also will answer, 'Lord, when did we see you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or naked or sick or in prison, and did not minister to you?' Then he will answer them, 'Truly, I say to you, as you did it not to one of the least of these, you did it not to me.' And they will go away into eternal punishment, but the righteous into eternal life."


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Hymns of the Day

Resurrectional Apolytikion in the 6th Tone

The angelic powers appeared at your tomb, the soldiers guarding it became as dead men, and Mary stood at your grave seeking, seeking your most pure body. But you made hell a captive; you were untouched by its might. You came to the virgin and granted life. O Lord, who rose from the dead, glory to you.

Apolytikion Hymn of Our Parish: for the Dormition of the Theotokos, in the 1st Tone

In giving birth you remained a virgin.  
And in your dormition, you did not forsake the world, 
O Theotokos.  
For as the Mother of Life, you have yourself passed into life.  
And by your prayers, you deliver our souls from death.

Seasonal Kontakion in the 1st Tone

When you come to the earth, O God, in your glory, all creation will tremble, and a river of fire will flow before your throne of judgment. The books will be opened and the secrets of all will be revealed. On that day, O just Judge, deliver me from eternal flames and make me worthy to stand at your right.
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Saints and Feasts

Lastjudgement1
March 07

Judgment Sunday (Meatfare Sunday)

The foregoing two parables -- especially that of the Prodigal Son -- have presented to us God's extreme goodness and love for man. But lest certain persons, putting their confidence in this alone, live carelessly, squandering upon sin the time given them to work out their salvation, and death suddenly snatch them away, the most divine Fathers have appointed this day's feast commemorating Christ's impartial Second Coming, through which we bring to mind that God is not only the Friend of man, but also the most righteous Judge, Who recompenses to each according to his deeds.

It is the aim of the holy Fathers, through bringing to mind that fearful day, to rouse us from the slumber of carelessness unto the work of virtue, and to move us to love and compassion for our brethren. Besides this, even as on the coming Sunday of Cheese-fare we commemorate Adam's exile from the Paradise of delight -- which exile is the beginning of life as we know it now -- it is clear that today's is reckoned the last of all feasts, because on the last day of judgment, truly, everything of this world will come to an end.

All foods, except meat and meat products, are allowed during the week that follows this Sunday.


Lavrentiossalamis
March 07

Lavrentios of Megara, the Righteous


Allsaint
March 07

Paul the Simple


Allsaint
March 07

The Holy Martyred Bishops of Cherson: Basileus, Ephraim, Eugene, Capito, Aetherius, Agathodorus, and Elpidius

These holy Bishops were sent to Cherson on the Black Sea by Hermon, Bishop of Jerusalem, in the days of Diocletian, about the year 300, to preach the Gospel. Ephraim and Basileus were sent first. Basileus raised to life the dead son of a local ruler, because of which many were baptized. Those who remained in their unbelief, however, dragged him through the streets until he died. Ephraim, refusing to offer sacrifice to idols, was beheaded. After them, Euguene, Agathodorus, Capito, and Elpitius were sent by the Bishop of Jerusalem as heralds of the Faith, but they also were slain by the ungodly. Last of all, the Bishop of Jerusalem sent Aetherius; he was drowned during the reign of Saint Constantine the Great.


Allsaint
March 08

Cheesefare Monday


Allsaint
March 08

Dometios the Righteous


Allsaint
March 08

Felix of Burgundy, Enlightener of East Anglia


Allsaint
March 08

Paul the Confessor


Allsaint
March 08

Theophylact the Confessor, Bishop of Nicomedia

Theophylact was from the East; his native city is unknown. In Constantinople he became a close friend of Tarsius, who afterwards became Patriarch of Constantinople (see Feb. 25).Theophylact was made Bishop of Nicomedia. After the death of Saint Tarsius, his successor Nicephorus (see June 2) called together a number of Bishops to help him in fighting the iconoclasm of Emperor Leo the Armenian, who reigned from 813-820. Among them was Euthymius, Bishop of Sardis (celebrated Dec. 26), who had attended the holy Seventh Ecumenical Council in 787 - he was exiled three times for the sake of the holy icons, and for defying the Emperor Theophilus' command to renounce the veneration of the icons, was scourged from head to foot until his whole body was one great wound, from which he died eight days later, about the year 830; Joseph of Thessalonica (see July 14); Michael of Synnada (see May 23); Emilian, Bishop of Cyzicus (see Aug. 8); and Saint Theophylact, who boldly rebuked Leo to his face, telling him that because he despised the long-suffering of God, utter destruction was about to overtake him, and there would be none to deliver him. For this, Theophylact was exiled to the fortress of Strobilus in Karia of Asia Minor, where, after 30 years of imprisonment and hardship, he gave up his holy soul about the year 845. Leo the Armenian, according to the Saint's prophecy, was slain in church on the eve of our Lord's Nativity, in 820.


