Publish-header
Assumption of the Virgin Mary Orthodox Church
Publish Date: 2024-05-05
Bulletin Contents
Anastasi
Organization Icon
Assumption of the Virgin Mary Orthodox Church

General Information

  • Street Address:

  • 801 Montecito Drive

  • San Angelo, TX 76903


Contact Information




Services Schedule

Alternating Sundays:

9 AM Orthros Prayer Service & 
10 AM Divine Liturgy Communion Service

10 AM Typica Service

The 10 AM Sunday services are followed by Coffee Hour and Fellowship.


Past Bulletins


Calendar & Announcements

UPCOMING  SERVICES    

Saturday, May 4 - Holy Saturday

  • 10:00 am - Vesperal Liturgy of St. Basil 

  • 11:15 pm - Orthros of Holy Pascha - Resurrection Service

Sunday, May 5 - Great and Holy Pascha

  • 12:00 midnight  - Anastasis Service and Divine Liturgy 

Blessing of Eggs and Baskets Will Follow The Divine Liturgy 

  • 12:00 noon  - Agape Vespers

Potluck Will Follow The Service

Sunday, May 12 - Sunday of Thomas

  • 10:00 am -  Reader's Service

Saturday, May 18

  • 6:00 pm - Great Vespers

Sunday, May 19 - Sunday of the Myrrhbearing Women

  • 9:00 am - Orthros 

  • 10:00 am - Divine Liturgy

Sunday, May 26 - Sunday of the Paralytic

  • 10:00 am - Reader's Service

~

GREAT  LENT 

Beloved Brothers and Sisters in Christ,

As we prepare to enter the journey of Great Lent, we also prepare our bodies to fast, both physically and spiritually. Linked is an article for reflection and guidance on fasting, and below is pastoral guidance as we use this time of repentance, reflection and renewal to deepen our communion with God. 

For the Lenten Fast, please note the following guidelines: 

-Fasting should never jeopardize your health. If you are required to eat or abstain from certain foods as a medical/health necessity, please do what is necessary. Please speak with Fr. Nektarios if you need spiritual guidance for observing the Fast.

-Fasting is spiritual. It is about avoiding excess and time spent preparing food in order to commit time to prayer and contemplation.

-Fasting is giving our bodies the nutrition and sustenance needed, but lessening our focus on the desires of our physical body and seeking to commune more with God.

-Fasting is also diminishing the external influences of our fallen world and connecting more with the kingdom of God through prayer, worship, and spiritual reading.

-Fasting in personal. It is between you and God with the help of your spiritual father as needed. The goal is not to be perfect in fasting. The goal is to be nearer to the One who makes us holy because He is holy.

Great Lent begins on Monday, March 18.

-On the weekdays during Great Lent, fast from meat, fish, dairy, oil, and wine.

-Fish, oil and wine are permitted on the Feast of the Annunciation (March 25) and on Palm Sunday (April 28)

-Oil and wine are allowed on Saturdays and Sundays during Great Lent with the exception of Holy Saturday.

-Oil and wine are allowed on the following Commemorations during Great Lent:

 -Synaxis of the Archangel Gabriel – March 26

 -St. Andrew of Crete – April 18

 -The Lenten Fast ends on Great and Holy Pascha, May 5, and there is no fasting from May 5 through May 12 in observance of Bright Week.

-Oil and Wine are permitted on Wednesdays and Fridays following Bright Week to Pentecost (June 23), with fish also permitted on the Feast of Mid-Pentecost (May 29) and the Leavetaking of Pascha (June 12)

~

STEWARDSHIP 

This is a prayerful encouragement to support our parish with a donation. 

You can give as your regular stewardship or as a special donation either at church in the offering or online through our website at https://orthodoxsanangelo.org/about/ways-to-give 

God continues to bless our Assumption Church and the witness of our Orthodox Christian faith, and your regular stewardship and special gifts help to support the growth of our Church and our fulfilling of the Great Commission through our worship and ministry.

~

NEW  PARISH  EMAIL 

Our new parish email is priest@orthodoxsanangelo.org

Please use this to communicate with Fr. Nektarios. 

If you have not visited our new website, please do so at http://orthodoxsanangelo.org  

 

RESOURCES  FOR  INQUIRERS 

If you are inquiring about the Orthodox Christian faith, please reach out to Fr. Nektarios for resources.Our faith is focused on our worship and participation in the Church, the Body of Christ, and in cultivating our communion with God. 

We can provide you with a prayer book to guide you in daily prayers, as well as a book and online resources that explain the Orthodox Christian faith and life.

Fr. Nektarios is also available to meet with you by phone, Zoom or in person to offer guidance as you follow God's guidance and seek your spiritual home in the Orthodox Church.

~

ONLINE  CATECHISM  CLASS   

There will be no catechism class on April 25.  The next class will be on May 9.

Our focus between now and Holy Pascha (Easter) will be the book The Orthodox Faith, Worship, and LifeMost should have a copy of this book, as we used this same text in 2021, and it has been distributed to many of our catechumens and inquirers.  If you do not have a copy, please let Father Nektarios know. 

This book is very rich and substantive in its focus on the basic beliefs and practices of our faith. It is also a book that emphasizes worship and prayer as essential to living and learning our faith.  

Our weekly sessions will be on Zoom at the link below.  They will also be available livestream on our Assumption Facebook page, as well as on the YouTube Channel for St. Stephen Mission at https://www.youtube.com/@st.stephenorthodoxmission8116/streams

The sessions will also be archived at the same YouTube link in case you miss a session or would like to go back and listen to a specific week or topic. 

 
Meeting ID: 873 8452 7698

~

CARING  MEALS  MINISTRY 

If you know someone who needs meals due to illness, birth, etc., please see Kathy Baughman or Noelle Bartl. Thank you to everyone who volunteers for this ministry. You are being the hands of Christ!

