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Transfiguration of Our Saviour Greek Orthodox Church
Publish Date: 2019-02-17
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Transfiguration of Our Saviour Greek Orthodox Church

General Information

  • Phone:
  • (978) 458-4321
  • Fax:
  • (978) 458-8726
  • Street Address:

  • 25 Fr. John Sarantos Way

  • Lowell, MA 01854
  • Mailing Address:

  • 25 Fr. John Sarantos Way

  • Lowell, MA 01854


Contact Information






Services Schedule

Sunday Schedule:

Orthros: 8:30 a.m.
Divine Liturgy: 9:30 a.m.

Bible Study:

Wednesdays, 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.


Past Bulletins


Announcements

FELLOWSHIP HOUR

Fellowship Hour is sponsored in Loving Memory of Vaios Pallantzas by his family. Everyone is invited to join us for coffee and breakfast treats.

SUNDAY SCHOOL

On behalf of the entire Sunday School, we send a great big thank you to the parishioners who helped make Souperbowl Sunday a success! We raised $315 to be contributed to the Sunday School’s yearly IOCC donations! The 5th/6th grade class did an amazing job preparing, presenting on IOCC, and serving soup. What a great way for them learn about the importance of stewardship!

PLEASE NOTE

The Literacy Project is in need of “chapter” books for students in grades 3 and 4. We appreciate your interest in and support for this project for the children. Please place new or gently used book in the bin by the stairs.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR DONATIONS

We greatly appreciate the donations you make every week. If you write a check on Sundays, please mark in the memo section what it is to go towar (stewardship, offering, candle, etc.). Thank you for your assistance.

LTLC

The Transfiguration parish family hosts dinner at the Lowell Transitional Living Center the second Saturday of each month. The opportunity to serve dinner is open to all parishioners. Gather a group of 4 or 5 and sign up for your month in the lower lobby.

SAVE THE DATE

This year, the Transfiguration Sunday School will participate in the 36th Annual St. John Chrysostom National Oratorical Festival. Students in grades 7-12 will present their speeches on Sunday, March 24, following Divine Liturgy. We are striving for a full showing of parishioner support for our youth as they compete towards the National Finals, to be held June 7-9 at the Archangel Michael Church in Port Washington, New York. Please mark 3/24/19 on your calendar as they embark upon this opportunity. Questions or interest to help, please see Corrine Dubay or email her at corrinedubay@gmail.com. 

COMMUNITY OUTREACH

♥ Consider donating $10.00 Market Basket cards. There is always a need for people less fortunate than ourselves. Please place any food donations in the green container in the lobby.

♥ Please remember to keep the books coming for the 2019 school year!

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Weekly Calendar

Sunday, February 17  SUNDAY OF THE PUBLICAN AND PHARISEE
TRIODION BEGINS
†Orthros, 8:30am
†Liturgy,  9:30am
1-Year Memorial for Vaios Pallantzas

Monday, February 18        
Presidents' Day – office closed

Wednesday, February 20   
No Bible Study
Kafenion, 10:00am

Sunday, February 24  SUNDAY OF THE PRODIGAL SON
†Orthros, 8:30am
†Liturgy,  9:30am                                                                                                                                   

TODAY’S PARISH COUNCIL: Patricia Mahoney, Bill Arvanites, and Amanda Apostolou

TODAY’S GREETER: Cindy Rios

 

UPCOMING EVENTS

February 26                            
Community Kitchen, 11:30am-12:30pm

February 27                            
Bible Study, 10:00am                        
Kafenion, 10:00am

February 28                            
House of Hope

March 2                                  
First Saturday of Souls – Liturgy, 9:30am
Lenten Camp

March 3                                  
Monthly Trisagion

March 7                                  
Festival meeting, 6:30pm

March 9                                  
Second Saturday of Souls – Liturgy, 9:30am

March 10                                  
Kouloviakia Baking

March 11                                
Great Lent Begins
Compline, 6:30pm

March 12                                
Parish Council Meeting, 6:30pm

March 13                                
Bible Study, 10:00am
Kafenion, 10:00am
Pre-Sanctified Liturgy & Lenten dinner, 6:00pm

March 15                                
First Salutation, 6:30pm

March 16                                
Third Saturday of Souls – Liturgy, 9:30am

March 17                                
Holy Trinity Vespers

March 18                                
Compline, 6:30pm

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Hymns of the Day

Resurrectional Apolytikion in the Plagal First Mode

Let us worship the Word, O ye faithful, praising Him that with the Father and the Spirit is co-beginningless God, Who was born of a pure Virgin that we all be saved; for He was pleased to mount the Cross in the flesh that He assumed, accepting thus to endure death. And by His glorious rising, He also willed to resurrect the dead.

Apolytikion of the Church

When You were transfigured on the mountain, O Christ our God, You showed Your disciples Your glory as far as they could bear.  So now, for us sinners also, let this same eternal light shine forth through the prayers of the Theotokos.  O Giver of Light, glory to You.