Allsaint
March 08

Hermas the Apostle of the 70


40martsb
March 09

The Holy Forty Martyrs of Sebastia

These holy Martyrs, who came from various lands, were all soldiers under the same general. Taken into custody for their faith in Christ, and at first interrogated by cruel means, they were then stripped of their clothing and cast onto the frozen lake which is at Sebastia of Pontus, at a time when the harsh and freezing weather was at its worst. They endured the whole night naked in such circumstances, encouraging one another to be patient until the end. He that guarded them, named Aglaius, who was commanded to receive any of them that might deny Christ, had a vision in which he saw heavenly powers distributing crowns to all of the Martyrs, except one, who soon after abandoned the contest. Seeing this, Aglaius professed himself a Christian and joined the Martyrs on the lake, and the number of forty remained complete. In the morning, when they were almost dead from the cold, they were cast into fire, after which their remains were thrown into the river. Thus they finished the good course of martyrdom in 320, during the reign of Licinius. These are their names: Acacius, Aetius, Aglaius, Alexander, Angus, Athanasius, Candidus, Chudion, Claudius, Cyril, Cyrion, Dometian, Domnus, Ecdicius, Elias, Eunoicus, Eutyches, Eutychius, Flavius, Gaius, Gorgonius, Helianus, Heraclius, Hesychius, John, Lysimachus, Meliton, Nicholas, Philoctemon, Priscus, Sacerdon, Severian, Sisinius, Smaragdus, Theodulus, Theophilus, Valens, Valerius, Vivianus, and Xanthias.


Allsaint
March 10

Quadratus the Martyr & his Companions

These Martyrs contested for piety's sake in Corinth during the reign of the Emperor Valerian (253-260).


Allsaint
March 11

Sophronius, Patriarch of Jerusalem

This Saint was born in Damascus. As a young man he became a monk at the Monastery of Saint Theodosius the Cenobiarch in Palestine, where he met John Moschus and became his close friend. Having a common desire to search out ascetics from whom they could receive further spiritual instruction, they journeyed together through Palestine, Syria, Asia Minor, and Egypt, where they met the Patriarch of Alexandria, Saint John the Almsgiver, with whom they remained until 614, when Persians captured Jerusalem (see also Saint Anastasius the Persian, Jan. 22). Saint Sophronius and John Moschus departed Alexandria for Rome, where they remained until 619, the year of John Moschus' death. Saint Sophronius returned to the Monastery of Saint Theodosius the Cenobiarch, and there buried the body of his friend. He laboured much in defence of the Holy Fourth Council of Chalcedon, and traveled to Constantinople to remonstrate with Patriarch Sergius and the Emperor Heraclius for changing the Orthodox Faith with their Monothelite teachings. After the death of Patriarch Modestus in December of 634, Sophronius was elected Patriarch of Jerusalem. Although no longer in the hands of the Persians, the Holy Land was now besieged by the armies of the newly-appeared religion of Mohammed, which had already taken Bethlehem; in the Saint's sermon for the Nativity of our Lord in 634, he laments that he could not celebrate the feast in Bethlehem. In 637, for the sins of the people, to the uttermost grief of Saint Sophronius, the Caliph Omar captured Jerusalem. Having tended the flock of his Master for three years and three months, Saint Sophronius departed in peace unto Him Whom he loved on March 11, 638.

Saint Sophronius has left to the Church many writings, including the life of Saint Mary of Egypt. The hymn "O Joyous Light," which is wrongly ascribed to him, is more ancient than Saint Basil the Great, as the Saint himself confirms in his work "On the Holy Spirit" (ch. 29). However, it seems that this hymn, which was chanted at the lighting of the lamps and was formerly called "The Triadic Hymn," was later supplemented somewhat by Saint Sophronius, bringing it into the form in which we now have it. Hence, some have ascribed it to him.


Allsaint
March 12

Theophanes the Confessor

Saint Theophanes, who was born in 760, was the son of illustrious parents. Assenting to their demand, he married and became a member of the Emperor's ceremonial bodyguard. Later, with the consent of his wife, he forsook the world. Indeed, both of them embraced the monastic life, struggling in the monastic houses they themselves had established. He died on March 12, 815, on the island of Samothrace, whereto, because of his confession of the Orthodox Faith, he had been exiled by Leo the Armenian, the Iconoclast Emperor.


Symeonnewspious
March 12

Symeon the New Theologian

Saint Symeon became a monk of the Studite Monastery as a young man, under the guidance of the elder Symeon the Pious. Afterwards he struggled at the Monastery of Saint Mamas in Constantinople, of which he became abbot. After enduring many trials and afflictions in his life of piety, he reposed in 1022. Marvelling at the heights of prayer and holiness to which he attained, and the loftiness of the teachings of his life and writings, the church calls him "the New Theologian." Only to two others, John the Evangelist and Gregory, Patriarch of Constantinople, has the church given the name "Theologian." Saint Symeon reposed on March 12, but since this always falls in the Great Fast, his feast is kept today.