~

HELP  FOR  THE  GARCIA  FAMILY

Joanna Garcia continues to go through a very difficult time with her ongoing illness. If you want to give a financial donation to help with medical expenses, etc., please make your check out to our church (Assumption of the Virgin Mary Greek Orthodox Church, or AVMGOC for short), and make note that it's for the Garcias.
 
If you have any questions, please call or text Kathy at 325-277-0274.
~

COFFEE  HOUR

We have open slots on the sign up sheet for Coffee Hour, which can be found on the refrigerator in the church kitchen. Can you help host? It's okay to bring something simple, or even just one dish. Encourage others to sign up with you as co-hosts. "Many hands make the burden light." Thank you for your help!

~

SPECIAL  OCCASIONS  FROM  MAY  4  TO  MAY  11  

Birthdays: Costa Dunias, Bill Jernigan, George Kalaitzes

Anniversaries: Marietta & David Garza (JOTP church)

Namedays: 

  • 5/9 - Noelle Bartl (St. Christopher)

Memorials: none

~

Check out the rest of the bulletin! See below for news from the world of Orthodoxy, online concerts and lecture series, and more.

~

AFTER  CHURCH

Please join us for refreshments in the Social Hall.

 

** As always, see the parish website for any changes and updates. **

 

 

 

 

BACK TO TOP

Gospel and Epistle Readings

Matins Gospel Reading

Great and Holy Pascha
The Reading is from Mark 16:1-8

When the Sabbath was past, Mary Magdalene, and Mary the mother of James and Salome, bought spices, so that they might go and anoint Jesus. And very early on the first day of the week they went to the tomb when the sun had risen. And they were saying to one another, "Who will roll away the stone for us from the door of the tomb?" And looking up, they saw that the stone was rolled back - it was very large. And entering the tomb, they saw a young man sitting on the right side, dressed in a white robe; and they were amazed. And he said to them, "Do not be amazed; you seek Jesus of Nazareth, who was crucified. He has risen, He is not here; see the place where they laid Him. But go, tell His disciples and Peter that He is going before you to Galilee; there you will see Him, as He told you." And they went out and fled from the tomb, for trembling and astonishment had come upon them; and they said nothing to anyone, for they were afraid.


Epistle Reading

Prokeimenon. 8th Tone. Psalm 117.24,29.
This is the day which the LORD has made; let us rejoice and be glad in it.
Verse: Give thanks to the LORD, for he is good; for his mercy endures for ever.

The reading is from Acts of the Apostles 1:1-8.

In the first book, O Theophilos, I have dealt with all that Jesus began to do and teach, until the day when he was taken up, after he had given commandment through the Holy Spirit to the apostles whom he had chosen. To them he presented himself alive after his passion by many proofs, appearing to them during forty days, and speaking of the kingdom of God. And while staying with them he charged them not to depart from Jerusalem, but to wait for the promise of the Father, which, he said, "you heard from me, for John baptized with water, but before many days you shall be baptized with the Holy Spirit."

So when they had come together, they asked him, "Lord, will you at this time restore the kingdom of lsrael?" He said to them, "it is not for you to know times or seasons which the Father has fixed by his own authority. But you shall receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you; and you shall be my witnesses in Jerusalem and in all Judea and Samaria and to the end of the earth."


Gospel Reading

Great and Holy Pascha
The Reading is from John 1:1-17

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God; all things were made through him, and without him was not anything made that was made. In him was life, and the life was the light of men. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it.

There was a man sent from God, whose name was John. He came for testimony, to bear witness to the light, that all might believe through him. He was not the light, but came to bear witness to the light.

The true light that enlightens every man was coming into the world. He was in the world, and the world was made through him, yet the world knew him not. He came to his own home, and his own people received him not. But to all who received him, who believed in his name, he gave power to become children of God; who were born, not of blood nor of the will of the flesh nor of the will of man, but of God.

And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, full of grace and truth; we have beheld his glory, glory as of the only Son from the Father. (John bore witness to him, and cried, "This was he of whom I said, 'He who comes after me ranks before me, for he was before me.'") And from his fullness have we all received, grace upon grace. For the law was given through Moses; grace and truth came through Jesus Christ.


BACK TO TOP

Hymns of the Day

Apolytikion for Great and Holy Pascha in the 5th Tone

Christ is risen from the dead, trampling down death by death, and on those in the grave bestowing life.

Hypakoe of Great and Holy Pascha in the 4th Tone

When they who were with Mary came, anticipating the dawn, and found the stone rolled away from the sepulchre, they heard from the Angel: Why seek ye among the dead, as though He were mortal man, Him Who abideth in everlasting light? Behold the grave-clothes. Go quickly and proclaim to the world that the Lord is risen, and hath put death to death. For He is the Son of God, Who saveth the race of men.

Seasonal Kontakion in the 8th Tone

Into the grave you descended, Immortal One, yet you destroyed the power of Hades, and as victor you arose, O Christ our God; you proclaimed to the myrrhbearing women a greeting of joy, you brought peace to your holy apostles, and to the fallen you granted resurrection.
BACK TO TOP

Saints and Feasts

Anastasi
May 05

Great and Holy Pascha

Mary Magdalene, and the other women who were present at the burial of our Saviour on Friday evening, returned from Golgotha to the city and prepared fragrant spices and myrrh, so that they might anoint the body of Jesus. On the morrow, because of the law which forbids work on the day of the Sabbath, they rested for the whole day. But at early dawn on the Sunday that followed, almost thirty-six hours since the death of the Life-giving Redeemer, they came to the sepulchre with the spices to anoint His body. While they were considering the difficulty of rolling away the stone from the door of the sepulchre, there was a fearful earthquake; and an Angel, whose countenance shone like lightning and whose garment was white as snow, rolled away the stone and sat upon it. The guards that were there became as dead from fear and took to flight. The women, however, went into the sepulchre, but did not find the Lord's body. Instead, they saw two other Angels in the form of youths clothed in white, who told them that the Saviour was risen, and they sent forth the women, who ran to proclaim to the disciples these gladsome tidings. Then Peter and John arrived, having learned from Mary Magdalene what had come to pass, and when they entered the tomb, they found only the winding sheets. Therefore, they returned again to the city with joy, as heralds now of the supernatural Resurrection of Christ, Who in truth was seen alive by the disciples on this day on five occasions.