Seasonal Kontakion in the Fourth Mode

Let us flee from the boasting of the Pharisee and learn through our own sighs of sorrow the humility of the Publican. Let us cry out to the Savior, "Have mercy on us, for through You alone are we reconciled."
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Gospel and Epistle Readings

Epistle Reading

Prokeimenon. Plagal First Mode. Psalm 11.7,1.
You, O Lord, shall keep us and preserve us.
Verse: Save me, O Lord, for the godly man has failed.

The reading is from St. Paul's Second Letter to Timothy 3:10-15.

TIMOTHY, my son, you have observed my teaching, my conduct, my aim in life, my faith, my patience, my love, my steadfastness, my persecutions, my sufferings, what befell me at Antioch, at lconion, and at Lystra, what persecutions I endured; yet from them all the Lord rescued me. Indeed all who desire to live a godly life in Christ Jesus will be persecuted, while evil men and impostors will go on from bad to worse, deceivers and deceived. But as for you, continue in what you have learned and have firmly believed, knowing from whom you learned it and how from childhood you have been acquainted with the sacred writings which are able to instruct you for salvation through faith in Christ Jesus.


Gospel Reading

Sunday of the Publican and Pharisee: Triodion Begins Today
The Reading is from Luke 18:10-14

The Lord said this parable, "Two men went up into the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. The Pharisee stood and prayed thus with himself, 'God, I thank you that I am not like other men, extortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. I fast twice a week, I give tithes of all that I get.' But the tax collector, standing far off, would not even lift up his eyes to heaven, but beat his breast, saying, 'God, be merciful to me a sinner!' I tell you, this man went down to his house justified rather than the other; for everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, but he who humbles himself will be exalted."


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Wisdom of the Fathers

It is possible for those who have come back again after repentance to shine with much lustre, and oftentimes more than those who have never fallen at all, I have demonstrated from the divine writings. Thus at least both the publicans and the harlots inherit the kingdom of Heaven, thus many of the last are placed before the first.
St. John Chrysostom
AN EXHORTATION TO THEODORE AFTER HIS FALL, 4th Century

When lately we made mention of the Pharisee and the publican, and hypothetically yoked two chariots out of virtue and vice; we pointed out each truth, how great is the gain of humbleness of mind, and how great the damage of pride.
St. John Chrysostom
CONCERNING LOWLINESS OF MIND., 4th Century

The Publican fasted not; and yet he was accepted in preference to him who had fasted; in order that thou mayest learn that fasting is unprofitable, except all other duties follow with it.
St. John Chrysostom
Homily III, 4th Century

For the nature of a fast is such, that it does not suffice to deliver those who practise it, unless it be done according to a suitable law. "For the wrestler," it is said, "is not crowned unless he strive lawfully."
St. John Chrysostom
Homily III, 4th Century

If there is a moral quality almost completely disregarded and even denied today, it is indeed humility. The culture in which we live constantly instills in us the sense of pride, of self-glorification, and of self-righteousness ... Even our churches - are they not imbued with that same spirit of the Pharisee? Do we not want our every contribution, every 'good deed,' all the we do 'for the Church' to be acknowledged, praised, publicized? ... How does one become humble? The answer, for a Christian, is simple: by contemplating Christ..."
Fr. Alexander Schmemann
Great Lent, pp. 19-20., 20th Century

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Saints and Feasts

Publphar
February 17

Sunday of the Publican and Pharisee: Triodion Begins Today

The Pharisees were an ancient and outstanding sect among the Jews known for their diligent observance of the outward matters of the Law. Although, according to the word of our Lord, they "did all their works to be seen of men" (Matt. 23:5), and were hypocrites (ibid. 23: 13, 14, 15, etc.), because of the apparent holiness of their lives they were thought by all to be righteous, and separate from others, which is what the name Pharisee means. On the other hand, Publicans, collectors of the royal taxes, committed many injustices and extortions for filthy lucre's sake, and all held them to be sinners and unjust. It was therefore according to common opinion that the Lord Jesus in His parable signified a virtuous person by a Pharisee, and a sinner by a Publican, to teach His disciples the harm of pride and the profit of humble-mindedness.

Since the chief weapon for virtue is humility, and the greatest hindrance to it is pride, the divine Fathers have set these three weeks before the Forty-day Fast as a preparation for the spiritual struggles of virtue. This present week they have called Harbinger, since it declares that the Fast is approaching; and they set humility as the foundation for all our spiritual labors by appointing that the parable of the Publican and the Pharisee be read today, even before the Fast begins, to teach, through the vaunting of the Pharisee, that the foul smoke of self-esteem and the stench of boasting drives away the grace of the Spirit, strips man of all his virtue, and casts him into the pits of Hades; and, through the repentance and contrite prayer of the Publican, that humility confers upon the sinner forgiveness of all his wicked deeds and raises him up to the greatest heights.

All foods are allowed the week that follows this Sunday.