Allsaint
March 12

Gregory Dialogos, Bishop of Rome

Saint Gregory was born in Rome to noble and wealthy parents about the year 540. While the Saint was still young, his father died. However, his mother, Sylvia, saw to it that her child received a good education in both secular and spiritual learning. He became Prefect of Rome and sought to please God even while in the world; later, he took up the monastic life; afterwards he was appointed Archdeacon of Rome, then, in 579, apocrisiarius (representative or Papal legate) to Constantinople, where he lived for nearly seven years. He returned to Rome in 585 and was elected Pope in 590. He is renowned especially for his writings and great almsgiving, and also because, on his initiative, missionary work began among the Anglo-Saxon people. It is also from him that Gregorian Chant takes its name; the chanting he had heard at Constantinople had deeply impressed him, and he imported many elements of it into the ecclesiastical chant of Rome. He served as Bishop of that city from 590 to 604.


Allsaint
March 13

Removal of the relics of Nicephorus, Patriarch of Constantinople

The main feast day of this Saint is June 2. The translation of his holy relics took place in 846, when Saint Methodius (see June 14) was Ecumenical Patriarch.


Eden
March 14

Forgiveness Sunday

The Holy Fathers have appointed the commemoration of Adam's exile from the Paradise of delight here, on the eve of the holy Forty-day Fast, demonstrating to us not by simple words, but by actual deeds, how beneficial fasting is for man, and how harmful and destructive are insatiety and the transgressing of the divine commandments. For the first commandment that God gave to man was that of fasting, which the first-fashioned received but did not keep; and not only did they not become gods, as they had imagined, but they lost even that blessed life which they had, and they fell into corruption and death, and transmitted these and innumerable other evils to all of mankind. The God-bearing Fathers set these things before us today, that by bringing to mind what we have fallen from, and what we have suffered because of the insatiety and disobedience of the first-fashioned, we might be diligent to return again to that ancient bliss and glory by means of fasting and obedience to all the divine commands. Taking occasion from today's Gospel (Matt. 6:14-21) to begin the Fast unencumbered by enmity, we also ask forgiveness this day, first from God, then from one another and all creation.


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Wisdom of the Fathers

He indicates the dispositions of each, calling the one kids, the other sheep, that He might indicate the unfruitfulness of the one, for no fruit will come from kids; and the great profit from the other, for indeed from sheep great is the profit, as well from the milk, as from the wool, and from the young, of all which things the kid is destitute.
St. John Chrysostom
Homily on Matt. XXV, 4th Century

For when one has pity on the poor, he lends to God; and he who gives to the least gives to God--sacrifices spiritually to God an odour of a sweet smell.
St. Cyprian of Carthage
The Lord's Prayer, 33. B#41, p.102, 3rd century

"Christian love is the 'possible impossibility' to see Christ in another man, whoever he is..."
Alexander Schmemann
Great Lent, 20th Century

So great was the honour and providential care which God bestowed upon man that He brought the entire sensible world into being before him and for his sake. The kingdom of heaven was prepared for him from the foundation of the world (cf. Matt. 25:34); God first took counsel concerning him, and then he was fashioned by God's hand and according to the image of God (cf. Gen. 1:26-27). God did not form the whole man from matter and from the elements of this sensible world, as He did the other animals. He formed only man's body from these materials; but man's soul He took from things supercelestial or, rather, it came from God Himself when mysteriously He breathed life into man (cf. Gen. 2:7).
St. Gregory Palamas
Topics of Natural and Theological Science no. 24, The Philokalia Vol. 4 edited by Palmer, Sherrard and Ware; Faber and Faber pg. 356, 14th century

For though they had done ten thousand things, the munificence were of grace, that in return for services so small and cheap, such a heaven, and a kingdom, and so great honor, should be given them.
St. John Chrysostom
Homily 79 on Matthew 25, 2. B#54, p. 476., 4th Century

. . .The day will come when we shall stand before God and be judged, but as long as our pilgrimage continues, as long as we live in the process of becoming, as long as there is ahead of us this road that leads to the full measure of the stature of Christ which is our vocation, judgment must be pronounced by ourselves.
Metropolitan Anthony of Sourozh

For surely, as I have said, the sick and he that is in bonds seeks not for this only, but the one to be loosed, the other to be delivered from his infirmity. But He, being gracious, requires only what is within our power, or rather even less than what is within our power, leaving to us to exert our generosity in doing more.
St. John Chrysostom
Homily 79 on Matthew 25, 2. B#54, p. 476., 4th Century

And in return for what do they receive such things? For the covering of a roof, for a garment, for bread, for cold water, for visiting, for going into the prison. For indeed in every case it is for what is needed; and sometimes not even for that.
St. John Chrysostom
Homily 79 on Matthew 25, 2. B#54, p. 476., 4th Century

But while the brutes have from nature their unfruitfulness, and fruitfulness, these have it from choice, wherefore some are punished, and the others crowned. And He doth not punish them, until He hath pleaded with them; wherefore also, when He hath put them in their place, He mentions the charges against them.
St. John Chrysostom
Homily on Matt. XXV, 4th Century

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