Our Lord, then, was crucified, died, and was buried on Friday, before the setting of the sun, which was the first of His "three days" in the grave; observing the mystical Sabbath, that "seventh day" in which it is said that the Lord "rested from all His works" (Gen. 2:2-3), He passed all of Saturday in the grave; and He arose "while it was yet dark, very early in the morning" on Sunday, the third day, which, according to the Hebrew reckoning, began after sunset on Saturday.

As we celebrate today this joyous Resurrection, we greet and embrace one another in Christ, thereby demonstrating our Saviour's victory over death and corruption, and the destruction of our ancient enmity with God, and His reconciliation toward us, and our inheritance of life everlasting. The feast itself is called Pascha, which is derived from the Hebrew word which means "passover"; because Christ, Who suffered and arose, has made us to pass over from the curse of Adam and slavery to the devil and death unto our primal freedom and blessedness. In addition, this day of this particular week, which is the first of all the rest, is dedicated to the honour of the Lord; in honour and remembrance of the Resurrection, the Apostles transferred to this day the rest from labour that was formerly assigned to the Sabbath of the ancient Law.

All foods allowed during Renewal Week.


05_irene
May 05

Irene the Great Martyr

Saint Irene was the daughter of a princelet called Licinius; named Penelope by her parents, through a divine revelation she was brought to faith in Christ and at Baptism was renamed Irene. In her zeal for piety she broke in pieces all the idols of her father, who commanded that she be trampled underfoot by horses. But while she remained unharmed, one of the horses rose up and cast down her father, killing him. By her prayer she raised him to life again, and he believed and was baptized. Afterwards, in many journeyings, Saint Irene suffered torments and punishments for her faith, but was preserved by the power of God, while working dread miracles and converting many thousands of souls. At last she came to Ephesus, where she fell asleep in peace, in the first half of the fourth century. Two days after her death, her gravestone was found lifted off, and her grave empty. At least two churches were dedicated to Saint Irene in Constantinople, and she is also the patroness of the Aegean island of Thera, which is commonly called Santorin (or Santorini), a corruption of "Saint Irene."


Allsaint
May 05

Neophytos, Gaius, & Caianus the Monk-martyrs


Allsaint
May 05

The Righteous Martyr Ephraim the Younger


01_anastasis3
May 06

Renewal Monday


23_george4
April 23

George the Great Martyr and Triumphant

George, this truly great and glorious Martyr of Christ, was born of a father from Cappadocia and a mother from Palestine. Being a military tribune, or chiliarch (that is, a commander of a thousand troops), he was illustrious in battle and highly honoured for his courage. When he learned that the Emperor Diocletian was preparing a persecution of the Christians, Saint George presented himself publicly before the Emperor and denounced him. When threats and promises could not move him from his steadfast confession, he was put to unheard-of tortures, which he endured with great bravery, overcoming them by his faith and love towards Christ. By the wondrous signs that took place in his contest, he guided many to the knowledge of the truth, including Queen Alexandra, wife of Diocletian, and was finally beheaded in 296 in Nicomedia.

His sacred remains were taken by his servant from Nicomedia to Palestine, to a town called Lydda, the homeland of his mother, and then were finally transferred to the church which was raised up in his name. (The translation of the Saint's holy relics to the church in Lydda is commemorated on November 3; Saint Alexandra the Queen, on April 21.)

If April 23 falls on or before Great and Holy Pascha, the Feast of St. George is translated to Bright Monday.


Allsaint
May 06

Job the Prophet

This faithful servant of God, the most perfect icon of all virtue, and especially of patience, was the son of Zare and Bosorra, and was the fifth from Abraham. He was true, blameless, just, devout, and abstained from every evil thing. He was very wealthy and blessed by God in all things, as was none other of the inhabitants of the land of Ausis, his homeland, which lies between Idumea and Arabia. But by divine permission, that he might be tried, he was suddenly deprived of his children, wealth, glory, and every consolation, and was covered with grievous sores over all his body. Some say that he endured courageously in this unparalleled calamity for seven whole years. Then, by divine blessing, he was restored again to a prosperity even more illustrious than the first. Having lived after his affliction for 170 years, he reposed full of days at the age of 240, in the year 1350 B.C. Others say that his affliction lasted only one year, and that he lived thereafter 140 years, living 210 years altogether.


Levadia
May 06

Our Holy Father Seraphim the Struggler of Mt. Domvu


Raphnicholasirene
May 07

Renewal Tuesday: The Commemoration of Saints Raphael, Nicholas, Irene, and the Other Newly-revealed Martyrs of Lesbos

On the island of Mytilene (Lesbos in ancient times), near the village of Therme, the villagers had a custom of ascending a certain hill on this day to celebrate the Divine Liturgy in the ruins of a small chapel, although no one knew whence the tradition sprang. In the year 1959, certain villagers began seeing persons who spoke to them, first in dreams, then awake, both by day and by night. Through these wondrous appearances, which were given to many people independently, the holy Martyrs Raphael, Archimandrite of the ancient monastery, and Nicholas, his deacon, together with other Saints who had been martyred on the island, told the villagers the whole account of their martyrdom, which had taken place at the hands of the Moslem Turks ten years after the fall of Constantinople, in 1463. The twelve-year-old Irene had been tortured, then burned alive in a large earthenware jar in the presence of her parents. On Tuesday of Renewal Week, Saint Raphael had been tied to a tree and his head sawn off through his jaws; Saint Nicholas had died at the sight of this. Although the feast is celebrated today because it is the day of their martyrdom, through the appearances of the Saints as living persons five hundred years after their martyrdom, it is also a singular testimony to the Resurrection of Christ.