Theotyrn
February 17

Theodore the Tyro, Great Martyr

Saint Theodore who was from Amasia of Pontus, contested during the reign of Maximian (286-305). He was called Tyro, from the Latin Tiro, because he was a newly enlisted recruit. When it was reported that he was a Christian, he boldly confessed Christ; the ruler, hoping that he would repent, gave him time to consider the matter more completely and then give answer. Theodore gave answer by setting fire to the temple of Cybele, the "mother of the gods," and for this he suffered a martyr's death by fire. See also the First Saturday of the Fast.


Allsaint
February 18

Leo the Great, Pope of Rome

According to some, this Saint was born in Rome, but according to others in Tyrrenia (Tuscany), and was consecrated to the archiepiscopal throne of Rome in 440. In 448, when Saint Flavian, Archbishop of Constantinople, summoned Eutyches, an archimandrite in Constantinople, to give account for his teaching that there was only one nature in Christ after the Incarnation, Eutyches appealed to Saint Leo in Rome. After Saint Leo had carefully examined Eutyches's teachings, he wrote an epistle to Saint Flavian, setting forth the Orthodox teaching of the person of Christ, and His two natures, and also counseling Flavian that, should Eutyches sincerely repent of his error, he should be received back with all good will. At the Council held in Ephesus in 449, which was presided over by Dioscorus, Patriarch of Alexandria (and which Saint Leo, in a letter to the holy Empress Pulcheria in 451, was the first to call "The Robber Council"), Dioscorus, having military might behind him, did not allow Saint Leo's epistle to Flavian to be read, although repeatedly asked to do so; even before the Robber Council was held, Dioscorus had uncanonically received the unrepentant Eutyches back into communion. Because Saint Leo had many cares in Rome owing to the wars of Attila the Hun and other barbarians, in 451 he sent four delegates to the Fourth Ecumenical Council, where 630 Fathers gathered in Chalcedon during the reign of Marcian, to condemn the teachings of Eutyches and those who supported him. Saint Leo's epistle to Flavian was read at the Fourth Council, and was confirmed by the Holy Fathers as the Orthodox teaching on the incarnate person of our Lord; it is also called the "Tome of Leo." The Saint wrote many works in Latin; he reposed in 461. See also Saint Anatolius, July 3.


Allsaint
February 19

The Holy Apostles of the Seventy Philemon, Apphia, Archippus, and Onesimus

Philemon, who was from Colossae, a city of Phrygia, was a man both wealthy and noble; Apphia was his wife. Archippus became Bishop of the Church in Colossae. All three were disciples of the Apostle Paul. Onesimus, who was formerly an unbeliever and slave of Philemon, stole certain of his vessels and fled to Rome. However, on finding him there, the Apostle Paul guided him onto the path of virtue and the knowledge of the truth, and sent him back to his master Philemon, to whom he wrote an epistle (this is one of the fourteen epistles of Saint Paul). In this epistle, Paul commended Onesimus to his master and reconciled the two. Onesimus was later made a bishop; in Greece he is honoured as the patron Saint of the imprisoned. All these Saints received their end by martyrdom, when they were stoned to death by the idolaters. Saint Onesimus is also commemorated on February 15.


Allsaint
February 20

Leo, Bishop of Catania

This Saint, who was from Ravenna in Italy, lived during the reign of Leo the Wise and his son Constantine Porphyrogenitus (end of the ninth and beginning of the tenth centuries). He struggled especially against the paganism and sorcery still prevalent in those regions.


Allsaint
February 21

Timothy the Righteous

Saint Timothy took up the monastic life from his youth, became a vessel of the Holy Spirit, and reposed in deep old age.


Allsaint
February 22

The Finding of the Precious Relics of the Holy Martyrs in the Quarter of Eugenius

The holy relics of these Saints were found in the quarter of Constantinople called Eugenius when Thomas was Patriarch of that city (607-610).


Allsaint
February 23

Polycarp the Holy Martyr & Bishop of Smyrna

This apostolic and prophetic man, and model of faith and truth, was a disciple of John the Evangelist, successor of Bucolus (Feb. 6), and teacher of Irenaeus (Aug. 23). He was an old man and full of days when the fifth persecution was raised against the Christians under Marcus Aurelius. When his pursuers, sent by the ruler, found Polycarp, he commanded that they be given something to eat and drink, then asked them to give him an hour to pray; he stood and prayed, full of grace, for two hours, so that his captors repented that they had come against so venerable a man. He was brought by the Proconsul of Smyrna into the stadium and was commanded, "Swear by the fortune of Caesar; repent, and say, 'Away with the atheists.'" By atheists, the Proconsul meant the Christians. But Polycarp, gazing at the heathen in the stadium, waved his hand towards them and said, "Away with the atheists." When the Proconsul urged him to blaspheme against Christ, he said: "I have been serving Christ for eighty-six years, and He has wronged me in nothing; how can I blaspheme my King Who has saved me?" But the tyrant became enraged at these words and commanded that he be cast into the fire, and thus he gloriously expired about the year 163. As Eusebius says, "Polycarp everywhere taught what he had also learned from the Apostles, which also the Church has handed down; and this alone is true" (Eccl. Hist., Book IV, ch. 14,15).


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