Constantinegreat
May 07

Commemoration of the Precious Cross that appeared in the sky over Jerusalem in 351 A.D.

On this day in the year 351, not long after Cyril had succeeded Maximus as Archbishop of Jerusalem, during the reign of Constantius, the son of Saint Constantine the Great, on the day of Pentecost, the sign of the Cross appeared over Jerusalem. Saint Cyril, in his letter to the Emperor Constantius, says, "At about the third hour of the day, an enormous Cross, formed of light, appeared in the heaven above holy Golgotha and reaching to the holy Mount of Olives, being seen not by one or two only, but manifest with perfect clarity to the whole multitude of the city; not, as one might suppose, rushing swiftly past in fancy, but seen openly above the earth many hours in plain sight, and overcoming the beams of the sun with its dazzling rays" (PG 33:1 16q).


Athanasi
May 02

Removal of the Relics of St. Athanasios the Great

In the half-century after the First Ecumenical Council held in Nicaea in 325, if there was one man whom the Arians feared and hated more intensely than any other, as being able to lay bare the whole error of their teaching, and to marshal, even from exile or hiding, the beleaguered forces of the Orthodox, it was Saint Athanasius the Great. This blazing lamp of Orthodoxy, which imperial power and heretics' plots could not quench when he shone upon the lampstand, nor find when he was hid by the people and monks of Egypt, was born in Alexandria about the year 296. He received an excellent training in Greek letters and especially in the sacred Scriptures, of which he shows an exceptional knowledge in his writings. Even as a young man he had a remarkable depth of theological understanding; he was only about twenty years old when he wrote his treatise On the Incarnation. Saint Alexander, the Archbishop of Alexandria, brought him up in piety, ordained him his deacon, and, after deposing Arius for his blasphemy against the Divinity of the Son of God, took Athanasius to the First Council in Nicaea in 325; Saint Athanasius was to spend the remainder of his life labouring in defence of this holy Council. In 326, before his death, Alexander appointed Athanasius his successor.

In 325, Arius had been condemned by the Council of Nicaea; yet through Arius' hypocritical confession of Orthodox belief, Saint Constantine the Great was persuaded by Arius' supporters that he should be received back into the communion of the Church. But Athanasius, knowing well the perverseness of his mind, and the disease of heresy lurking in his heart, refused communion with Arius. The heresiarch's followers then began framing false charges against Athanasius; finally Saint Constantine the Great, misled by grave charges of the Saint's misconduct-which were completely false-had him exiled to Tiberius (Treves) in Gaul in 336. When Saint Constantine was succeeded by his three sons Constantine II, Constans, and Constantius, in 337, Saint Athanasius returned to Alexandria in triumph. But his enemies found an ally in Constantius, Emperor of the East; Saint Athanasius' second exile was spent in Rome. It was ended when Constans prevailed with threats upon his brother Constantius to restore Athanasius (see also Nov. 6). For ten years Saint Athanasius strengthened Orthodoxy throughout Egypt, visiting the whole country and encouraging all, clergy, monastics, and layfolk, being loved by all as a father. But after Constans' death in 350, Constantius became sole Emperor,and Athanasius was again in danger. In the evening of February 8, 356, General Syrianus with more than five thousand soldiers surrounded the church in which Athanasius was serving, and broke open the doors. Athanasius' clergy begged him to leave, but the good shepherd commanded that all the flock should withdraw first; and only when he was assured of their safety, he also, protected by divine grace, passed through the midst of the soldiers and disappeared into the deserts of Egypt, where for some six years he eluded the soldiers and spies sent after him.

When Julian the Apostate succeeded Constantius in 361, Athanasius returned again, but only for a few months. Because Athanasius had converted many pagans, and the priests of the idols in Egypt wrote to Julian that if Athanasius remained, idolatry would perish in Egypt, the heathen Emperor ordered not Athanasius' exile, but his death. Athanasius took ship up the Nile. When he learned that his imperial pursuers were following him, he had his men turn back, and as his boat passed that of his pursuers, they asked him if he had seen Athanasius. "He is not far," he answered. After returning to Alexandria for a while, he fled again to the Thebaid until Julian's death in 363. Saint Athanasius suffered his fifth and last exile under Valens in 365, which only lasted four months because Valens, fearing a sedition among the Egyptians for their beloved Archbishop, revoked his edict in February, 366.

The great Athanasius passed the remaining seven years of his life in peace. Of his fifty-seven years as Patriarch, he had spent some seventeen in exiles. Shining from the height of his throne like a radiant evening star, and enlightening the Orthodox with the brilliance of his words for yet a little while, this much-suffering champion inclined toward the sunset of his life, and, in the year 373, took his rest from his lengthy sufferings, but not before another luminary of the truth, Basil the Great, had risen in the East, being consecrated Archbishop of Caesarea in 370. Besides all his other achievements, Saint Athanasius wrote the life of Saint Anthony the Great, with whom he spent time in his youth; ordained Saint Frumentius first Bishop of Ethiopia; and in his Paschal Encyclical for the year 367 set forth the books of the Old and New Testaments accepted by the Church as canonical. Saint Gregory the Theologian, in his Oration On the Great Athanasius, said he was "Angelic in appearance, more angelic in mind; ... rebuking with the tenderness; of a father, praising with the dignity of a ruler ... Everything was harmonious, as an air upon a single lyre, and in the same key; his life, his teaching, his struggles, his dangers, his return, and his conduct after his return ... be treated so mildly and gently those who had injured him, that even they themselves, if I may say so, did not find his restoration distasteful."


08_stjohn1
May 08

Synaxis of John the Apostle, Evangelist, and Theologian

The feast today in honour of the holy Apostle John commemorates the miracle taking place each year in Ephesus, in which a certain dust or powder, called manna, suddenly poured forth from his tomb and was used by the faithful for deliverance from maladies of both soul and body. For an account of his life, see September 26.


Allsaint
May 07

Repose of St. Nilus, abbot of Sora


01_resurrection21
May 09

Renewal Thursday


Arseniosgreat
May 08

Arsenios the Great

Saint Arsenios was a deacon of the Church of Rome, born of an illustrious family, and wondrous in virtue. In the days of Saint Theodosius the Great, he was chosen to be the tutor of the Emperor's young sons, Arcadius and Honorius. While living at the imperial palace in Constantinople, compassed with all luxury and innumerable temptations to sin, Arsenios often besought God with tears to guide him to salvation. This prayer was answered one day when a voice came to him saying, "Arsenios, flee from men, and thou shalt be saved." He sailed secretly to Alexandria, and from there went to Scete, where he became a monk. Yet after he had withdrawn from the world, and was come among the most illustrious monks of his day, he heard, 'Arsenios, flee, be silent, pray always, for these are the causes of sinning not." Following this call, he separated himself even from his fellow monks, practicing extreme silence. On Saturday evenings, he would turn his back on the setting sun, and would stretch out his hands in prayer to Heaven, till the sun shone upon his face the following morning, and only then would he sit down. Once a monk came to visit him, and looking into his cell saw Arsenios entirely like a flame of fire. After living some fifty-five years as a monk, and attaining to heights reached by few, he reposed in peace about the year 449, at the age of ninety-five.


Isaiah
May 09

Isaiah the Prophet

The Prophet Esaias, the son of Amos, was descended from a royal tribe. He prophesied in the days of Ozias (who is also called Azarias), Joatham, Ahaz, and Hezekias, Kings of Judah. About 681 B.C, in the reign of Manasses, the son and successor of the most pious Hezekias, when this Prophet was censuring Manasses' impiety and lawlessness, he was sawn asunder with a wooden saw, and thus received a martyr's end.

Of all the Prophets, he is called the most eloquent because of the beauty and loftiness of his words. His book of prophecy, divided into sixty-six chapters, is ranked first among the greater Prophets. The Fifth Ode of the Psalter, "Out of the night my spirit waketh at dawn unto Thee, O God . . ." is taken from his book. It was this holy Prophet who foretold that a Virgin would conceive in the womb (7:14); that not an ambassador, nor an angel, but the Lord Himself would save fallen man (63:9); that the Messiah would suffer, bearing our sins (ch. 53). His name means "Yah is helper."


Christopher2
May 09

Christopher the Martyr of Lycea

Saint Christopher was at first named Reprobus. Seeing the Christians persecuted, he rebuked the tyrants for their cruelty. Soldiers were sent to bring him to appear before the ruler; but he converted them to Christ, and with them was baptized, receiving the name Christopher. After he appeared before the ruler, he was imprisoned and two harlots were sent to seduce him, but he converted them also, and encouraged them in their martyrdom. He was subjected to torments and finally beheaded in the days of Decius. Many marvellous and mythical things are said about him out of ignorance and superstition, one of which is that it is impossible for one to die suddenly from some unexpected cause on the day on which one looks at the Saint's icon. This is the origin of that proverb that is quoted in various quarters: "If on Christopher thou shouldst gaze, thou shalt safely wend life's ways." The etymology of his name, which means "Christ-bearer," has undoubtedly moved iconographers to depict him carrying the infant Jesus on his shoulders; it is completely erro-neous, however, to depict him, as some uninformed iconographers do, having the head of a dog, because of a statement in his life that he was dog-faced, by which is meant only that his countenance was exceedingly frightful to look upon.


Zoodochos
May 10

Renewal Friday: Theotokos of the Life-giving Spring

Outside of Constantinople, towards the district of the Seven Towers, there was in ancient times a very large and most beautiful church named in honour of the Theotokos; it had been built about the middle of the fifth century by the Emperor Leo the Great (also called "Leo of Thrace," he is commemorated on Jan. 20). Before he became Emperor, he had encountered there a blind man, who being tormented with thirst asked him to help him find water. Leo felt compassion for him and went in search of a source of water but found none. As he became downcast, he heard a voice telling him there was water nearby. He looked again, and found none. Then he heard the voice again, this time calling him "Emperor" and telling him that he would find muddy water in the densely wooded place nearby; he was to take some water and anoint the blind man's eyes with it. When he had done this, the blind man received his sight. After Leo became Emperor as the most holy Theotokos had prophesied, he raised up a church over the spring, whose waters worked many healings and cured maladies by the grace of the Theotokos; from this, it came to be called the "Life-giving Spring." The Church of Christ celebrates the consecration of this church on this day.

After the fall of the imperial city, this church was razed to the ground and the materials from it were used for building the mosque of Sultan Bayezid. Nothing remained of that church's ancient beauty, except for a small and paltry chapel, almost completely buried in the ruins. This chapel had twenty-five steps going down into it, and a transom window on the roof, wherefrom it received a little light. Toward the western side of the chapel was the aforementioned holy Spring, fenced about with a railing, and with fish swimming in it. Such was the condition of the Spring until 1821. Then even that little remnant was destroyed, occasioned by the uprising of the Greek nation against the Ottoman Empire; the sacred Spring was buried with it and disappeared altogether.

But in the days of Sultan Mahmud, when those subject to him were rejoicing in their freedom to practice their religion, permission was sought by the Orthodox Christian community to rebuild at least part of the chapel. Thus the work was begun on July 26, 1833. When the excavation had been made, and the foundations of the ancient church were found, there was rebuilt -- by a later writ of permission from the Sultan -- not merely a chapel of the holy Spring, but another new church, constructed upon the foundations of the ancient one. The building of this spacious, beautiful, and most majestic temple began on September 14, 1833, and the work was completed on December 30, 1834. On February 2, 1835, the Ecumenical Patriarch Constantine II, serving the Liturgy together with twelve hierarchs and a great company of clergy, as well as a boundless multitude of Christians, performed the consecration of this sacred church and dedicated it to the glory of the Mother of God. On September 6, 1955, however, it was desecrated and destroyed again by the Moslem Turks; it has been restored again, but not to the former magnificence.


Simonzealot
May 10

Simon the Zealot and Apostle

This Apostle was one of the Twelve, and was called Simon the Cananite by Matthew, but Simon the Zealot by Luke (Matt. 10:4; Luke 6:15). The word "Cananite" used by Matthew is believed to be derived from kana, which in the Palestinian dialect of Aramaic means "zealot" or 'zealous"; Luke therefore translates the meaning of "Cananite." Later accounts say that he was the bridegroom at the wedding in Cana of Galilee, where the Lord Jesus changed the water into wine, making this the first of His miracles (John 2:1-11); according to some, he is called Cananite because he was from Cana (according to others, from the Land of Canaan). Simon means "one who hears."


Allsaint
May 11

Renewal Saturday


Allsaint
May 11

Renewal of Constantinople


Allsaint
May 11

Mokios the Holy Martyr

The holy Hieromartyr Mocius, who was of Roman parents, lived during the reign of Diocletian, and was a priest in Amphipolis of Thrace. One day as the idolaters were assembled, and the Proconsul Laodicius was offering sacrifice to Dionysus, Mocius entered the temple and overturned the altar. After many torments, through which he was preserved whole by grace divine, he was sent to Byzantium, where he was beheaded about the year 288. Saint Constantine the Great built a magnificent church in honour of Saint Mocius in Constantinople, where his holy relics were enshrined. He is one of the Holy Unmercenaries.


Cyrilmethodios
May 11

Methodios & Cyril, Equal-to-the Apostles Illuminators of the Slavs

Born in Thessalonica, Saint Methodius was a military man before becoming a monk on Mount Olympus. His brother Constantine, known as the Philosopher because of his erudition, was Librarian at the Church of the Holy Wisdom in Constantinople; he later became a monk with the name of Cyril. The Emperor Michael sent him with his brother Methodius to the Khazars in response to their petition for teachers to expound to them the Christian Faith. On their way, they stayed in Cherson, where they recovered from the Black Sea the relics of Saint Clement of Rome. Later, they were called by Prince Rostislav of Moravia to instruct his people in the Orthodox Faith (Saint Rostislav died a martyr's death and is celebrated Oct. 15). The Saints devised an alphabet for the Slavs, and used it to translate the Greek books into the language of the people. In their apostolic labours throughout the Balkans, the holy brothers were slandered by certain Germanic bishops who opposed the use of the vernacular in the church services. Summoned to court at Rome in 867, they presented their Slavonic translations to Pope Adrian II, who received them with love and full approval. Two years later, Saint Cyril reposed in Rome on February 14 and was buried in the Church of Saint Clement. Saint Methodius was made Bishop of Moravia, but at the intrigues of certain Latin clergy, was cast into prison by the "Holy Roman Emperor" (the Germanic Emperor of the West), where he was cruelly tormented for some three years. In 874, through the defence of Pope John VIII, he was freed and made Archbishop of Moravia. Because he reproved the lax morals of the German priests in Moravia, he was soon accused of heresy by them, and was forbidden to celebrate the Liturgy in Slavonic. Summoned to Rome again in 879, he was completely exonerated and allowed once again to use the Slavonic tongue for the divine services. He reposed on April 6, 885.


Allsaint
May 12

Martyrs Emmanuel, Theodore, George, Michael and the other George of Samothrace


Epiphanius
May 12

Epiphanios, Bishop of Cyprus

Saint Epiphanius was born about 310 in Besanduc, a village of Palestine, of Jewish parents who were poor and tillers of the soil. In his youth he came to faith in Christ and was baptized with his sister, after which he distributed all he had to the poor and became a monk, being a younger contemporary of Saint Hilarion the Great (see Oct. 21), whom he knew. He also visited the renowned monks of Egypt to learn their ways. Because the fame of his virtue had spread, many in Egypt desired to make him a bishop; when he learned of this, he fled, returning to Palestine. But after a time he learned that the bishops there also intended to consecrate him to a widowed bishopric, and he fled to Cyprus. In Paphos he met Saint Hilarion, who told him to go to Constantia, a city of Cyprus also called Salamis. Epiphanius answered that he preferred to take ship for Gaza, which, despite Saint Hilarion's admonitions, he did. But a contrary wind brought the ship to Constantia where, by the providence of God, Epiphanius fell into the hands of bishops who had come together to elect a successor to the newly-departed Bishop of Constantia, and the venerable Epiphanius was at last constrained to be consecrated, about the year 367. He was fluent in Hebrew, Egyptian, Syriac, Greek, and Latin, and because of this he was called "Five-tongued." He had the gift of working miracles, and was held in such reverence by all, that although he was a known enemy of heresy, he was well nigh the only eminent bishop that the Arians did not dare to drive into exile when the Emperor Valens persecuted the Orthodox about the year 371. Having tended his flock in a manner pleasing to God, and guarded it undefiled from every heresy, he reposed about the year 403, having lived for ninety-three years. Among his sacred writings, the one that is held in special esteem is the Panarion (from the Latin Panarium, that is, "Bread-box,") containing the proofs of the truth of the Faith, and an examination of eighty heresies.


Allsaint
May 12

Germanos, Patriarch of Constantinople

Saint Germanos, who was from Constantinople, was born to an illustrious family, the son of Justinian the Patrician. First he became Metropolitan of Cyzicus; in 715 he was elevated to the throne of Constantinople; but because of his courageous resistance to Leo the Isaurian's impious decree which inaugurated the war upon the holy icons, he was exiled from his throne in 715. He lived the rest of his life in privacy, and reposed about 740, full of days. The fore-most of his writings is that which deals with the Six Ecumenical Councils. He wrote many hymns also, as is apparent from the titles of many stichera and idiomela, among which are those for the Feast of the Meeting in the Temple.


Theodorecythera
May 12

Theodorus the Righteous of Cythera


Thomsund
May 12

Thomas Sunday

Though the doors were shut at the dwelling where the disciples were gathered for fear of the Jews on the evening of the Sunday after the Passover, our Saviour wondrously entered and stood in their midst, and greeted them with His customary words, "Peace be unto you." Then He showed unto them His hands and feet and side; furthermore, in their presence, He took some fish and a honeycomb and ate before them, and thus assured them of His bodily Resurrection. But Thomas, who was not then present with the others, did not believe their testimony concerning Christ's Resurrection, but said in a decisive manner, "Except I shall see in His hands the print of the nails, and put my finger into the print of the nails, and thrust my hand into His side, I will not believe." Wherefore after eight days, that is, on this day, when the disciples were again gathered together and Thomas was with them, the Lord Jesus came while the doors were shut, as He did formerly. Standing in their midst, He said, "Peace be unto you"; then He said to Thomas, "Bring hither thy finger, and behold my hands; and bring hither thy hand, and thrust it into My side: and be not unbelieving, but believing."

And Thomas, beholding and examining carefully the hands and side of the Master, cried out with faith, "My Lord and my God." Thus he clearly proclaimed the two natures - human and divine - of the God-man (Luke 24:36-49; John 20:19-29).

This day is called Antipascha (meaning "in the stead of Pascha," not "in opposition to Pascha") because with this day, the first Sunday after Pascha, the Church consecrates every Sunday of the year to the commemoration of Pascha, that is, the Resurrection.


BACK TO TOP

Wisdom of the Fathers

...all knowledge, strength and virtue are the grace of God, as are all other things. And through grace He has given all men the power to become sons of God (cf. John 1:12) by keeping the divine commandments. Or, rather, these commandments keep us, and are the grace of God, since without His grace we cannot keep them. We have nothing to offer Him except our faith, our resolution and, in brief, all the true dogmas that we hold with firm faith through the teaching we have heard (cf. Rom. 10:17).
St. Peter of Damaskos
A Treasury of Divine Knowledge, Book 1: Introduction, Philokalia Vol. 3 edited by Palmer, Sherrard and Ware; Faber and Faber pg. 89, 8th century

...'the light' already 'shines in the darkness' (Jn. 1:5), both by day and by night, both within and without - within in our hearts (II Cor. 6:16), without in our minds. It shines on us without evening, without change, without alteration, without form. It speaks, works, lives, gives life, and changes into light those whom it illuminates. We bear witness that 'God is light' (I Jn. 1:5) and those to whom it has been granted to see Him have all beheld Him as light, because the light of His glory goes before Him, and it is impossible for Him to appear without light. Those who have not seen His light have not seen Him, for He is the Light, and those who have not received the Light have not yet received grace. Those who have received grace have received the Light of God and have received God, even as Christ Himself, who is the Light, has said, 'I will live in them and move among them' (II Cor. 6:16).
St. Symeon the New Theologian
Discourses: XXVIII sect. 4, Paulist Press pg. 298, 11th century

Now this is a proof that Christ is God the Word, and the Power of God. For whereas human things cease, and the Word of Christ abides, it is clear to all eyes that what ceases is temporary, but that He Who abides is God, and the true Son of God, His only-begotten Word.
St. Athanasius of Alexandria
On the Incarnation 55, 4th Century

He is also called Wisdom, as the Knowledge of things divine and human. For how is it possible that He Who made all things should be ignorant of the reasons of what He has made?
St. Gregory the Theologian
Fourth Theological Oration, 4th Century

We often hear from others, or sometimes read in the works of others, what God has placed in our mind and heart, what we ourselves have cherished - that is, we often meet our favourite thoughts in others, and it seems to us as though they had been taken away from us, as though they had been new ones and formed our own exclusive property. Presumptuous thoughts! What? Is there not only one God, the Lord of all intellects? Is not His Spirit in all who seek for truth? Have we not one sole enlightener, 'which lighteth every man that cometh into the world' (Jn 1:9). Glory to the one God, Glory to Him Who loves all and bountifully bestows upon all His spiritual and bodily gifts! Glory to Him who is no respecter of persons and Who reveals the mysteries of His love, omnipotence and wisdom unto babes (Lk. 10:21)!
St. John of Kronstadt
My Life in Christ, Part 1; Holy Trinity Monastery pg. 31, 19th century

We often receive through prayer that which we have asked for, especially when we pray for that which relates to the salvation of our soul; it is necessary to ascribe this directly to God and His grace, and not to chance. How can there possibly be any chance in the Kingdom of the Almighty God? Nothing can really happen without His will, as 'without Him was not anything made that hath been made' (John 1:3).
St. John of Kronstadt
My Life in Christ, Part 1; Holy Trinity Monastery pg. 12, 19th century

BACK TO TOP

Archdiocese News

Service of the Twelve Gospels at St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Shrine Church Flushing, NY

05/03/2024

On Holy Thursday in the Greek Orthodox Church we hear the emotion of the Twelve Gospels as we commemorate the death of Christ on the Cross. On this sacred and solemn day His Eminence Archbishop Elpidophoros of America visited St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Shrine Church in Flushing, NY. Presiding priest Paul Palesty, Assistant Priests Aristidis Garinis and Alexander Douvres, Archdeacon Dionysios and Deacon Jeremiah also participated in the service.


Archbishop Elpidophoros - Homily for the Service of the Twelve Gospels

05/03/2024

My Beloved Christians,

Tonight, our service overwhelms our hearts and astonishes our minds, as we contemplate the vision of God crucified in the flesh.

We stand in awe before the One Who suspended the land in the midst of the waters, and our planet in the midst of the stars, as He hangs upon the Cross for our redemption and eternal life.

We have listened to the eloquence of the Twelve Gospels, which contain the agonizing details of our Lord’s arrest, trial, and Crucifixion. And we have glorified His condescension, his Humility, and His long-suffering – His μακροθυμία on behalf of us all.


Archbishop Elpidophoros of America Served as a priest at Vesperal Divine Liturgy of Holy and Great Thursday in the Archdiocese Chapel of Saint Paul

05/02/2024

This morning, May 2, 2024, His Eminence Archbishop Elpidophoros of America served as a priest at Vesperal Divine Liturgy of Holy and Great Thursday in the Archdiocese Chapel of Saint Paul. Chancellor of the Archdiocesan District Fr. Elias Villis and Archdeacon Dionysios Papiris served in the Liturgy with His Eminence. The staff of the Archdiocese gathered for this annual service.


Archbishop Elpidophoros Homily for the Service Holy Unction Great and Holy Wednesday – May 1, 2024 Saints Catherine and George Greek Orthodox Church

05/02/2024

I have come to your wonderful parish, to serve this very special service of Holy Unction with you, the faithful. Tonight, we gather for the healing of body and soul, and for the forgiveness of our sins.[*]


MISSED US? THE DRE HOLY WEEK SERMON SERIES IS BACK FOR THE WEEK!

05/02/2024

From Sunday to Sunday, the Department of Religious Education (DRE) have a daily HOLY WEEK SERMON SERIES just for you! It's an easy-to-download daily mini-sermon (500 words/3.5 minutes) based on a central hymn from Palm Sunday to Great and Holy Pascha (Easter).


Archbishop Elpidophoros Presides Over Holy Unction at Saints Catherine and George Greek Orthodox Church Astoria, New York

05/02/2024

This Great and Holy Wednesday, His Eminence Archbishop Elpidophoros of America joined Fr. Anargyros Stavropoulos and the community of Saints Catherine and George Greek Orthodox Church in Astoria, New York for the Service of Holy Unction. The children of the Saints Catherine and George community warmly welcomed His Eminence into a church filled with parishioners for this special service.


Orthodox Christian Mission Center (OCMC) Highlights Palm Sunday in Uganda

05/01/2024

Bishop Silvester concelebrated the hierarchical Divine Liturgy with Metropolitan Innocentios of Sozusa at Panagia Paramythia - Mukongoro parish to observe the glorious and triumphant entry of our Lord Jesus Christ into Jerusalem on a donkey's colt.


Metropolitan Apostolos of New Jersey Visits Sts. Peter and Paul Greek Orthodox Church in Frederick, MD

05/01/2024

On Holy Tuesday His Eminence Metropolitan Apostolos of New Jersey visited the parish of Sts. Peter and Paul Greek Orthodox Church in Frederick, MD where he was enthusiastically welcomed by the beloved youth of the parish.


Senior Fellowship of St. Nektarios in Charlotte, NC Clean Sacred Church Vessels

05/01/2024

Members of the senior fellowship (“Young At Heart”) of St. Nektarios Greek Orthodox Church in Charlotte, North Carolina offered their time to help clean the sacred church vessels on Holy Monday.


Episode 5 – Season 2, The Black American Orthodox Experience on OCN. An Interview with Luther Menard – A Transfigured Life, Finding the Orthodox Church

05/01/2024

In this fifth episode of “The Black American Orthodox Experience” (season 2), a collaboration of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America and the Orthodox Christian Network, Rev. Samuel Davis discusses with Luther Menard about his journey to the Orthodox Church. When he converted from a Protestant, he explains how his family and friends were surprised, but supportive. He talks about the reactions that his closest circle went under and about his current work in Jacksonville, FL.


Archbishop Elpidophoros Homily for the Third Bridegroom Service Matins of Great and Holy Wednesday - April 30, 2024

05/01/2024

As I have been well pleased in past years, so I am also tonight to be with you, once again, for this Third Bridegroom Service, when we are blessed to hear once again the most beloved Hymn of Kassiani.


PATRIARCHAL ENCYCLICAL FOR HOLY PASCHA

05/01/2024

By the pleasure and grace of God, the giver of all gifts, having run the race of Holy and Great Lent and spent with compunction the Week of our Lord’s Passion, behold we delight in the celebration of His splendid Resurrection, through which we were redeemed from the tyranny of Hades.


Archbishop Elpidophoros Homily for the Second Bridegroom Service Great and Holy Tuesday - April 29, 2024

04/30/2024

We are now in the midst of our most precious season, and the hymns of the Church alert us to what is happening in this last week of the Lord’s earthly ministry. Day by day, we will follow the Lord on His Way to the Cross.


BACK TO TOP

BACK TO TOP

Denver Metropolis News

2024 Metropolis of Denver Oratorical Festival

2024 Camp Emmanuel

Event Details

June 23, 2024 - June 29, 2024

 

 

 


2024 Men's Retreat


BACK TO TOP

Ecumenical Patriarchate News

PATRIARCHAL ENCYCLICAL FOR HOLY PASCHA

05/01/2024

By the pleasure and grace of God, the giver of all gifts, having run the race of Holy and Great Lent and spent with compunction the Week of our Lord’s Passion, behold we delight in the celebration of His splendid Resurrection, through which we were redeemed from the tyranny of Hades.


BACK TO TOP